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The Lean to the Left Podcast

The Lean to the Left Podcast

Author: Bob Gatty

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No-holds-barred progressive commentary and newsmaker interviews with journalist Bob Gatty and guests. Insight into today's news plus analysis, with focus on social issues and just a little lean to the left.

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Hey guys, welcome to the Lean to the Left podcast, where we talk about progressive politics and the important social issues of our time. Today we’re looking at leadership and what some might think is an unlikely resource – the LGBTQ+ community.Our guest is Dr. Joel A. Davis Brown is the Chief Visionary Officer of Pneumos LLC, a management consulting and coaching firm based in San Francisco, USA, and Nairobi, Kenya, specializing in organizational strategy and culture, transformational leadership, global inclusion, executive coaching, conflict resolution, and strategic storytelling. Joel is the author of a new book, “The Soul of Queer Folk, How Understanding the LGBTQ+ Culture Can Transform Your Leadership Practice.”He is also the co-founder of metaPrincipleTM, a global institute designed to train practitioners on how to facilitate equity work anywhere around the world. Joel is an adjunct professor at the IESEG School of Management in Paris & Lille, France, where he teaches Storytelling for Leaders and Story Listening.As a change agent, Joel works strategically to cultivate innovative, creative, and adaptive environments where the cultural genius of everyone can be harnessed and leveraged successfully.On the podcast, Dr. Davis Brown says prejudice and violence against the queer community is on the rise in this country and elsewhere, and he blames right wing politicians and religious zealots for making that situation work.“Anytime there is quote unquote advances in equity and advances in progressive politics, if you will, there's always a backlash, and I think it's become sport, unfortunately, for a number of factions in our country to denigrate queer people because it helps to raise money, helps generate clicks. It helps to get people riled up,” he says.“They know that they don't have anything substantive to talk about. And so, it's a way for them to stay relevant, to stay in power and queer people have always been, for whatever reason, easy scapegoats because we still are a relatively marginalized community.”However, Dr. Davis Brown stresses that there is much that can be learned about leadership from the LGBTQ+ culture, which is the topic of his book, ““The Soul of Queer Folk,” including the ability to “interrogating itself to figure out who we are.”In addition, he says, “recognizing that there's a connection between all of us and that what I do for myself and what I do for others also impacts the world around us, but also recognizing that supporting justice in the world and such, creating a more just society is something that can't just be born out on social media and it just can't be talked about in private circles is something that you actively have to take action to achieve. And so those are some of the key lessons that I think we could learn from the LGBTQ+ community.”Here are some questions we addressed with Dr. Davis Brown: ● Why did you name the book “The Souls of Queer Folk”?● Why should a person who is not LGBTQ+-identified read this book?● What key themes should readers take away from this book?● Who could benefit from this book? Is this only for corporate professionals? Who’s the ideal audience?● What does the LGBTQ+ community possess that makes it an ideal case study for leadership?● What is Cultural Genius™? And how does it apply to leadership and the theme of your book?● What does it mean to be a transformational leader, and how does the LGBTQ+ community exhibit transformational leadership?● Why is this book timely right now?● Don’t other ethnic or social communities exhibit leadership? Why should we focus on the LGBTQ+ community?● How do you define transformational leadership?● How is this book different from traditional books on leadership?● What does it mean to be Queer-minded?● How is the LGBTQ+ community able to survive despite such daunting circumstances and how can they continue to persevere?● It seems like the LGBTQ+ community increasingly is confronted with acts of hate and violence. Has this worsened in recent years, and if so, why?Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
It is a remarkable story, and despite obvious political ramifications for lawmakers representing coal states, the U.S. has cut the use of coal for electricity generation from 50% in 2005 to 19.8% in 2021, and it's still falling.In fact, according to our podcast guest, scientist and energy expert Jack Kerfoot, renewables like solar and wind power are expected to overtake coal as the world's top energy source by 2025, just two years from now.In this extremely informative episode, Kerfoot walks us through those developments and explains what they mean for the future, including impact on the world's environment as we deal with climate change.Kerfoot begins the episode with an explanation of the various types of coal, how they are used, and their cost. He says that as we move away from coal to renewables, energy prices will dramatically decrease even as we reduce the greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change.Here are the costs associated with various types of energy generation, according to Kerfoot: 1) Onshore Wind – 2.6¢ to 5.0¢ per kWh 2) Onshore Solar PV – 2.8¢ to 4.1¢ per kWh 3) Natural Gas ($3.45 MMBTU) – 4.5¢ to 7.4¢ per kWh 4) Geothermal – 5.6¢ to 9.3¢ per kWh 5) Coal – 6.5¢ to 15.2¢ per kWh 6) Natural Gas Peaker Plants – 15.1¢ to 19.6¢ per kWh 7) Nuclear – 13.1¢ to 20.4¢ per kWh."Clearly, onshore wind and solar are significantly cheaper sources of electricity on a levelized cost basis than coal-fueled power plants. I anticipate that new technologies will allow the cost of electricity from wind and solar to continue to decrease over the next decade," Kerfoot says. Here's the breakdown of energy sources in the U.S.in 2021 compared to 2005: In 2005, utilities used Coal (49.6%), Nuclear (19.3%), Petroleum Gas (19.1%), Hydropower (6.7%), Oil (3.0%), and Renewable Energy (2.3%) (geothermal, solar, wind, and biomass) to generate electricity in America. In 2021, utilities used Petroleum Gas (38.8%), Coal (21.9%), Nuclear (18.9 %), Renewables (13.7%), Hydropower (6.2%), and Oil (0.5%).In 2021, all forms of renewable energy (hydropower, wind, solar, etc.) generated 19.9% of the nation’s electricity.What caused this big shift to renewables?In 2005, there was growing concern across our nation over the impact of global warming, which results in climate change, Kerfoot says, adding that there was also concern over our nation’s energy security. Moreover, the price of crude oil (WTI) was over US $56/Barrel and was forecast to go over $100/Barrel by 2008, which is what happened, he explains.Because of these developments, Congress passed the bipartisan “Energy Policy Act of 2005,” providing tax incentives to encourage domestic energy production including renewable energy like wind and solar, nuclear power, “clean coal”, and oil/gas technology."The legislation did Not have any significant impact on rejuvenating nuclear power development or the coal industry. The legislation Did have significant impact on the development of wind and solar technology and hydraulic fracturing (fracking) technology in the oil/gas industry," Kerfoot says."The tax incentives encouraged entrepreneurs, like the late T. Boone Pickens to develop wind farms in Texas. In 2006, a wind farm boom commenced in many of the Great Plains states, which have strong consistent winds, an abundance of entrepreneurs, innovative power companies, and low population densities," he explains."Current data indicates that renewable energy (including hydropower) will greater than 50% of the nation’s electricity before 2050. The times they are a changing."Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
