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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.
1279 Episodes
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Extreme weather across Europe, North America and Asia is highlighting a harsh reality of science and history: The world as a whole is neither prepared to slow down climate change nor live with it.European officials are trying to change that. The European Commission, the E.U.’s executive arm, recently introduced ambitious legislation aimed at sharply cutting emissions to slow down climate change within the next decade, specifically by weaning one of the world’s biggest and most polluting economies off fossil fuels. But can it generate the political will to see it through?Guest: Somini Sengupta, the international climate reporter for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Our climate correspondent explains what you need to know about the implications of recent extreme weather events for rich countries.Want to learn more about the science behind climate change? Here are some answers to the big questions, like how we know we’re really in a climate crisis.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
A promise of a well-paying assignment abroad for retired Colombian soldiers. A security company in Miami. An evangelical Haitian American pastor with lofty ideas. Trying to join the dots in the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse took us from the Caribbean to South America to Florida — and there are still plenty of questions.Guest: Julie Turkewitz, the Andes bureau chief for The New York Times, and Frances Robles, a national and foreign correspondent for The Times based in Florida.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Interviews with more than a dozen people suggest that the suspects had been working together for months — but to what end is still mysterious.One suspect was said to have claimed he was “sent by God” to help Haiti.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
The Chinese government’s hacking of Microsoft was bold and brazen.The Biden administration tried to orchestrate a muscular and coordinated response with Western allies. But while the U.S. has responded to cyberattacks from Russia with economic sanctions, when it comes to Beijing, the approach is more complicated.Why does the U.S. take a different course with China?Guest: David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The Biden administration organized a broad group of allies to condemn Beijing for cyberattacks around the world but stopped short of taking concrete punitive steps.Over the past decade, China has transformed into a sophisticated and mature cyber threat to the U.S.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
Is misinformation on Facebook an impediment to ending the pandemic?President Biden even said that platforms like Facebook, by harboring skepticism about the shots, were killing people.Facebook immediately rejected the criticism, but who is right?Guest: Cecilia Kang, a correspondent covering technology and regulatory policy for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Mr. Biden’s blunt statement about Facebook capped weeks of frustration in the White House over the spread of vaccine disinformation on social media.In response, Facebook called on the administration to stop “finger-pointing.”For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
The rise of the Delta variant has prompted a thorny question: Do we need a booster dose of the vaccine for Covid-19? Vaccine makers think so, but regulators are yet to be convinced.Principles are also at stake: Should richer countries be talking about administering extra doses when so many people around the world are yet to receive even a single shot?Guest: Rebecca Robbins, a business reporter covering Covid-19 vaccines for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Although studies of a third dose are underway, experts agree that the vaccines are still working well. Here’s what to know about the potential booster dose.U.S. officials said that the decision to go ahead with a booster shot would depend partly on how many infections cause serious disease or hospitalization in vaccinated people.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
It made headlines around the world: a New Jersey sandwich shop with a soaring stock price. Was it just speculation, or something stranger?This story was written by Jesse Barron and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
This episode contains accounts of physical and sexual abuse.The residential school system was devised by the Canadian government under the auspices of education, but very little education took place. Instead, children were taken from their families in order to wipe out Indigenous languages and culture.In 1959, when Garry Gottfriedson was 5, he was sent to one such school: Kamloops Indian Residential School.On today’s episode, we hear his story and explore how Indigenous activists have agitated for accountability and redress from the federal government.Guest: Ian Austen, a correspondent covering Canada for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Two gruesome discoveries of what Indigenous groups say are the remains of hundreds of children have strengthened the groups’ resolve to hold Canada accountable for a long-hidden brutal history.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
This episode contains strong language.It was a surprise to many recently when protesters took to the streets in a small town near Havana to express their grievances with Cuba’s authoritarian government. Cubans do not protest in huge numbers.Even more remarkable: The protests spread across the island.Why are Cubans protesting, and what happens next?Guest: Ernesto Londoño, the Brazil bureau chief for The New York Times, covering the southern cone of South America. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Thousands of Cubans have taken to the streets in cities around their country to protest food and medicine shortages, in a remarkable eruption of discontent not seen in nearly 30 years.Security forces arrested dozens of protesters after a wave of demonstrations on Sunday. But dissidents expressed hope the protests would lead to lasting change.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
The heat wave that hit the usually cool and rainy American Pacific Northwest was a shock to many — Oregon and Washington were covered by a blanket of heat in the triple digits.After the temperatures soared, a group of scientists quickly came together to answer a crucial question: How much is climate change to blame?Guest: Henry Fountain, a climate change reporter for The New York Times; and Sergio Olmos, a freelancer for The Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: An analysis of the recent record-breaking heat found that it would have been virtually impossible without the influence of human-caused climate change.The extreme temperatures in Oregon, Washington State and Canada were exacerbated by an intense drought. Here is what to know about these heat waves.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
In its investigation of the Trump Organization’s financial affairs, the Manhattan district attorney’s office has zeroed in on Allen Weisselberg, the company’s former finance chief, who spent almost half a century working for the Trump family. Criminal charges have been brought against Mr. Weisselberg in the hopes of getting him to cooperate in an investigation of former President Donald Trump. Will he flip?Guest: Ben Protess, an investigative reporter for The New York Times; and Michael Rothfeld, an investigative reporter for The Times’s Metro Desk. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The Trump Organization has been charged with running a 15-year scheme to help its executives evade taxes by compensating them with fringe benefits that were hidden from the authorities.In nearly half a century of service to Mr. Trump’s family businesses, Allen Weisselberg has survived — and thrived — by anticipating and carrying out his boss’s dictates in a zealous mission to protect the bottom line. His fealty has now landed him in serious legal jeopardy. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
For decades, the granting of racial reparations in the United States appeared to be a political nonstarter. But Evanston, Ill., recently became the first city to approve a program of reparations for its Black residents.How did this happen, and can it be replicated in other parts of the country? Guest: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The proposal in Evanston in March was pioneering: a blueprint to begin distributing $10 million in reparations to Black residents of the city in the form of housing grants.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
For Aleksander Doba, pitting himself against the wide-open sea — storms, sunstroke, monotony, hunger and loneliness — was a way to feel alive in old age. Today, listen to the story of a man who paddled toward the existential crisis that is life and crossed the Atlantic alone in a kayak. Three times.Mr. Doba died on Feb. 22 on the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, Africa. He was 74.This story was written by Elizabeth Weil and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
Early on Wednesday morning, a group of men killed President Jovenel Moïse of Haiti in his residence on the outskirts of the capital, Port-au-Prince.It was a brazen act. Very rarely is a nation’s leader killed in at home.What does the attack means for Haiti’s future?Guest: Maria Abi-Habib, bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The assassination of Mr. Moïse has rocked his nation, stoking fear and confusion about what is to come. Here is what we know and don’t know.The killing has left a political void and deepened the turmoil and violence that has gripped Haiti for months, threatening to tip one of the world’s most troubled nations further into lawlessness.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
After a 20-year war, the United States has effectively ended its operations in Afghanistan with little fanfare.In recent weeks, the Americans have quietly vacated their sprawling military bases in the nation, and without giving Afghan security forces prior notice.What does this withdrawal look like on the ground?Guest: Thomas Gibbons-Neff, a correspondent in the Kabul bureau for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The Americans have handed over Bagram Air Base — once the military’s nerve center — to the Afghans, effectively ending operations.Just a mile from the base, where U.S. forces departed on Thursday, shops sell items left over from two decades of fighting. Each one tells a story.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
When the F.D.A. approved the drug Aduhelm, the first Alzheimer’s treatment to receive the agency’s endorsement in almost two decades, it gave hope to many.But the decision was contentious; some experts say there’s not enough evidence that the treatment can address cognitive symptoms.What is the story behind this new drug?Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times.  Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Aduhelm, also known as aducanumab, was approved despite opposition from the F.D.A.’s independent advisory committee and some Alzheimer’s experts.Even those who supported the F.D.A.’s approval have said that authorizing it for anyone with the disease is much too broad.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
The Rise of Delta

