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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.
1250 Episodes
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Day X, Part 4: Franco A.

Day X, Part 4: Franco A.

2021-06-1842:083

We meet Franco A., an officer in the German military who lived a double life as a Syrian refugee and stands accused of plotting an act of terrorism to bring down the German government.
In 2019, it seemed to many that Gov. Ralph Northam’s career was over.That year, the Democratic governor of Virginia became embroiled in a highly publicized blackface scandal centered on a racist picture in his medical-school yearbook. There were widespread calls for his resignation.Two years later, Mr. Northam has emerged as the most racially progressive leader in the state’s history. How did it happen?Guest: Astead W. Herndon, a national political reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: When a racist picture was discovered on his yearbook page, Ralph Northam refused to resign. Now he’s leaving office with a widely praised progressive record on racial justice.Virginia’s governor survived a blackface scandal with the help of Black Democrats, who saw a chance for policy concessions. Both got more from the relationship than they could have imagined.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
The War in Tigray

The War in Tigray

2021-06-1628:553

This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence.Just a few years ago, Ethiopia’s leader was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Now, the nation is in the grips of a civil war, with widespread reports of massacres and human rights abuses, and a looming famine that could strike millions in the northern region of Tigray. How did Ethiopia get here?Guest: Declan Walsh, the chief Africa correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Thousands of Ethiopians have fled the country and given accounts of a devastating and complex conflict. A U.S. report found that officials are leading a systematic campaign of ethnic cleansing in the northern region of Tigray.United Nations agencies have said the crisis in the Tigray region had plunged it into famine. It’s  a starvation calamity bigger at the moment than anywhere else in the world.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
Jeff Bezos, Michael Bloomberg, Elon Musk and George Soros are household names. They are among the wealthiest people in the United States.But a recent report by ProPublica has found another thing that separates them from regular Americans citizens: They have paid almost nothing in taxes.Why does the U.S. tax system let that happen?Guest: Jonathan Weisman, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: An analysis by ProPublica showed that from 2014 to 2018, the nation’s richest executives paid just a fraction of their wealth in taxes — $13.6 billion in federal income taxes during a time when their collective net worth reportedly increased by $401 billion.The exposé has refocused attention on the tax code and how it applies to the superrich.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
Apple’s Bet on China

Apple’s Bet on China

2021-06-1433:514

Apple built the world’s most valuable business by figuring out how to make China work for Apple.A New York Times investigation has found that the dynamic has now changed. China has figured out how to make Apple work for China.Guest: Jack Nicas, who covers technology from San Francisco for The New York Times. He is one of the reporters behind the investigation into Apple’s compromises in China.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: An investigation from The New York Times offers an extensive inside look at how Apple has given in to escalating demands from the Chinese authorities.One of the compromises Apple made to China was storing its Chinese customers’ data on servers controlled by the Chinese government. Here are four more takeaways from the report.In the United States, data requests have placed Apple and other tech giants in an uncomfortable position between law enforcement, the courts and the customers whose privacy they have promised to protect.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
During months of pandemic isolation, Wesley Morris, a critic at large for The New York Times, decided to grow a mustache.The reviews were mixed and predictable. He heard it described as “porny” and “creepy,” as well as “rugged” and “extra gay.”It was a comment on a group call, however, that gave him pause. Someone noted that his mustache made him look like a lawyer for the N.A.A.C.P.’s legal defense fund.“It was said as a winking correction and an earnest clarification — Y’all, this is what it is,” Wesley said. “The call moved on, but I didn’t. That is what it is: one of the sweetest, truest things anybody had said about me in a long time.”On today’s episode of The Sunday Read, Wesley Morris’s story about Blackness and the symbolic power of the mustache.This story was written by Wesley Morris and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
Franco A. is not the only far-right extremist in Germany discovered by chance. For over a decade, 10 murders in the country, including nine victims who were immigrants, went unsolved. The neo-Nazi group responsible was discovered only when a bank robbery went wrong. In this episode, we ask: Why has a country that spent decades atoning for its Nazi past so often failed to confront far-right extremism?
When she was at graduate school in the 1970s, Dr. Katalin Kariko learned about something that would become a career-defining obsession: mRNA.She believed in the potential of the molecule, but for decades ran up against institutional roadblocks. Then, the coronavirus hit and her obsession would help shield millions from a once-in-a-century pandemic. Today, a conversation with Dr. Kariko about her journey. Guest: Gina Kolata, a reporter covering science and medicine for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Collaborating with devoted colleagues, Dr. Kariko laid the groundwork for the mRNA vaccines turning the tide of the pandemic.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
The Senate passed the largest piece of industrial policy seen in the U.S. in decades on Tuesday, directing about a quarter of a trillion dollars to bolster high-tech industries.In an era where lawmakers can’t seem to agree on anything, why did they come together for this?Guest: David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times.  Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. The Daily is doing a live online event: We follow up with students and faculty from our series Odessa. And we hear from the team who made the documentary. Times subscribers can join us June 10.Background reading: The wide margin of support in the Senate reflects a sense of urgency among lawmakers in both parties about shoring up the technological and industrial capacity of the United States.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
In the past few weeks, some of the biggest industries in the U.S. have been held up by cyberattacks.The first big infiltration was at Colonial Pipeline, a major conduit of gas, jet fuel and diesel to the East Coast. Then, J.B.S., one of the world’s largest beef suppliers, was hit.The so-called ransomware attacks have long been a worry. But who are the hackers and how can they be stopped?Guest: Nicole Perlroth, a reporter covering cybersecurity and digital espionage for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. The Daily is doing a live online event: We follow up with students and faculty from our series Odessa. And we hear from the team who made the documentary. Times subscribers can join us June 10.Background reading: The Biden administration has taken steps to counter the growing threat of cyberattacks on U.S. businesses. The F.B.I. director compares the danger of ransomware to the 9/11 terror threat.As the ransomware industry exploded, a Russian-speaking outfit called DarkSide offered would-be computer criminals not just the tools, but also customer support. Here’s how the group became a hacking powerhouse.It’s been almost a decade since Leon Panetta, then the secretary of defense, warned of an impending “Cyber Pearl Harbor.” He didn’t want to be right.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
Will Netanyahu Fall?