The Republicans are doing everything they can to attack President Biden because of his age, saying the 81-year-old Biden has lost his capacity to effectively serve as president.Many Democrats share the concern about Biden’s age and not-so-secretly wish there was a younger, qualified option to the president.Stay with us to meet 52-year-old Jason Palmer, a venture capitalist who is challenging Joe Biden for the 2024 Democratic presidential nomination. He’s a super longshot to unseat the 81-year-old president.Previously a General Partner at New Markets Venture Partners and Deputy Director at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Jason firmly believes in what he calls “conscious capitalism” and modernizing our government so the United States can be a true leader in the 21st century.Jason is a leader in the technology and innovation space, having served in executive positions at Microsoft, Kaplan Education, The Gates Foundation, and his impact investor firm, New Markets Venture Partners.A Harvard Business School alumni, Jason believes his 30 years of business and technology leadership qualifies him to run President, saying it is time to “pass the torch to a younger generation.”Here are key questions we discussed with Palmer:Q. What is “conscious capitalism?”Q. Tell us about your background and why you decided to run for president.Q. You must admit this is an incredibly long shot to unseat Biden. How do you see this happening? What’s your path to winning the nomination?Q. But you campaigned extensively in New Hampshire ahead of their primary, but you came in 10th and managed only 142 votes, or just 0.1 percent of those voting. That must have been discouraging. Marianne Williamson received over 5,000 votes, and she’s already dropped out of the race.Q. So you believe you can catch fire with younger voters, especially?Q. But besides the age factor, what do you bring to the table that makes you think you can and should be President?Q. What’s your message to voters who like Biden, believe he’s done a remarkable job despite Republican intransigence, and push worries about his age aside?Q. You’re not a household name, at least not as yet. So how do you plan to overcome this lack of name recognition?Q. Artificial intelligence is rapidly growing in the U.S. with a potential serious impact on the economy, and on employment in many sectors. What are your thoughts about that and the overall importance of technology?Q. Why are you better than Biden in handling these disruptions?Q. What about unions and organized labor? As a business executive, what are your thoughts about companies like Starbucks facing efforts to organize their employees?Q. What would you do about the student loan crisis in this country? Do you believe student loans should be forgiven?Q. Yes, you have significant business and technology experience that could serve you well as president. But what about foreign policy and other key areas where you lack experience?Q. Can you see yourself face-to-face against Putin?Q. To what extent should the U.S. be involved in Ukraine’s battle against Russia?Q. And what about the situation in Israel and the Gaza Strip? What should the U.S. do?Q. What are your thoughts about the immigration crisis and Trump’s ability to stop Congress from passing the reform legislation that Republicans had previously insisted upon?Q. Say you win the nomination. What would be your strategy in going after Trump…he who is only four years younger than Biden and faces more than 90 criminal charges stemming from his effort to overturn the 2020 election, as well as his business dealings.Q. Do you think Nikki Haley has a chance to unseat Trump for the GOP nod?Q. What is your core message to voters? Why should they support you? Q. How long do you plan to stay in this race if results don’t improve?Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
In the United States, the racial divisions among us seem to be deepening, fueled at least in part by political opportunists who prey upon fear and emotion.Our Lean to the Left podcast guest is Juliet Hooker, a leading thinker on democracy and race and author of a new book, Black Grief, White Grievance. Her book examines racial politics and argues that both White and Black communities must learn to accept loss – for different reasons and to different ends."Political loss has been unequally distributed in the history of the United States," she says during the interview. "Because of White supremacy, Black people, in general, have had to shoulder a disproportionate number of losses and Whites as a group have been able to avoid loss more because of their position as the dominant group, politically, economically, socially."This uneven distribution of loss has consequences for democracy," she asserts, "because it means that some citizens are making more sacrifices on behalf of the stability of the country than others. And in democracy, everyone is supposed to lose, right? That's the definition of democracy. There's change, there's rotation, no one wins all the time. And so that's one of the overall arguments."The Jan. 6, 2021 attack on the Capitol by Donald Trump's MAGA supporters is a perfect example of the "White grievance", says Professor Hooker."I think it is," she says. "Of course, there are a number of different things that were going on that fueled January 6th, but I think We one way to think about or one of the factors is definitely this mobilization of the sense that that certain people aren't supposed to lose right in the US that they are the true Americans, right?"About Professor HookerProfessor Hooker is the Royce Family Professor of Teaching Excellence in Political Science at Brown University, where she teaches courses on racial justice, Black political thought, Latin American political thought, democratic theory, and contemporary political theory. Before coming to Brown, she was a faculty member at the University of Texas at Austin.She also is the author of Race and the Politics of Solidarity, Theorizing Race in the Americas, and editor of Black and Indigenous Resistance in the Americas: From Multiculturalism to Racist Backlash.Here are some questions we explored with Professor Hooker as she discussed Black Grief, White Grievance:Q. First, tell us about your book, its premise, and what prompted you to write it.Q. In the promos for your book, it says that in democracies, citizens must accept loss; we can’t always be on the winning side. But in the United States, the fundamental civic capacity of being able to lose is not distributed equally among the races. Please explain.Q. In your book’s introduction, you write that “Black grief and white grievance are linked because white grievance obscures and supplants Black grief and is often mobilized in response to it. Please explain. Q. How did the Trump administration exacerbate this?Q. Trump, of course, refuses to accept the loss of the 2020 election and the January 6 attack on the Capitol was the result. Is that an example of White grievance?Q. What about Trump’s attacks on immigrants seeking asylum in the U.S?Q. You also write that “while Black grief has historically been mobilized by Black activists in service of Black freedom, we must reckon with the loss this entails.” What do you mean?Q. You write that Black citizens are “expected to protest only in the most civil, nondisruptive ways in order for their losses to be legible. Refusals to contain Black rage are said to be counterproductive because they alienate potential white allies.” Are you saying that violent, disruptive protests are justified?Q. Many of the January 6 protestors have received lengthy prison sentences for their actions. But you write that “armed white antimask protesters at various state capitals and white insurrectionists at the Capitol received kid-glove treatment compared to the heavy-handed, violent, repressive tactics unleashed on racial justice protesters.” Do you believe justice is being served in these January 6 cases?Q. Do you believe Donald Trump will face justice for his actions regarding the election and January 6? Why or why not?Q. What about police shootings of unarmed Black people? What needs to happen to end such actions?Q. You write that “Despite recurring anxiety that Black rage at ongoing loss will fray the bonds of the body politic, it is in fact white refusal to accept legitimate political loss that is the most profoundly antidemocratic force in US politics.” Please elaborate.Q. How can these continuing racial tensions be eased in the U.S.?Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
