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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.
1214 Episodes
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From the earliest days of the pandemic, herd immunity has consistently factored into conversations about how countries can find their way out of lockdowns and restrictions.Now, many experts believe that the United States may never reach the requisite level of immunity.We explore why, and what it might look like to live in a country where there is no herd immunity against the coronavirus.Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The emergence of widely circulating coronavirus variants and persistent hesitancy about vaccines will keep the goal out of reach. The virus appears to be here to stay, but vaccinating the most vulnerable may be enough to restore normalcy.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
Was Facebook right to indefinitely bar former President Donald J. Trump from the platform after the Capitol riot?The company’s oversight board, which rules on some of the thorniest speech decisions on the platform, decided that, while the ban was justified at the time, the parameters of the suspension needed to be defined.What does the ruling tell us about Facebook’s “Supreme Court.”Guest: Cecilia Kang, a reporter covering technology and regulatory policy for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Facebook’s company-appointed panel ruled that Facebook should reassess the barring of Mr. Trump and make a final decision in six months.Lawmakers, both Republican and Democrat, have criticized the board’s decision.Here are some central facts to know about the oversight board.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
Japan is the “grayest” nation in the world. Close to 30 percent of the population is over 65. The reason is its low birthrate, which has caused the population to contract since 2007.With the birthrate in the United States also dropping, what are the implications of a shrinking population, and what lessons can be learned from Japan?Guest: Motoko Rich, the Tokyo bureau chief for The New York Times.  Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The contracting population in Japan poses a serious threat to the country’s economic vitality and the security of its social safety net.As Japan’s population shrinks and ages, rural areas are emptying out. In one childless village, two dozen adults compensate for the absence with the company of hundreds of giant handmade dolls.The birthrate in the United States declined for the sixth straight year in 2020 and has fallen by about 19 percent since its recent peak in 2007.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
The latest census revealed that the United States had seen the second-slowest decade of population growth since 1790, when the count began.The country may be entering an era of substantially lower population growth, demographers said.How could this redefine the nation’s future?Guest: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent covering demographics for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The numbers, the product of the most embattled census process in decades, underlined the long-running trend of population gains in the South and West.Here is a roundup of what you need to know about the census results.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
Inside the world of complaint sites and what can be done about the “the bathroom wall of the internet.”Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background: Listen to part one here. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
For years, Dan-el Padilla Peralta, a Dominican-born teacher of classics at Princeton, has spoken openly about the harm caused by the discipline’s practitioners in the two millenniums since antiquity — the classical justifications of slavery, race science, colonialism, Nazism and other 20th-century fascisms.He believes that classics is so entangled with white supremacy as to be inseparable from it.Today on The Sunday Read, how Dr. Padilla is trying to change the way the subject is taught.This story was written by Rachel Poser and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
For at least a decade, allegations of cheating have swirled around elections in rural Bladen County, N.C. Some people point fingers at a Black advocacy group, the Bladen County Improvement Association, accusing it of bullying voters, tampering with ballots and stealing votes outright. These allegations have never been substantiated, but they persist. The reporter Zoe Chace went to Bladen County to investigate what’s really going on. From the makers of Serial and The New York Times, this five-part audio series about allegations of election fraud -- and the powerful forces that fuel them -- is out now. Binge the whole series, and find out more here: https://nytimes.com/improvementassociation
This episode contains references to mental health challenges, including eating disorders.Joanna Lopez, the high school senior we met in our first episode of Odessa, has turned inward: staying in her bedroom, ghosting friends and avoiding band practice. But playing with the marching band at the last football game of her high-school career offers a moment of hope that maybe, one day, things will get better.In the finale of our four-part series, we listen as the public health crisis becomes a mental health crisis in Odessa.
In his first speech to a joint session of Congress, President Biden set out an expansive vision for the role of American government. He spent much of the address detailing his proposals for investing in the nation’s economic future — spending that would total $4 trillion. We analyze the president’s address and his plans for remaking the American economy. Guest: Jim Tankersley, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: President Biden laid out an ambitious agenda on Wednesday night to rewrite the American social contract. Invoking the legacy of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Mr. Biden unveiled a $1.8 trillion social spending plan to accompany previous proposals.Read highlights from the president’s first address to Congress here. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
At the beginning of this year, many people in India thought the worst of the pandemic was finished there. But in the last few weeks, any sense of ease has given way to widespread fear. The country is suffering from the worst coronavirus outbreak in the world, with people being turned away from full hospitals and a scarcity of medical oxygen.  How did India, after successfully containing the virus last year, get to this point?Guest: Jeffrey Gettleman, the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times, based in New Delhi. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: In a dispatch from New Delhi, Jeffrey describes the fear of living amid a disease spreading at such scale and speed.Fatalities have been overlooked or downplayed, understating the human toll of the country’s outbreak, which accounts for nearly half of all new cases in a global surge.The new wave of the virus in India will hurt global efforts and vaccine supplies, experts say. And researchers are scrambling to assess whether new coronavirus variants are playing a role. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
During a global climate summit, President Biden signaled America’s commitment to fighting climate change with an ambitious target: The U.S. will cut its economywide carbon emissions by 50 percent of 2005 levels by 2030.  What became clear is that the rest of the world has become cautious about following the United States’ lead after years of commitments shifting from one administration to the next. What happened at the summit and how can the U.S. regain its credibility in the struggle against climate change?Guest: Coral Davenport, who covers energy and environmental policy for The New York Times, with a focus on climate change.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: At the virtual summit meeting he convened, Mr. Biden cast the fight against global warming as an economic opportunity for the world and committed the U.S. to cutting its carbon emissions by half. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
In recent years, Russia has tried to reassert its global influence in many ways, from military action in Ukraine to meddling in U.S. elections.So when Russia developed a coronavirus vaccine, it prioritized exporting it to dozens of other countries — at the expense of its own people.Today, we look at how Russia has put vaccine diplomacy to work. Guest: Andrew E. Kramer, a reporter based in the Moscow bureau of The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The Kremlin has scored propaganda points and bolstered several longstanding foreign policy goals by offering its Sputnik V vaccine around the world. But production capacity is limited.A microstate surrounded by Italy, San Marino feared being left behind in Europe’s inoculation campaign. Now it has jumped ahead, with the Sputnik vaccine.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
In summer 2003, Shahawar Matin Siraj, then 21, met Osama Eldawoody, a nuclear engineer twice his age. To Mr. Siraj’s delight they struck up an unlikely friendship — never before had someone this sophisticated taken him so seriously.At the older man’s encouragement, Mr. Siraj became entangled in a plot to place a bomb in Herald Square subway station. He would later want out of the plan, but it was too late: Mr. Eldawoody, it turned out, was one of thousands of informants recruited by the police and the F.B.I. after the Sept. 11 attacks.Today on The Sunday Read, did the U.S. government’s network of informants create plots where none existed?This story was written by Rozina Ali and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android. 
This episode contains strong language. On Sunday, 12 elite soccer teams in Europe announced the formation of a super league. The plan was backed by vast amounts of money, but it flew in the face of an idea central to soccer’s identity: You have to earn your place.Fans reacted with blind fury and protest. Players and managers spoke out. Figures like Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain and Prince William expressed disapproval. Within 48 hours, the idea was dead.Amid the rubble, a question was left: What does the future hold for the world’s biggest sport?Guest: Rory Smith, chief soccer correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Frantic phone calls, clandestine meetings and high-stakes threats: The inside story of how a billion-dollar European super league was born, scorned and swept away in less than a week.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
Last spring, Brandon Hole’s mother alerted the police in Indiana about her son’s worrying behavior. Invoking the state’s “red flag” law, officers seized his firearm.But Mr. Hole was able to legally purchase other weapons, and last week, he opened fire on a FedEx facility, killing eight people and then himself.Why did the law fail?Guest: Campbell Robertson, a national correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Red flag laws are supposed to keep guns away from people who should not have them. That did not happen with Mr. Hole.Citing shortcomings of the state’s red flag law, the senior county prosecutor in Indianapolis explained why he did not seek a ruling last year that would have barred Mr. Hole from possessing guns.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
Guilty of All Charges