The Rise of Delta

2021-07-0623:2815

The Delta variant of the coronavirus is threatening to put the world in an entirely new stage of the pandemic.The variant is spreading fast, particularly in places with low vaccination rates — it is thought to be around 50 percent more transmissible than previous versions.What can be done to stop Delta, and how will the variant hamper global efforts to return to normalcy?Guest: Carl Zimmer, a science writer and author of the “Matter” column for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Vaccines are driving down coronavirus case numbers in the U.S., but it’s unclear whether Delta will reverse that trend. Here’s what scientists know about it.Conflicting advice from the health authorities about masks has bewildered a worried public.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
In Loudoun County, Va., a fierce debate has been raging for months inside normally sleepy school board meetings.At the heart of this anger is critical race theory, a once obscure academic framework for understanding racism in the United States.How, exactly, did critical race theory enter American public life, and what does this debate look like on the ground?Guest: Trip Gabriel, a national correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: In a culture-war brawl that has spilled into the country’s education system, Republicans at the local, state and national levels are trying to block curriculums that emphasize systemic racism.More than 20 states have introduced legislation restricting lessons on racism and other so-called divisive concepts.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
Throughout its 115-year history, the N.C.A.A.’s bedrock principle has been that student-athletes should be amateurs and not allowed to profit off their fame.This week, after years of agitation and legislation, the rule was changed.What will this new era of college sports look like?Guest: Alan Blinder, a reporter covering college sports for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Here’s a breakdown of why the N.C.A.A. finally relented to pressure to allow athletes to make money beyond the cost of attending their universities.Despite the N.C.A.A’s argument that payments would be a threat to amateurism, this month, the Supreme Court backed payments to student-athletes.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
Inside the U.F.O. Report