According to the National Institutes of Health, 20 million Americans suffer from substance abuse at some point in their lives. Mary Beth O’Conno was one of those, but since 1994 has been sober from methamphetamine use disorder. She wrote about her journey in an award-winning memoir, “From Junkie to Judge: One Woman’s Triumph Over Trauma and Addiction.” Mary Beth shares her story with us in this episode of the Lean to the Left podcast and answers the question: how does a junkie get clean & become a judge?Within a week of being born, Mary Beth was dropped off at a convent. Eventually, she moved in with her mom, but she -- her mom -- was more focused on her own needs and desires than her young child. At age nine, her stepfather kicked her in the stomach for spilling milk, beat her when she displeased him, and molested her at age twelve. A few months later, she took a sip of Boone’s Farm Strawberry Hill wine, which made her feel euphoric and relaxed. So, she drank as much as possible, added pot, then pills, then acid. At sixteen, she found methamphetamine and experienced joy, but when this high was no longer sufficient, she turned to the needle and shot up. That began 16 years of severe addiction, resulting in destroyed relationships, problems at work, and damage to her physical and emotional health. But, today, Mary Beth O’Connor is a retired federal administrative law judge. She is director, secretary, and founding investor for the She Recovers Foundation, a director for Life-Ring Secular Recovery, and a member of the advisory council for the Hyer Calling Foundation. Her opinion pieces have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Philadelphia Inquirer, Recovery Today, and other publications. Six years into her recovery, Mary Beth attended Berkeley Law. She worked at a large firm, then litigated class actions for the federal government leading to her appointment as a federal administrative law judge in 2014, a position from which she retired in 2020.Here are some questions we discussed with Mary Beth as she answers the question: How does a junkie get clean & become a judge?Q. Tell us more about your background and what made you to turn to meth.Q. What happened that prompted you to seek help?Q. The Alcoholics Anonymous 12-step program didn’t work for you. Why not? What did you do?Q. What peer support options are available to those seeking recovery, and why is that important for the recovering addict?Q. How can your book, “From Junkie to Judge,” help those individuals win their battle against addiction?Q. Tell us about the She Recovers Foundation. Why was it started and what does it do?Q. How about LifeRing Secular Recovery?Q. Back when you were struggling as a drug addict, did you ever think you would be in this position today – a published author, counselor, and retired federal judge?Q. How can your story inspire others? Q. I just interviewed a guest who spent five years in prison for a white collar crime. After his experience in prison where most inmates were incarcerated because of illegal drugs, he now believes all such drugs should be legalized; that this would drastically reduce crime and save billions by ending an unwinnable war against illegal drugs. How do you feel about that?Q. Where can people learn more about your work and obtain your book?\Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
Would you buy into a plan to reduce violence & crime and make our streets, schools, workplaces, and homes safe again from an ex-con who spent nearly five years in prison for defrauding investors? Well, that’s our guest on the Lean to the Left podcast. Herbert Kay spent nearly five years in prison for defrauding investors, convincing them that risks were fall smaller and rewards far greater than they really were. Today, freed, he continues to pay restitution to his victims.In between, Kay has been a retailer, insurance salesman, stock broker, registered principal, public speaker, bestselling author, venture capitalist, business turn-around expert, TV talk show host, network talking head, consultant, direct marketer and real estate developer.And, now he’s the front man for a 501c3 non-profit that promotes what he calls the 1964 Plan, which he says would make America the safest country in the world if implemented.During the interview, Kay explains how his experience in prison provided the insight that has resulted in his plan, which includes making all drugs legal, restoring the nuclear family and ending no-fault divorce, moving welfare programs from the federal government to the states, providing humanitarian care for the homeless, and advocating for a return to celibacy until marriage.Kay tells a story from prison where he, a Jew, deliberately tried to pick a fight with a White supremacist so the guards would stop it and he would be placed in protective custody. The ploy backfired and the Nazi-loving con became Kay's prison tutor, helping him safely survive his time behind bars.Here are some questions we covered with Kay as he discussed his plan to reduce violence & crime:Q. First, tell us what happened that landed you in prison?Q. You’ve told me that prison was the best experience of your life, why was that?Q. What did you learn in prison that resulted in your 1964 Plan? And where did the name come from?Q. Your website says the 1964 Plan would irradicate mass murder, homelessness, human trafficking, violent crime, and addiction. How would it do that?Q. OK, let’s talk about the restoration of the nuclear family. Are you saying that you want women to stay home, cook and clean and tend to the kids while hubby is the bread winner?Q. Really, you want to ban birth control pills, end no-fault divorce as well as government welfare payments?Q. Ok, you want to legalize drugs – all drugs. What good would that do? Aren’t drugs the reason why there is so much violent crime today?Q. Prison reform is a core component of your plan. What needs to happen?Q. Your plan establishes a national compulsory service requirement for every teenager. How would that work and what would it accomplish?Q. Your plan addresses homelessness. Tell us about that.Q. Back to drugs. What are your thoughts about Trump’s wall as a way to keep illegal drugs out of this country?Q. In the white paper introducing your plan, You say “Our politics have descended into a pit of obsequious gladhanding weasels without a single vertebrae, and they have spent us to the brink of destruction.” What makes you think these “gladhanding weasels” would embrace your plan, parts of which would be hated by those on the right and the left?Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
In this episode of the 'Lean to the Left' podcast, the Dixie Dems, composed of Arthur Hill, Robert Thompson, and the host, engage in a lively discussion on current political happenings amid Donald Trump's hush money trial and its implications.Topics include the Republicans' challenges, Marjorie Taylor Greene's push against House Speaker Mike Johnson, and the Democrats' prospects in upcoming elections. They explore serious issues like abortion, immigration, and the influence of social media on political narratives.The episode also covers local politics, including controversial statements by political candidates and significant investments in North Carolina. Additionally, there's talk about the effectiveness of campaigning tactics, like stamping money with political messages.The conversation concludes with personal anecdotes and reflections on how these complex political matters impact their lives and communities.00:00 Welcome to the Lean to the Left Podcast!00:40 Turbulent Times in Politics: Trump's Trial and GOP Chaos02:15 Diving into the Hush Money Trial: A Comedic Take04:25 Serious Politics: Upcoming Primaries and Candidate Spotlights05:25 The Border Wall Debate and Immigration Insights07:14 Electric Cars and Environmental Moves19:16 Abortion and Immigration: Election Game Changers?30:09 Wrapping Up: Orioles' Victory and Final ThoughtsBecome a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
Women are 51 percent of the U.S. population, but only 33 percent of state legislators across the country are women, and the way things are, it could take more than 200 years to reach parity. That’s where the organization Vote Run Lead comes in. Its goal is to close that gap, and so has launched an initiative called “Charting a Path to Women’s Majority,” to help achieve that.Vote Run Lead offers training and even financial help for female candidates for local and state offices, and even U.S. Congress, who support progressive initiatives like fighting restrictions on abortion and contraception and other liberal causes.The organization's chief political officer, is our guest on the Lean to the Left podcast."It's the fact that when you line up the actual population of this country and pretend that the elected representatives we have are actually fully representing those folks. It feels like a joke, right? How can you say that in a state like ... South Carolina, less than 20 percent women [are] speaking on behalf of policies that impact a population that is 51 percent women, is somehow reflective and representative. It just means that, the policymaking and the decision making in government is not actually taking into account the lived experiences and the needs and the values of the full population adequately," Shulman says.She points out that in Southeastern states that have the fewest women in political, policymaking positions "it is a pocket of some of the most restrictive laws related to women's health care, abortion access, contraceptive access. There's an absolute correlation there of who's making the laws and who those policies are actually serving or not serving."Vote Run Lead provides both on-line and in-person training for female candidates and campaign management personnel, helping them with every aspect of campaigning for public office, according to Shulman."We are a training institute," she explains. "We recruit, we support women once they're running. We are really focusing in on one of our key initiatives is called Run/51. And that has become our largest focus. It is the initiative that is aimed at women's majorities in state legislatures specifically. We're still the political home for any values-aligned woman who is interested in running, but Run/51 is really where we are putting most of our resources to recruit women to run specifically for state legislatures, giving them the training and the confidence and the tools to run a successful campaign and to be with them throughout their political journey."For more info about Vote Run Lead, Run/51, and the many services provided by the organization, please check out this episode of the Lean to the Left podcast, "Calling Female Candidates."Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