Guilty of All Charges

2021-04-2132:204

On Tuesday, after three weeks of jury selection, another three weeks of testimony and 10 hours of deliberations, Derek Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, was found guilty of murder in the death of George Floyd.The jurors found Mr. Chauvin guilty of all three charges: second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Sentencing will take place several weeks from now. Second-degree murder could mean as long as 40 years in prison.We look back on key moments from the trial and discuss the reactions to the guilty verdict.Guest: John Eligon, a national correspondent covering race for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The verdict against Mr. Chauvin brought a rare rebuke of police conduct.After the decision, there was a scene of collective relief and satisfaction in Minneapolis.Here are 13 key moments that shaped the trial.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
Just four months into 2021 and there have already been more than 80 bills, introduced in mostly Republican-controlled legislatures, that aim to restrict transgender rights, mostly in sports and medical care.But what’s the thinking behind the laws, and why are there so many?We look into the motivation behind the bills and analyze the impact they could have.Guest: Dan Levin, who covers American youth for The New York Times’s National Desk.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Lawmakers in a growing number of Republican-led states are advancing and passing bills to bar transgender athletes in girls’ sports, a culture clash that seems to have come out of nowhere.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
When a nuclear fuel enrichment site in Iran blew up this month, Tehran immediately said two things: The explosion was no accident, and the blame lay with Israel.Such an independent action by Israel would be a major departure from a decade ago, when the country worked in tandem with the United States to set back Iran’s nuclear ambitions.We look at what the blast says about relations between the United States, Iran and Israel.Guest: David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times.  Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: After the blackout at the nuclear plant in Iran, Tehran threatened reprisals, while Washington denied any involvement in the apparent attack.Iran vowed to increase uranium enrichment in response to the explosion.Another round of talks in Vienna about reviving the 2015 nuclear accord has been positive, despite the feuding over the nuclear plant.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
The Skagit Valley choir last sang together on the evening of March 10, 2020. This rehearsal, it would turn out, was one of the first documented superspreader events of the pandemic. Of the 61 choristers who attended practice that night, 53 developed coronavirus symptoms. Two later died.The event served as an example to other choirs of the dangers of coming together in the pandemic. It also provided crucial evidence for scientists seeking to understand how the coronavirus was being transmitted.Today, a look at the Skagit Valley case and the choir’s road to singing together once again.This story was written and narrated by Kim Tingley. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
This episode contains strong language and emotional descriptions about the challenges of parenting during the pandemic, so if your young child is with you, you might want to listen later.Several months ago, The Times opened up a phone line to ask Americans what it’s really been like to raise children during the pandemic.Liz Halfhill, a single mother to 11-year-old Max, detailed her unvarnished highs and lows over the past year.Guest: Liz Halfhill, a single mother and full-time paralegal, in Spokane, Wash.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The Times followed Liz and two other mothers in different parts of America who shared their experience of pandemic parenting over dozens of interviews. What emerged was a story of chaos and resilience, resentment and persistence, and of course, hope.Take a look at “The Primal Scream,” a series from The Times that examines the pandemic’s effect on working mothers in America.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
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Comments (4827)

