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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Listen to this podcast in New York Times Audio, our new iOS app for news subscribers. Download now at nytimes.com/audioapp
2171 Episodes
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A jury on Tuesday found Hunter Biden, President Biden’s son, guilty of three felonies related to the purchase of a gun at one of the low points of his troubled life.Katie Rogers, a White House correspondent for The Times, explains what the verdict could mean for the 2024 presidential race.Guest: Katie Rogers, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Mr. Biden was found guilty on charges related to a gun purchase in 2018.Here are some takeaways from the conviction.The president has grown more resigned and afraid about his son’s future, according to people close to the Bidens.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
Last week, President Biden announced one of the most restrictive immigration policies by a Democratic incumbent in decades, effectively barring migrants crossing the southern border from seeking asylum in the United States.Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a White House correspondent for The Times, explains the thinking behind the move.Guest: Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Biden’s executive order is an eye-catching election-year move intended to ease pressure on the immigration system and address a major concern among voters.Watch a short video detailing the key facts behind the immigration order.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
On Wednesday, Gov. Kathy Hochul of New York announced that she was indefinitely halting a project that had been decades in the making: congestion pricing in Manhattan’s core business district.Ana Ley, who covers mass transit in New York City, and Grace Ashford, who covers politics in New York, discuss why New York hit the brakes on congestion pricing.Guest: Ana Ley, who covers mass transit in New York City for The New York Times.Grace Ashford, a reporter covering New York government and politics for The New York Times.Background reading: How Ms. Hochul decided to kill congestion pricing in New York.Is New York’s Economy too fragile for congestion pricing? Many say no.How would congestion pricing have worked in New York City?For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
In a broken world, what can we gain by looking another animal in the eye? "Animal" is a six-part, round-the-world journey in search of an answer. In Episode 2, the writer Sam Anderson travels to Iceland to rescue baby puffins — which are called, adorably, pufflings.For more on "Animal," visit nytimes.com/animal. 
The actress is taking on serious roles, trying to overcome self-doubt and sharing more about her personal life — but she’s not done being funny.
Warning: this episode contains strong language, descriptions of explicit content and sexual harassmentA disturbing new problem is sweeping American schools: Students are using artificial intelligence to create sexually explicit images of their classmates and then share them without the person depicted even knowing.Natasha Singer, who covers technology, business and society for The Times, discusses the rise of deepfake nudes and one girl's fight to stop them.Guest: Natasha Singer, a reporter covering technology, business and society for The New York Times.Background reading: Using artificial intelligence, middle and high school students have fabricated explicit images of female classmates and shared the doctored pictures.Spurred by teenage girls, states have moved to ban deepfake nudes.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
At the height of the Covid pandemic, nearly 200 countries started negotiating a plan to ensure they would do better when the next pandemic inevitably arrived. Their deadline for that plan was last week.Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The Times, explains why, so far, the negotiations have failed.Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Countries failed to agree on a treaty to prepare the world for the next pandemic before a major international meeting.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
In an unexpected speech last week, President Biden revealed the details of a secret proposal intended to end the war in Gaza. Perhaps the most surprising thing was where that proposal had come from.Isabel Kershner, a reporter for The Times in Jerusalem, explains Mr. Biden’s gambit and the difficult choice it presents for Israel’s leader, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.Guest: Isabel Kershner, who covers Israeli and Palestinian affairs for The New York Times.Background reading: Mr. Biden called for an end to the war in Gaza, endorsing an Israeli cease-fire proposal.Mr. Netanyahu answered the call for a truce by insisting on the “destruction” of Hamas.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
Five years ago, a TV personality and comedian, Volodymyr Zelensky, won the presidency in Ukraine in a landslide victory. When Russia launched a full-scale invasion of the country three years later, he faced the biggest challenge of his presidency and of his life. Despite initial success beating back one of the world’s largest armies, the tide has turned against him.Andrew E. Kramer, the Kyiv bureau chief for The Times, sat down with Mr. Zelensky to discuss the war, and how it might end.Guest: Andrew E. Kramer, the Kyiv bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Read The New York Times’s interview with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine.Explaining the debate over Ukraine’s use of Western weapons.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
Last week, Donald J. Trump became the first U.S. former president to be convicted of a crime when a jury found that he had falsified business records to conceal a sex scandal.Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The Times, and Reid J. Epstein, who also covers politics, discuss how the conviction might shape the remaining months of the presidential race.Guest: Nate Cohn, who is the chief political analyst for The New York Times.Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The New York Times.Reid J. Epstein, who covers politics for The New York Times.Background reading: The political fallout is far from certain, but the verdict will test America’s traditions and legal institutions.Watch a video analysis of whether this newfound moment sticks politically.Democrats are pushing President Biden to make Mr. Trump’s felonies a top 2024 issue.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
In a broken world, what can we gain by looking another animal in the eye? "Animal" is a six-part, round-the-world journey in search of an answer. Join the writer Sam Anderson on Episode 1.For more on "Animal," visit nytimes.com/animal.
David Marchese talks to the acclaimed director about his new film “Hit Man” and life’s big questions.
Guilty