In 2020, Republican Rep. Nancy Mace of South Carolina’s First Congressional District, edged out Democratic incumbent Rep. Joe Cunningham. He was the first Democrat to flip a House seat in South Carolina in 30 years.Mace won by just 5,400 votes, or one percent. Then, two years ago, following redistricting, Mace won reelection by 14 percent. Since then, Mace was critical of Trump following the Jan. 6, 2021 MAGA-inspired attack on the U.S. Capitol, but she’s endorsed Trump – despite the many criminal charges against him and despite his conviction for sexually abusing writer E. Jean Carroll in the 1990s.Now, attorney Mac Deford is one of two Democrats running in the June 11 SC primary for the chance to oppose Mace in November. His opponent in the primary is business executive Michael Moore.We’re pleased to have Deford with us on the Lean to the Left podcast. Here are questions we discussed with Mac:Q. Late last month a federal court ruled that the South Carolina elections will be held under a map already deemed unconstitutional and discriminatory against Black voters by the same three-judge panel that found that the state used race as a proxy for partisan affiliation, a violation of the 14th amendment to the Constitution. Your thoughts about that.Q. You’re an attorney, a former Coast Guard Police Officer, and you’ve worked for a software company. You’ve also served as an attorney for Mount Pleasant and Hilton Head Island. If you should win the election, how would this experience inform your service in the House of Representatives?Q. What are your thoughts about Congresswoman Mace supporting Trump after criticizing him for the Jan. 6 insurrection?Q. What are your top priorities for Congressional action in the next two years?Q. Your district, District 1, is dependent on tourism, sensitive to climate issues, in need of affordable housing. It’s comprised of varied communities with different needs. If elected, how will you deal with those issues and meet those needs?Q. How will you address the challenges of healthcare accessibility and affordability?Q. How do you plan to engage with and represent underrepresented or marginalized groups in our district? Q. Trump and the Republicans are talking about Social Security and Medicare cuts. Your thoughts?Q. Where do you stand on the issue of reproductive rights?Q. What about immigration? Q. Many voters are frustrated by the inability of Congress to pass legislation in recent years. Some members, including numerous Republicans, are leaving Congress because of their frustration. Why do you believe it will be any different for you?Q. Why did you decide to take on this challenge? South Carolina isn’t exactly Democrat friendly!Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
Uncover the truth behind 'Greenwashing Lies' and how they mislead consumers. Join the fight against climate change with John Pabon's eye-opening insights. "Greenwashing" lies by governments, businesses, international organizations, and even celebrities mislead consumers and weakens efforts to take meaningful, effective action in the fight against climate change.That's the message from John Pabon, a Melbourne, Australia climate author and business advisor, who has just published a new book, “The Great Greenwashing: How Corporations, Governments, and Influencers Are Lying to You,” in an interview for The Lean to the Left Podcast.In fact, says Pabon, "greenspeak", misdirection, and "green scamming" are now more prevalent than ever as even businesses, organizations, and celebrities, who claim to support efforts to protect our environment actually are taking actions that contribute to the climate crisis that we all face."Those are the three tried and true ways that greenwashing happens," Pabon says. "So the first is all this marketing speak around being eco friendly, being green. So you'll see green packaging. They love to do that as if that means anything or saying, we, we care about the earth, but not backing it up with any real meaningful statistics." That's "greenspeak.""Misdirection is another," he says. "So look over here, not over here. Look at this cute picture of kids on the front of our sustainability report, but not the child labor we have going on in Bangladesh, right? Don't look at that part. So then that's another way they love to do that.""And the final way is green scamming. And this is the most insidious and probably the scariest part of greenwashing that I didn't even know was going on, but big cashed up organizations, usually the big dinosaurs like oil and gas, they'll actually fund front groups that on the surface look like they're doing something good for the planet, but really they're lobbying groups to throw people off the scent."Such groups, he says, discredit climate change, "posing as if they are scientists and expecting nobody to actually do the research and realize these aren't scientists. These are marketing teams pushing out BS statistics," he says.Here are some surprising conclusions shared by Pabon during the interview:The climate crisis is too serious for "kumbaya", "feel-good" claims about progress being made. "Converting people to actual action is the missing piece." He's disappointed in climate efforts of the Biden administration, saying "they've not had a strong a performance as one would assume those from the left hand side of the political spectrum would actually have had."To uncover greenwashing lies, consumers should research "green" claims before purchasing related products or supporting candidates.Consumers can make a big difference in the choices they make. "We're not talking about having to do everything all at once. You don't have to be a perfect environmentalist, just making these actions that move the needle in the right direction. That's good enough. There's plenty, there's billions of other people doing the right thing. You don't have to do it all."Some major car companies, which he declined to identify, are looking to the future and considering how they can diversify so they are not exclusively reliant on selling motor vehicles. Responsible businesses will do more than government to effectively combat global warming. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
Get the inside scoop on the race to replace Mitch McConnell and the odds of Trump vs Biden in this intriguing political post. What are the odds? Long-time Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, who has represented Kentucky in the Senate since 1985, has announced that he’ll step down from his leadership post in November. And so, the race is on to replace him, making for one of the most intriguing political stories of the year – aside from the presidential election and the battle for control of Congress itself.What’s going to happen? Who better to ask than a veteran professional political gambler, oddsmaker and analyst? Check out our interview with Paul Krishnamurty, political oddsmaker and analyst for www.BetOnline.ag.Paul began betting on politics in the UK in 2001 and in the U.S. in 2008. He’s been an analyst for Betfair, the world’s largest betting exchange, and since 2020 has been the political oddsmaker for BetOnline.ag.On the show, Krishnamurty says the odds favor Sen. John Thune (SD) and John Cornyn (TX) each have about a 46 percent chance of succeeding McConnell, depending on what happens between now and the election.On the presidential front, this veteran oddsmaker puts Biden ahead of Trump as of now, saying that the Democrat's chances are improving, although third party candidates could cost him votes. He predicts that the criminal cases against Trump will result in at least one conviction, but that the twice-impeached former President will not serve prison time.What does he have to say about Trump selling $400 sneakers and $60 Bibles to raise money?Who will he pick as his vice presidential running mate?What about Congress? What are the odds that the Democrats will take control of the House of Representatives and maintain their edge in the Senate? Check out the episode to find out.By the way, here are some questions we discussed with Paul:Q. Since we opened with the tease about Mitch McConnell, let’s talk about that. Looks like we have three Johns – all white guys in their 60s – leading the race to succeed him. What are the odds of that?Q. Now I know you don’t actually