Spencer Williams

Real-time viral detection is essential for reopening the economy safely. See DARPA - see Kontrol BioCloud.

May 8th
Reply

Rajiv Jadhav

reputation repair services like what rsquare media offers can get bad press deleted from Google, Facebook, Amazon, etc #reputationrepair #reputationmanagement

May 6th
Reply

jean campbell

Disappointing story. Seems you didn't actually ask any young people about their decision not to have kids. The ones I've talked to are well aware of the risks of climate change and don't want to bring kids into the world that awaits them. Your story didn't even acknowledge that as a possible factor.

May 6th
Reply

Rebecca Pelton

it's so cute when Michael says that women going to work in the US was "accompanied by a redistribution of domestic work"-- ha! why is the slight shifting of responsibility-- in which a man taking their kid to the park or folding laundry once on a while is practically met with public applause-- be celebrated as an entire "redistribution"??

May 6th
Reply

snosaer

🎎🎎

May 5th
Reply

Paulo Lavigne

Interesting episode. Is it my impression or she does pronounce "women" as "woman" all the time?

May 5th
Reply (2)

Wendy Bruder

Kids are expensive and drain your life force. It's no wonder people don't want to have them, myself included. Life is hard and having kids makes it harder. I'd rather enjoy life without that stress. Dogs are wonderful

May 4th
Reply

Abishek Raj

But there's a boom in India's population 😂

May 4th
Reply

The Rabbit Hole

Who needs complaint sites when everyone has a Twitter and Facebook these days? Take cops for example, if they ignore you just shitpost about them violating your rights on their page and they'll wanna talk eventually.

May 3rd
Reply

Kathy Giannini

I was a band kid, and now parent of two recent high school grads - including a 2020 son who missed so much due to the pandemic. This episode had me in tears, especially their last performance.

May 2nd
Reply

Tim

notable study by whom on job creation? are these the same people that said trumps tax cuts would boost the economy? or that Reaganomics trickle down effect works?

Apr 29th
Reply

Tim

can't we just say things are weird and then stop talking about it in ad nauseam!

Apr 29th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

All I could think of was "Sports Go Sports" by Garfunkel and Oates. If you haven't seen it, do yourself a yuge favor and look up that video!

Apr 29th
Reply

Wendy Bruder

Too many people. That's the problem.

Apr 28th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

YES! ✊🏻✊🏿

Apr 27th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

Anti-trans laws are heartbreaking and the people who push them into motion should be ashamed of themselves.

Apr 26th
Reply

Ada Bruguera Riera

Although I agree that the Superleague shouldn't happen, let's not kid ourselves: UEFA and National league representstives aren't against it for some romantic idea of what football should be. They are against it because they would lose power and money. Football, in it's highest circles, has been absolutley corrupt for years. It's not a fight of old ways vs money, it's a fight of power of money vs. money.

Apr 24th
Reply

VMay

Highly dispute the comment that over the last 30 years the monetisation largely went unchallenged. When the Glazers took over Man U - there was uproar. As with Arsenal and Liverpool. There were major questions asked of what this would mean. The ones that didn't go unchallenged were the likes of Chelsea and Man City as for these fans, for the first time, it meant they could actually compete to win. Chelsea and Man City were largely mid-tier teams before the.money came in.

Apr 24th
Reply

Ramona Chavez

I

Apr 22nd
Reply

Christine Olson

888888ooo8 I Is 8ooo8oolips ooo78 I'm 9o8oI 9.9 80s I 9ooopo9i0 lo o I io99o9 I only 8th 99iooo7o9oto oo6oo8k I ooo8ooo7o I o9 I o9 If oo

Apr 21st
Reply
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