Will Netanyahu Fall?

2021-06-0729:564

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel has always sold himself as a peerless defender of his country. In the minds of many Israelis, he has become a kind of indispensable leader for the nation’s future.Despite that image, Mr. Netanyahu, Israel’s longest-serving prime minister, might soon be ousted from office.What has given his rivals the momentum to try to topple him? And who might be his replacement?Guest: David M. Halbfinger, who covered Israel, the occupied Palestinian territories and the Middle East as the Jerusalem bureau chief of The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. The Daily is doing a live online event: We follow up with students and faculty from our series Odessa. And we hear from the team who made the documentary. Times subscribers can join us June 10.Background reading: Mr. Netanyahu, a dominant figure who has pushed his nation’s politics to the right, is on the verge of losing power.The main players in the latest twist in Israeli politics have very different agendas, but one common goal. Can they change Israel?For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
Andrea Smith had long been an outspoken activist and academic in the Native American community. Called an icon of “Native American feminism,” she was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize for her advocacy work and has aligned herself with prominent activists such as Angela Davis.Last fall, however, a number of academics, including Ms. Smith, were outed as masquerading as Black, Latino or Indigenous.While many of them explained themselves and the lies they told, Ms. Smith never did. Why?This story was written by Sarah Viren and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
On this episode of The Ezra Klein Show, former President Barack Obama discusses Joe Biden, aliens and what he got right and wrong during his two terms in office.Each Tuesday and Friday for The New York Times Opinion section, Ezra Klein invites you into a conversation on something that matters. Subscribe to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.
Franco A. visited the workplaces of two of his alleged targets. We meet both targets to hear the stories of two Germanies: One a beacon of liberal democracy that has worked to overcome its Nazi past, the other a place where that past is attracting new recruits. Today, we explore how Germany's history is informing the fight for the country’s future.
Over the weekend, months of tension in the Texas Legislature came to a head. A group of Democratic lawmakers got up and left the building before a vote — an act of resistance amid the most conservative Texas legislative session in recent memory. The population of Texas is becoming less old, less white and less Republican, so why is its Legislature moving further right?Guest: Manny Fernandez, the Los Angeles bureau chief for The New York Times. He spent more than nine years covering Texas as the Houston bureau chief.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The recent session that pushed Texas further to the right, at a time when it seemed least likely to do so — as the state becomes younger, less white and less Republican.After Democrats killed a bill to restrict voting in the state, Republicans pledged to pass it in a special legislative session. A new fight looms. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
Representing a vanishing brand of Democratic politics that makes his vote anything but predictable, Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia has become the make-or-break legislator of the Biden era.We explore how and why Mr. Manchin’s vote has become so powerful.Guest: Jonathan Martin, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: In Washington, policy revolves around Joe Manchin. Read Jonathan Martin’s exploration of why the senator likes it that way. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
This episode includes disturbing language including racial slurs.In the early 20th century, Greenwood in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was an epicenter of Black economic influence in the United States. However, in the early hours of June 1, 1921, a white mob — sanctioned by the Tulsa police — swept through the community burning and looting homes and businesses, and killing residents.A century later, the question before Congress, the courts and the United States as a whole is: What would justice look like?Guest: Brent Staples, a member of the New York Times editorial board.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: A century ago, a prosperous Black neighborhood in Tulsa perished at the hands of a white mob. Here is what the massacre destroyed.The three known survivors, who were all children in 1921, offered their firsthand accounts of the race massacre at a hearing in Washington last month.A centennial commission that raised $30 million for a history exhibit center has said the government should be responsible for repaying survivors and their descendants.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
This episode contains strong language. The mysterious story of a German soldier, a faked Syrian identity and a loaded gun in an airport bathroom cracks the door open to a network of far-right extremists inside the German military and the police. They are preparing for the day democracy collapses — a day they call Day X. But just how dangerous are they?See all episodes of Day X at nytimes.com/dayx
Last week, when the pilots on a commercial flight headed for Lithuania told passengers they were about to make an unexpected landing in the Belarusian capital of Minsk many were confused — except Roman Protasevich.The 26-year-old dissident journalist and one Belarus’s biggest enemies sensed what was about to happen.How and why did Belarus force down the plane and arrest Mr. Protasevich? And what comes next? Guest: Anton Troianovski, the Moscow bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The forced landing of a commercial flight on Sunday has put Belarus and its authoritarian leader, Aleksandr Lukashenko, in a new global spotlight. Here’s what you need to know.Disgusted by the brutality of Mr. Lukashenko, Mr. Protasevich bravely embarked at 16 on a life in opposition.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
After 11 days of fighting over the skies of Israel and Gaza, a cease-fire between Hamas and Israel was announced last week.The conflict wrought devastation in Gaza. Yet Hamas’s leaders took to television and declared victory.We look at where the organization comes from and their objectives to understand why it has, for decades, engaged in battles it knows it can’t win.Guest: Ben Hubbard, the Beirut bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: After the cease-fire, in addition to relief, some Gaza residents felt a sense of déjà vu, having survived several recent wars with Israel. After each war, it takes years for Gaza to recover.Israel’s military said its airstrikes killed dozens of senior Hamas operatives and destroyed critical military infrastructure. But victory is hard to measure.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
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Comments (4921)