lay down bets on such races, but if you WERE to bet on this one, who would you pick – and why?Q. Let’s go to Trump. He lucked out the other day when that judge in New York cut the fraud bond that he must pay from $464 million to $175 million, and gave him an extra 10 days to come up with the cash. Until that happened, there was talk Trump might be forced to declare bankruptcy. Have those odds changed?Q. What about the Georgia case, which has been tainted by the scandal involving Fulton County prosecutor Fani T. Willis hiring her lover to help lead the Georgia election meddling case against Trump. What are the odds that Trump will be convicted there?Q. How about the federal case involving the Jan. 6 insurrection that’s being led by special prosecutor Jack Smith? Will Trump be convicted there? Will he go to prison?Q. OK, let’s turn to the presidential election. How do you see that shaking out? What are the odds that either Trump or Biden – or both – will be replaced as their party’s nominee?Q. If Trump is convicted in any of these cases, will that doom his chances for election?Q. Is Nikki Haley still viable as a candidate to replace Trump? Maybe at the GOP convention?Q. What about Trump VP picks? Who’s really in play?Q. The Supreme Court is considering whether to ban an abortion drug in the latest challenge to women’s rights. Will abortion be a deciding factor in the election?Q. How about age and overall health of the candidates? It’s a problem for Biden, but he’s trying to turn that against Trump as well? Could it be a deciding factor in the election? Who has the edge on this one?Q. What about the House of Representatives? Do the Democrats have a realistic shot at taking control?Q. How about the Senate? Can the Democrats hold on there? What races should we be watching?Q. What’s your overall prediction as to where we’ll stand politically after election day?Q. Tell us about Betonline.ag. Can people bet on politics there?Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
It’s a fact that Thomas Jefferson said the U.S. Constitution should expire when the last Founder died, and it’s also true that George Washington expected the Constitution to last no more than 20 years.What if they were right? What if our Constitution expired? What would happen today with the political upheaval that’s taking place in America, with both sides relying on the Constitution to justify their positions?A new political thriller imagines what might happen if the United States had to hammer out a whole new Constitution today. Who would we entrust to that monumental task? Who is today’s George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, James Madison, or Thomas Jefferson? What would happen to our country if, indeed, our treasured Constitution was no longer in force?Novelist John Boykin has imagined this in his new political thriller, The Constitution Has Expired, and he's our guest on the Lean to the Left podcast.In fact, something had been troubling Boykin for decades. If the American form of government was the best in the world, why didn’t other countries emulate it? And while the U.S. Constitution was proving nearly impossible to amend, emerging countries were writing their own constitutions from scratch. What if the U.S. had to do that all over again?This became the premise of The Constitution Has Expired. Though the book is fiction, Boykin researched it as carefully as his award-winning nonfiction, down to the smell of the ink used by the calligrapher who prepared the original version on parchment.Boykin's nonfiction book, “One Brief Miracle,” told the inside story of American diplomat Philip Habib’s mission to stop the 1982 Israeli siege of Beirut. Former Secretary of State George Shultz wrote the foreword, and the book won the American Academy of Diplomacy book award under its hardcover title, “Cursed is the Peacemaker.” You can learn more about both books at ApplegateLLC.com/John.So, what if our Constitution expired?What would happen?Here are some key questions we discussed with Boykin:The Constitution Has Expired starts out with a young woman studying the original of the Constitution at the National Archives and discovering, unbelievably, that Article 5 contained a sentence stating that the Constitution would expire 100 years after its establishment, something that no one had ever noticed before. That would mean that the Constitution, as we know it, is no longer in force, having expired in the mid-1800s. What would be the implications of that?You say there are three key failings of the Constitution. What are they?How has the Constitution been eviscerated by partisanship?Section 3 of the 14th Amendment states that no person can serve in political office if they had engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the U.S. Do you believe that should prevent Donald Trump from seeking the presidency?The novel is critical of both political parties. Do you believe in the two-party system? What’s your solution? Some say we are a republic, not a democracy—even that the Founders hated democracy. Is that true?Why is "Let the voters decide" heartwarming humbug that ignores the Electoral College? Doesn’t the majority rule?The other day Trump encouraged people to vote and said every vote counts. That’s one Trump statement with which Democrats agree. But you don’t believe that, right? How has your research into the Constitution affected your view of government disfunction?Your subtitle is "A novel. Really. Probably." What is that about?Your day job is designing websites for businesses. How does that relate to writing a novel about the Constitution expiring?Where can people find your book? An audio version was recently released, right?Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
Former federal air marshal Russell Jack says Donald Trump's MAGA movement has infiltrated federal law enforcement agencies, with many officers embracing right-wing dogma and openly endorsing such entities as QAnon and Punisher."The MAGA culture has co-opted and taken over the federal government as far as law enforcement (is concerned)," says Jack on the Lean to the Left podcast. "And some of the things I've seen on that is like symbolism, like the QAnon or Punisher. QAnon is like an extreme version of MAGA, and the Punisher symbol is interesting.""It's a Punisher skull," Jack explains. "It's based off the comic book. A lot of people in the military, like special forces would wear that. When law enforcement started wearing it, I questioned my fellow law enforcement officers. I'm like, why are you wearing a Punisher skull? And they're like, it's MAGA. And I'm like you do realize that is saying that it's okay to act outside the law. As a law enforcement officer."Jack is the author of a new. book, "Is MAGA a Terrorist Movement," and he says that from 2016 to 2022 he saw MAGA operating freely inside the U.S. government, both as agents and management.Jack worked for more than two decades as a federal air marshal, and before that as a federal police officer for five years with two different agencies. He began his career in the Army National Guard as a military policeman deployed for Operation Desert Storm.Has MAGA Infiltrated Federal Law Enforcement?"When I was working as an air marshal, they (fellow officers) went from being quiet to saying the quiet part out loud. It went from quietly thinking these things to being empowered and emboldened to talk about them more," he says, and that was due to the election of Trump in 2016."So what I noticed is there started to become incidents like intimidation of LGBTQ community. And also just following a lot of the things were happening with, for lack of a better word, the takeover of the government. So it's very concerning that many people in law enforcement, especially my agency, were openly okay with MAGA, which...does a lot of illegal activity, which as a police officer, you would think, hey, a guy who has over 90 criminal indictments against him allegedly could be a criminal. And why would law enforcement support something like that? Anyone else if it was, a Democrat with 90 plus charges, I'm pretty sure they'd say something negative."Why does Jack describe MAGA as a terrorist movement?"Terrorism is basically, and I'm going to paraphrase it is using coercion, intimidation, violence force to illegally, using those methods, to achieve political goals, especially if it's done against a civilian population," he says."So, when you look at the parameters of terrorism it becomes pretty clear that a lot of the activities that have happened--January 6th, where they violated the 12th Amendment. Ratification of our votes. And by them stopping that, because the vote was stopped, they violated the 12th Amendment. January 6th was violent. They injured over 100 police officers. They killed police officers. And then there's many other examples also, to Paul Pelosi, Nancy Pelosi's husband being attacked with a hammer, the man fractured his skull, the surrounding of the Biden bus. Here's an example of civilian intimidation. So they surrounded that to intimidate them and that's terrorism."The "Let's Go Brandon" comment," he says is "a euphemism for F Joe Biden. So that is also intimidation. The purpose to that is to cow liberals or non MAGA people into silence."And then you have the death threats...to election officials. They've happened to Democratic members of Congress. They've happened to people who are involved in prosecution of Donald Trump. So those are all examples of how they are a terrorist movement."Has MAGA infiltrated federal law enforcement?There is no doubt, warns Jack, who says this is a danger to our society andcalls on all Americans who care about our country and its freedoms to vote. "The best way to counteract them is voting," says Jack. "I want you to know how important that vote is and what it represents."Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