Inside the U.F.O. Report

2021-06-3029:188

Recently, the government released a long-awaited report: a look at unexplained aerial phenomena.We explore the report and what implications it may have. Will it do anything to quell theories of extraterrestrial visitors?Guest: Julian E. Barnes, a national security reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The United States has no explanation for unidentified objects, but the report stops short of ruling out aliens.Rather than explaining when sightings of U.F.O.s were really just sightings of top-secret planes, the government has sometimes allowed public eagerness about the possibility of aliens to take hold.U.F.O.s were once a taboo topic for the federal government, but not anymore. Why are we all talking about them now?For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
A few years ago, engineers sounded alarm bells about Champlain Towers, a residential building in Surfside, Fla. Last week, disaster struck and the towers collapsed. At least 11 residents have been confirmed dead and 150 more are still unaccounted for.What caused the building to fail, and why are so many people still missing?Guest: Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The collapse of Champlain Towers may be one of the deadliest accidental collapses in American history. Here are the key facts.Some engineers looking at the building’s failure said that the collapse appeared to have begun somewhere near the bottom of the structure.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
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Comments (4973)

Philly Burbs

We knew since day one boosters would be needed in 6 months. Why should we get sick because Republicans refuse to get any or they are not available globally. this is going to be Biden's Katrina. We have vacs in the US that are expiring. Bullshit. Look at Isreal. They all need Boosters. Because the government said it's not needed insurance companies won't pay for it.

Jul 19th
Reply

Philly Burbs

Get your booster now. today! it won't hurt. People are getting sick. look at the Olympics. Texas congress.

Jul 19th
Reply

Aryan Akhavan

Thanks Micahle your podcast is awsome.

Jul 18th
Reply

ekeama goddard

Thank you for doing this story. It's one of the most sensitively done pieces I have heard on on an issue that is difficult to listen to and know happened.

Jul 16th
Reply

JL Vega

The first cause of Cuban economic crisis is the corrupt and inept government. The second: the inept and corrupt government. The embargo, covid and rest of causes are way below in importance than the inept and corrupt government.

Jul 16th
Reply

Mahmoud Zamani

On of the worst episodes of the daily

Jul 16th
Reply

Jack Boller

Brain washed CRT agitprop. Mindless and lazy.

Jul 16th
Reply

Jack Boller

Communism. Say it. COMMUNISM

Jul 16th
Reply

Terry Miller

lol @ nyt blaming a communist country's downfall on capitalism is classic cope. if communism can only be successful without the sacrifice/support of capitalist countries, that should be yet another sign that it's not a very tenable economic/societal system.

Jul 15th
Reply

Tony Zac

so we saying that the sun is racist now? @ 5:13

Jul 14th
Reply

William

Trump's signatures are literally on the cheques used to pay back Cohen. Cohen went to prison and Trump was identified as a co-conspirator. It makes no sense that they drop such a clear case.

Jul 13th
Reply

The Rabbit Hole

if this is a tax evasion issue y'all are gonna make me like the guy.

Jul 13th
Reply

Hannah Morgan

An inspiring story

Jul 12th
Reply

Haley B

This episode is really twisting the demographics of Loundon county to make it seem as if there has been a sudden shift in the area. It's a liberal county with high income educated people. It's been blue for 20 years and these aren't a bunch of yolkels.

Jul 11th
Reply

MrCalPoly

the USA was involved in the Vietnam war for 19yrs before throwing in the towel. looks like same thing in Afghanistan, 20yrs and USA is out.

Jul 11th
Reply

Jack Boller

Conservatives are fine with discussing racism and racen teaching history is fine also. Fabricating + teaching a destructive and divisive ideology completely based on disparity of outcomes (equity) vs. Equality of opportunity is designed to destroy society. We don't indoctrinate our children into KKK ideology, nor do we indoctrinate our kids into Nazi ideology, so neither should we infect our children with CRT hateful, racist ideology.

Jul 9th
Reply

Clinton from Roraima.

I just need to say thanks!

Jul 9th
Reply

Aryan Akhavan

pleas be patiennce .beacause the patience is the key of triumph

Jul 6th
Reply

Nicolas Brylle

Why did did we go into lockdowns? To avert enormous pressure on the hospitals and deaths. Because covid is very transmissible and bit more deadly than flu. So by the time we vaccinated the older age and risk (obese) groups, this pressure has almost disappeared. So we do we still have to frighten people? Yes vigilance is necessary and we have to vaccinate as many as possible all over the world. But in countries were most are vaccinated, this madness has to end. We do not stop society for the flu. We just have to learn to live with it and get on with our lives. Stop the insanity.

Jul 6th
Reply

CA§H

While Delta variant is rapidly dominating Iran, only 2% of our population is vaccinated. When this insanity is going to end?

Jul 6th
Reply (2)
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