Jemi Assefa

what a very selective way to tell the story.

Jun 17th
Reply

Sabian

Govenor of my state. Proud that he lead us through the pandemic and he's been progressive on criminal justice reform.

Jun 17th
Reply

MrCalPoly

pandemic made it clear to the average American how much china had control. i like idea of healthy competition to push innovation but i fear the anti-china ferver that it will come with this new era.

Jun 17th
Reply (2)

Todd Hansen

Quite possibly one of the most illiterate takes on the tax code and finance I've heard in years.

Jun 16th
Reply (1)

Gene

The pandemic 2020-2021 is one of the most miserable times in modern history. mRNA is the most effective vaccine that allows many of us to head back to normal lives. But the journey of discovering mRNA by Dr. Katalin Kariko is absolutely amazing and moving. Her contribution should be recognized by all of us. I recommend this episode to everyone.

Jun 14th
Reply

Sasha Lyn

Vocal fry is extremely grating on the ears.

Jun 14th
Reply

Vishaal Bhatnagar

Amazing belief and perseverance! Great episode.

Jun 12th
Reply (1)

Jeramy Jasmann

Excellent insight into how having China as our global adversary could be the catalyst we need to overcome the partisan divide.

Jun 10th
Reply

Nada Clontz

A very interesting article and fantastic reading by Julia Whelan!

Jun 8th
Reply

ID17606932

10,000 Supperless Babes

Jun 6th
Reply

Warren Daly

This is not very good unfortunately

Jun 4th
Reply

BB

Love this show & all the content you produce - THANK YOU to the whole production team!! Can we talk about the 1985 Philly bombings next? Let's not wait 100 years, as we did for Tulsa 🖤🙏🏽

Jun 2nd
Reply

LindDes

Rural Democrats like me think that Democrats like Joe are the key to bringing the country together. Possibly even turning the country BLUE. So many Democrats are making rural America feel that they are not represented....Joe is different. He represents us rural Democrats. That is what we NEED!!!

Jun 2nd
Reply (8)

Angie Hebert (said like Abear)

I had no idea that this took place. I am so sorry for the individuals that went through this horrible atrocity. I've never been bought to tears by a podcast but this is atrocious and we need Reparations for any and all black Americans who didn't come to this country of their own free will. I'd give 20% of my household income as should all other 'immigrants' who came to America of their own free will. People were literally kidnapped from their homes and had their entire lives stolen away. Then, when they tried to build their own communities, this kind of shit happens. American's who don't feel heartbroken, well, I just don't understand?

Jun 2nd
Reply

Ina Sordidworld

I miss the #SundayRead so much!

May 30th
Reply (1)

失魂魚🐟

Tell me, how ridiculous this world could be? I'm getting lost day by day 😓😓

May 29th
Reply

Steve Hoshor

What is that piano music at the end of the episode?

May 28th
Reply

MYRONGRI GRI

this is certain pod about hamas isn't informative but only propaganda

May 27th
Reply

Doha Hashish

what's your problem with an islamic state? you don't know how fair islam is!!!! again you keep repeating what you are hearing without going deep into the teachings of islam! and yes Hamas should be there to eliminate Israel because Israel is "an occupier" don't you read history!? enough!!!!

May 26th
Reply

Doha Hashish

no!!!!!!! Israel is the terrorist group in Palestine not Hamas. If your country was occupied, would you stand still without trying to expel the aggressor!??? Hamas is trying to get back their land, and they have have all thr right to do so! and BTW about that holy day that is being disgraced, Israel is turning all holy and nig holy days to hell for Palestinians. One mire thing, if Jihad is sth you in the west don't like, you should distinguish between the right Jihad, which is of Hsmas, and the wrong kbe, which we as Muslims as well refuse snd denounce... Correct your knowledge and stop repeating without understanding...

May 26th
Reply
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