The 2024 presidential race is set as a rematch of 2020, and even though Donald Trump faces 91 federal and state felony charges, his grip on the Republican Party has never been stronger.Nevertheless, author and political thought leader Steve Phillips believes the new American majority, consisting of people of color plus progressive whites, will prevail.In fact, on the Lean to the Left podcast, Phillips contends that this coalition of people who want to see America become a multiracial democracy should result in Democrats keeping the White House, flipping the House, and holding the Senate, and thus defend the multiracial democracy from attacks by modern-day Confederates. "That's the majority of people in the country, and that majority is growing every day," says Phillips on the Lean to the Left podcast, "and that's the other aspect of what is driving Republican politics, is stoking fears around this changing composition. People can see it and they feel it in their bones that the nature of the country is going to change in terms of its racial composition."Phillips says the presidential elections are the closest thing America has to a national referendum, and "except for the 2004 election of Kerry versus Bush, the Democrats have won the popular vote in every single presidential election since 1992. So that further shows that the raw numbers are on the progressive side, which is why the Republicans on the right are so ferociously determined to try to suppress the vote."So, says Phillips, the author of the new edition of his book, "How We Win the Civil War," Republicans are doing everything they can -- just as they did in the years after the original Civil War -- to prevent people of color coming out to vote because that is the only way for the white power structure to remain intact.America already is in a second civil war, he says, adding that the January 6, 2021 MAGA attack on the U.S. Capitol was part of that. In “How We Win the Civil War,” Phillips analyzes the 2022 midterm elections – including why there was no Red Wave and why Stacey Abrams lost but Rev. Raphael Warnock won in Georgia, a topic he also addresses on the podcast. Democrats, he contends, must recognize that we’re in a contest between democracy and white supremacy left unresolved after the Civil War, and, he says that Trump’s entire agenda is focused on making America white again.His work serves as a roadmap towards securing a multiracial democracy and provides a stepping stone towards ending white supremacy for good, contends Phillips. He is a New York Times bestselling author, columnist, and the author of the New York Times and Washington Post bestselling “Brown Is the New White: How the Demographic Revolution Has Created a New American Majority.”Phillips also is the founder of Democracy in Color, a political media organization dedicated to race, politics, and the multicultural progressive New American Majority. He hosts “Democracy in Color with Steve Phillips,” a color-conscious podcast on politics, and is a regular columnist for The Nation and The Guardian.The updated paperback edition of "How We Win the Civil War," published on March 12, is available at Amazon and other major booksellers.Here are some questions we addressed with Phillips:Q. In your new book, you warn that the Confederates never stopped fighting the Civil War, that conservatives are taking full advantage of this reality, and that those in denial imperil our democracy. Is this election more about defending and preserving than anything else?Q. What is the way forward? How can those who want to make America a multiracial democracy prevail over those who cling to the idea that we are a fundamentally white nation?Q. How did Trump manage to become so powerful within the Republican Party, despite his many flaws that often run counter to traditional Republican beliefs?Q. Why would ANY person of color support Trump? We have a Black U.S. Senator – Tim Scott of South Carolina – who is one of his chief sycophants and apparently hopes to be Trump’s vice presidential running-mate.Q. Trump is continuing his tirade against immigrants and even sabotaged what turned out to be a bipartisan immigration reform bill that would have helped end the crisis at the southern border. That’s part of his Make America White Again agenda, right?Q. Do you believe that most Americans want to see a multiracial democracy, or do you believe that’s a pipedream?Q. How is it that Stacy Abrams lost her bid for governor of Georgia, but Rev. Raphael Warnock won his Senate seat there?Q. In your book, you write that modern day conservatives, and many liberals, promote the idea that Black people are poor because they lack the necessary skills, training, or character to get good jobs or run businesses that can generate wealth. Your response to that?Q. Do you believe Democrats have been strong enough in refuting the Republican effort to overthrow the U.S. government? Why? What should they do?Q. What would be the consequence if Trump should defeat Biden and return to the presidency?Q. What should progressives and Democrats do to defeat Trump, hold the Senate majority and regain control of the House of Representatives? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
Uncover the truth about Racism in the Doctor's Office as Dr. Sanlare Gordon sheds light on systemic discrimination and its impact on healthcare for people of color.A recent national survey indicates that many Black, Hispanic and other minority individuals experience some form of discrimination or racism when they seek health care.Since 63.9% of active physicians identify as white, while only 20.6% are Asian, 6.9% Hispanic, and only 5.7% as Black or African American, could this be a reason they experience racism in the doctor’s office?Dr. Sanlare Gordon, board-certified in obstetrics and gynecology, discusses this form of discrimination and racism on the Lean to the Left podcast. She is a staff physician at Pandia Health, the only women-founded and women-led birth control delivery service, and serves as a traveling OBGYN physician, filling in where there is a need -- especially in small and rural communities where doctors are in short supply.Why is it that women of color feel that they are the victims of racism in so many health care settings?"The true answer is systemic racism, and we're still dealing with systemic racism, because there was absolutely a time to where blacks and Hispanics and indigenous people just weren't even allowed into medical schools," she says."And then finally there were medical schools that would allow us to be there, but it wasn't the majority. There will be like, okay, one or two per class. We do now have historically black colleges and universities that do have medical schools."Then, she says, of the medical schools that are out there, "we don't have that many. In my class, we had 160 people. In my class of 160, it was eight black people. And I know that I can name all of them. They're all in my phone. So it's just really and truly not that many of us being actually admitted into the schools."To change that, Dr. Gordon says more emphasis needs to be placed on teaching minority students how to take standardized tests and that more people of color should be hired for administrative positions, including in the medical school admissions process.Dr. Gordon's interview is filled with humor and anecdotes about her experience as she discusses the impact of racism on people of color, particularly women, in the doctor's office or other medical facility. She talks about how Black or Hispanic women often are uncomfortable sharing their private medical concerns with white male doctors, and how often their conditions are misdiagnosed because of racial bias -- and how that can lead to worsening conditions or even death. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
Unless our political leaders demonstrate both wisdom and political courage, Social Security will run out of money in nine years and beneficiaries will see their checks slashed automatically by 25 percent.  And that will mean an average annual reduction of $17,000 or $18,000 per year, according to James B. Lockhart III, former Principal Deputy Commissioner and Chief Operating Officer of the Social Security Administration during the administration of President George W. Bush.  “Either Congress can reform the program or at that point, it would take half a trillion dollars a year to make up for the difference of promised benefits,” says Lockhart on the Lean to the Left podcast. “What happens is, there's a trust fund and the trust fund was built up over the years. In the ‘83 reforms, the Greenspan reforms, they changed the retirement age and did some other things very slowly.“And that trust fund is starting to be eaten into today because effectively the government borrowed the money from Social Security. And so now the government's paying back all of those bonds and in nine years, the bonds will disappear. The trust fund will disappear and there'll be a hole of a half a trillion dollars a year and growing every year thereafter.So, how can Social Security be saved?“The only way to cover that hole is reform," says Lockhart. "Our Congress has to pass a law that says, oh yeah, we're gonna spend another half a trillion dollars a year. Where they're gonna get that half a trillion given the deficits and the debt outstanding is a very big question.”  Because it takes courage for politicians, including the president and members of Congress, to take the tough action needed to preserve Social Security for generations to come, they keep delaying action to avoid losing support from seniors and those nearing retirement age.  A combination of both benefit and tax reform will be necessary to put Social Security on solid ground, says Lockhart, who calls for creation of a special commission to examine and reform federal entitlement programs, including Social Security and Medicare. Resulting recommendations would be put before Congress for an up-or-down vote.But even that takes guts.Currently, President Biden and Donald Trump both promise not to cut benefits or raise the retirement age, and Biden says his tax reform proposals – to increase corporate taxes and taxes on the wealthy -- would not affect anyone earning less than $400,000 per year.Both are wrong in their approach, says Lockhart, explaining that less than 2 percent of Americans earn $400, 000 a year, so much more revenue would be needed.About James B. Lockhart IIIAuthor of the award-winning book, "America Underwater and Sinking”, Lockhart, who once served as an officer aboard a U.S. Navy nuclear submarine, is a senior fellow of the Bipartisan Policy Center. He served as the director of the federal housing finance agency, regulator of Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, the federal home loan banks and its predecessor agency, the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight, as well as the Pension Benefit Guarantee Corporation.During the George W. Bush administration, Lockhart co-chaired the Bipartisan Policy Commission on Retirement Security, which developed recommendations that he says would have put Social Security on solid footing forever. However, most of those recommendations have not been enacted because of the political risks involved.What are Lockhart’s recommendations? What steps should be taken to save Social Security and prevent that automatic 25 percent benefit cut once the Trust Fund dries up?Watch this episode to find out.Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.Check out this episode of the Dixie Dems on the Lean to the Left podcast, recorded just prior to Super Tuesday when Con-man Donald Trump delivered a knockout blow to Nikki Haley in the GOP presidential sweepstakes.Despite Haley's defeat and the fact that she's withdrawn from the race, there is talk on this episode of how she could still manage to win the GOP nod if Trump is convicted of at least one of the 91 felony charges against him. Should that happen, would worried Republicans turn to Haley instead?"Let's say that Trump goes into the convention as a convicted felon (and) enough Republicans who they're at the convention say, I can't support a convicted felon, right?", suggests Dixie Dem Arthur Hill of North Carolina."So switching my vote to Nikki Haley and Haley comes out of the convention as the as the candidate. And I think that's bad news for Democrats because I think Nikki Haley has a much better shot at beating Biden than Trump does," he says.And what about Fulton County, GA prosecutor Fani T. Willis? Will she be kicked off the Georgia case involving Con-man Don's attempts to overturn the 2020 election in her state? If so, what happens then?"Not a damn thing," says Dixie Dem Robert Thompson, of Georgia.There's much more.The conversation turns to the fact that Georgia Republican Congressman Barry Loudermilk led a tour of the Capitol basement on Jan. 5, 2020, the day before the MAGA attack on the Capitol -- something that could have aided protestors' efforts to interfere with the official vote count. Meanwhile, Loudermilk voted to impeach Homeland Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas over immigration issues.Hill talks about the new North Carolina Democratic Party chair, Anderson Clayton, 26, who is determined to generate Democratic support among young and rural voters. And, says Hill, answering voters who say they can't vote for Biden, Clayton responds by saying, "We can push Joe Biden if he's not as progressive as we want him to be, but we cannot push Donald Trump. We can't push a Donald Trump who doesn't want young people to have a right to vote. We can't push a Donald Trump. Who doesn't want young people to have a right to abortion. We can push a president who cares about and believes in young people.""She's full of those kinds of quotes," says Hill. "She's a tremendous orator and and she's she's creating a lot of excitement up here. And I think it's going to bode well for the Democrats in North Carolina in November."Even pop star Taylor Swift finds herself in this episode, as Dixie Dem Bob Gatty, of South Carolina, points out that she's being accused by Republicans of being part of a covert government effort to defeat Con-man Trump.It's another entertaining episode of the Dixie Dems. Check it out.
Since his election defeat to President Biden in November 2020, Donald Trump has put America through virtual hell, claiming Biden stole the election, inciting the attempt by his MAGA mob to prevent certification of that election, and despite 91 criminal charges against him, attempting to win the Republican nomination and return to the White House. Those charges stem from his attempts to overturn the election, interfering with the election results in Georgia, falsifying business records in New York, including hush money payments to porn star Stormy Daniels, and mishandling classified records after leaving the presidency.He's been fined hundreds of millions of dollars so far, and his financial empire is jeopardized to the point that he’s hawking a garish line of gold sneakers for $399 a pair – that he says Black people should like because they love sneakers.But what's ahead for Donald Trump?When those court cases are all finished, will he serve even one day in prison? What if he's convicted of a felony? He would be unable to vote for himself, but could serve as President, says David H. Moskowitz, a retired Pennsylvania attorney who’s written a new book, “The Judge and the President: Stealing the 2020 Election.”In this episode of the Lean to the Left podcast, we get his take on all of these developments and what Moskowitz believes might lie ahead for Trump -- and our nation.Moskowitz analyzes the four major cases against Trump which involved 91 charges stemming from his attempts to overturn the election, interfering with Georgia election results, fraudulently falsifying business records in New York, and mishandling classified records after leaving the presidency.The Bottom LineMoskowitz predicts Trump will be convicted in the federal election interference and estimates that there is a less than 50 percent chance that an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court would be successful. However, he believes that case will not be resolved until after the November election.In the Georgia case, Moskowitz predicts that the trial will last six to nine months, and that if he is convicted, he will appeal. However, if that case goes to the U.S. Supreme Court, he says Trump's chances for success are less than 15 percent.Regarding the classified documents case, Moskowitz predicts that Trump will escape conviction, and that the New York case involving hush money payments to adult porn star Stormy Daniels is likely to end up with a hung jury.He also predicts that Trump will be forced to cough up the $454 million judgements against him in the New York business case involving alleged fraudulent estimates of the value of his properties.Further, Moskowitz predicts that ultimately Trump will be allowed by the Supreme Court to remain on the 2024 presidential election ballot, despite efforts by some states to declare him ineligible.Moreover, Moskowitz suggests that Trump may end up agreeing to a plea deal that would allow him to avoid jail time but include an agreement that he will no longer seek public office.Moskowitz practiced law for 40-plus years, developed real estate, and was a pharmaceutical CEO. He received degrees from Penn State, Villanova Law School and Oxford University. He served as counsel to municipalities, municipal authorities, civic associations, and represented clients in numerous countries around the world.He writes based on his legal experience and front row seat to the election – his wife was a Pennsylvania elector -- and efforts by Trump and his allies to overturn the results.What's Ahead for Donald Trump?Here are some key questions we discussed with Moskowitz to answer that question:--What are the key points that you make in your book regarding Trump, the election, and the aftermath?What would be the consequences to our country had Trump succeeded in preventing the peaceful transfer of power after he lost the election?In your book, you describe three heroes from the Jan. 6 insurrection. Who were they and why?Can we walk through the four cases involving Trump and what you think lies ahead? First, the federal election interference case led by special counsel Jack Smith. What are the key charges and what do you believe will happen here?Let’s move to the Georgia election interference case. Give us your analysis of that and what you think the outcome might be.How about the classified documents case. Do you believe this is as serious as the others? Is Trump at risk of being sent to prison over this?What about the hush money case in which Trump is accused of falsifying business records relating to a $130,000 payoff to buy Stormy Daniels’ silence. There are 34 felony counts in this case.Trump is appealing a $454 million judgement against him, which includes being barred from serving as a leadership role in any New York business for three years. What’s the likely outcome here?And then there’s the $83.3 million Trump was ordered to pay to writer E. Jean Carroll for ruining her credibility as an advice columnist when he called her a liar after she accused him of sexual assault. Your thoughts about that one?What do you think of the efforts in some states to kick him off the ballot?What impact will these cases have on Trump’s bid to return to the White House?He says Black Americans should relate to his criminal indictments and so should support him. What do you think about that?Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
Uncover the truth about America's status as an empire in the insightful interview with British author Patrick Watts. Is America an empire? Find out now.British author Patrick Watts has published a new book called “The End of the American Empire,” in which he warns that unless some of the issues that beset our country are resolved, the “American empire” will collapse.What lies ahead for our country unless changes are made? Is America an empire?Watts writes that “The wounds of the past cannot be healed through ignoring the fact they ever occurred, but neither through an endless cycle of guilt, apology and revenge.“In an increasingly divisive, fraught political climate full of hyperbole, accusation, and online echo chambers, the American people need to remember who they are and why they have ruled the world for almost a century."He says that with the possible return of Donald Trump to the presidency, "the lessons of this book must be learnt now.”Patrick is based in London and joins us from there. With degrees in history and international relations, he is a non-partisan observer eager to help Americans navigate what he believes is a crucial and perilous moment in our nation’s history.Patrick’s book addresses the current climate as the country gears up for the election. Arguing that the United States is best described as an empire, he lays out the historical, political, social and geopolitical reasons why the American empire might collapse sooner rather than later, with huge domestic and global consequences.Some questions we discussed with Watts:· You’re British. Why did focus on the US, and how are you qualified to do so?· Why do you use the term American Empire?· What do you believe is causing the decline of the American Empire?· Why do you believe the American Empire should be prolonged?· How can the fraught political climate in the US be improved?· Do you think the American political model is destined to fail?· Do you believe another American Civil War will occur in your lifetime?· What parallels have you observed with the end of previous Empires with the current situation in the US?· Who do you hope wins the upcoming American presidential election?· Is China the biggest threat to the U.S.?· Which charities will benefit from the sales of your book?· What is the Access Project? How can people get involved?· Where can people learn more about The End of the American Empire and how can they reach out to you?Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
As we see in news headlines and in our own neighborhoods, water crises are more frequent and increasingly severe, and the world’s approach to providing the water that grows food, sustains cities, and supports healthy ecosystems fails to meet the demands of growing population and the water challenges of a changing climate. But the grim news reports of empty reservoirs, withering crops, failing ecosystems need not be cause for despair, argues award-winning author and environmentalist David Sedlak, who is with us on the Lean to the Left podcast.In Water for All: Global Solutions for a Changing Climate, just published by Yale University Press, Sedlak identifies the challenges society faces, including ineffective policies and outdated infrastructure, and the many tools at our disposal. He offers an informed and hopeful approach for changing the way water is managed so we can create a future with clean, abundant, and affordable water for all.Sedlak is the Plato Malozemoff Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and director of the Berkeley Water Center. He is author of the award-winning Water 4.0: The Past, Present, and Future of the World’s Most Vital Resource. "Climate change combined with global development is going to result in (water) crises happening more frequently and being more severe," Sedlak says, "but at the same time, the knowledge that we've accumulated and the technologies that we've developed and are developing give us new answers."(It) depends a lot upon whether we can let go of some of our preconceived notions about how we manage water and take a different path forward in," he adds. "And I think that if we're capable of doing that; if we're capable about seeing this as a time when the status quo no longer works and we have to try something different, there's a chance to come out in a much better place."Here are some key questions we discussed regarding water challenges of a changing climate:Q. Your book starts off discussing the six separate water crises that exist today. How about discussing them?Q. So what are the solutions to these crises?Q. What can be learned from communities that have experienced water crises and the actions they have taken?Q. You talk about the wealthy and their ability to cope with water shortages. But what about those less fortunate like the urban poor and those in rural communities?Q. How can emerging technologies unlock untapped water resources without damaging the environment?Q. You discuss some ideas to expand conventional and unconventional water sources. What are some of the most promising ideas there? Q. Are there places in the world that are practicing good water usage? What can we learn from them?Q. So where do we go next to ensure the best outcome? How do we tackle these areas in concrete, strategic ways? Q. Your last book, Water 4.0, looked at the history of water systems. What did you learn in the decade between Water 4.0 and now that made you want to write this book? Q. Where can people find your book?Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-lean-to-the-left-podcast--4719048/support.
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Comments (4)

Will Shogren

This guy is very good, this podcast is very bad. All power to the workers and to hell with old liberals.

Jan 28th
Reply

Will Shogren

Liberalism is cancer.

Jan 28th
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Will Shogren

25,000 dead and counting at the hands of Israel. A woman like her should be put up against a wall with the rest of her ilk. Free Palestine 🇵🇸

Jan 28th
Reply

Will Shogren

I would wipe my fucking ass with that Zionist's wretched old face. "Lean to the Left"

Jan 28th
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