Guilty

2024-05-3132:4220

Former President Donald J. Trump has become the first American president to be declared a felon. A Manhattan jury found that he had falsified business records to conceal a sex scandal that could have hindered his 2016 campaign for the White House.Jonah Bromwich, who has been covering the hush-money trial for The Times, was in the room.Guest: Jonah E. Bromwich, covers criminal justice in New York for The New York Times.Background reading: Here’s the verdict, count by count.This is what happens next.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
Over recent years, few companies have provoked more anger among music fans than Ticketmaster. Last week, the Department of Justice announced it was taking the business to court.David McCabe, who covers technology policy for The Times, explains how the case could reshape America’s multibillion-dollar live music industry.Guest: David McCabe, a technology policy correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The government is accusing Ticketmaster’s corporate parent, Live Nation Entertainment, of violating antitrust laws.Here’s a guide to the emails at the heart of the government’s case.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
On Tuesday, lawyers for the prosecution and the defense delivered their final arguments to the jury in the criminal case of The People of the State of New York v. Donald J. Trump.Jonah Bromwich, one of the lead reporters covering the trial for The Times, was there.Guest: Jonah E. Bromwich, who covers criminal justice in New York for The New York Times.Background reading: A fine blade and a sledgehammer: Read more about the style and content of the closing arguments.Watch Jonah Bromwich recap the day outside the courthouse.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
The discovery that an upside-down American flag — a symbol adopted by the campaign to overturn the 2020 election result — had flown at the home of Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. elicited concerns from politicians, legal scholars and others. And then came news of a second flag.Jodi Kantor, the Times reporter who broke the stories, discusses the saga.Guest: Jodi Kantor, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: An upside-down American flag, a symbol adopted by Trump supporters contesting the Biden victory, flew over the justice’s front lawn as the Supreme Court was considering an election case.The justice’s beach house displayed an “Appeal to Heaven” flag, a design carried on Jan. 6 and associated with a push for a more Christian-minded government.The displays renew questions about the Supreme Court’s impartiality.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
Netflix won the streaming battle, but the war for your attention isn’t over.
Whales Have an Alphabet

Whales Have an Alphabet

2024-05-2427:1814

Ever since the discovery of whale songs almost 60 years ago, scientists have been trying to decipher the lyrics.But sperm whales don’t produce the eerie melodies sung by humpback whales, sounds that became a sensation in the 1960s. Instead, sperm whales rattle off clicks that sound like a cross between Morse code and a creaking door.Carl Zimmer, a science reporter, explains the possibility why it’s possible that the whales are communicating in a complex language.Guest: Carl Zimmer, a science reporter for The New York Times who also writes the Origins column.Background readingScientists find an “alphabet” in whale songs.These whales still use their vocal cords. But how?For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
This week, Karim Khan, the top prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, requested arrest warrants for Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, and the country’s defense minister, Yoav Gallant.Patrick Kingsley, the Times’s bureau chief in Jerusalem, explains why this may set up a possible showdown between the court and Israel with its biggest ally, the United States.Guest: Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Why did a prosecutor go public with the arrest warrant requests?The warrant request appeared to shore up domestic support for Mr. Netanyahu.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
The Biden administration is trying to crack down on sneaky fees charged by hotels, rental cars, internet providers and more.Jim Tankersley, a White House correspondent, explains why the effort is doubling as a war against something else that Biden is finding much harder to defeat.Guest: Jim Tankersley, who covers economic policy at the White House for The New York Times.Background reading: This month, a judge temporarily blocked a new rule limiting credit-card late fees.Hotels and airlines struggling to recoup their losses from the pandemic have been including more hidden charges. Don’t fall for them.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
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Comments (6261)

Tasman Systems

Really interesting in London the zone argument is about an inevitable environmental change. Some more advanced countries are designing carless cities. I was shocked on my last 2 visits to the states to see the extent of air con and massive single driver vehicles. If you must focus on financial arguments is anyone calculating the revenue from more passengers taking the metro as a consequence of the zone?

Jun 12th
Reply

Charles Mchale

WTF...you never mention that Trump killed the immigration bill. You're treating trump like hes just another politician.Have you lost your minds? Good Bye NYT.

Jun 11th
Reply

Alex Ander

Sentimientos encontrados.

Jun 10th
Reply

Farshad Shahkarami

This is too cute! 🥹

Jun 9th
Reply

Eric Everitt

pathetic and depressing.. unsubscribe

Jun 9th
Reply (3)

mohamad birya

it seems that you are just zionists. i mean the daily from the first day of this "war" is obviously a zionist propaganda machine.

Jun 7th
Reply

Troy Kathlee Fitzgerald

it's about all the things mentioned in this Pod cast AND it's about the overall rape culture that is pervasive in this country and the devaluation of women and their basic right to privacy

Jun 7th
Reply

失魂魚🐟

Another incredibly well done "The Interview".... almost every question was the one I wanted to ask desperately. Thank you, The Daily. "Don't ask when the war will end, ask why Putin is still in Ukraine” -President Zelensky.

Jun 6th
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J G

Typical.

Jun 6th
Reply

Joshua Canepa Gallo

Good morning Daily Team! Thanks for your outstanding work. In the "Here's what else you need...to know today" you may have forgotten to mention that Claudia Sheinbaum just became the first woman president of MÉX :)

Jun 3rd
Reply

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Jun 1st
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Paz Ibarra-Muñoz

Typical Florida man

May 31st
Reply

Chemical Bull

Your knowledge is invaluable. Thanks for the info! https://www.chemicalbull.com/products/globalide

May 30th
Reply

The Listening Wind

This is an opportunity for all of us to be good people. To make small comforts for others. To be kind and compassionate. Because it matters how we go extinct. Let’s at least do that well.

May 29th
Reply

adam meredith

Maybe the ICC should have issued an arrest warrant for George Buah for attacking Iraq, under false pretenses.

May 24th
Reply

23401360

I grew up on this record.

May 24th
Reply (4)

Nina

I try to channel my anxiety about the climate into action, be it community actions such as community solar, personal actions such as getting off the grid as much as possible, or contacting elected and government officials about policy. These actions give me joy, especially when done with friends. It keeps me from falling into despair.

May 22nd
Reply

yung.Yerp.

congress: ' we don't want Americans to put their money in *speculative* assets like cryptocurrency ' also congress: trades BA , BOA, and every other stock with privileged information shared in committee hearings dumping on public directly

May 21st
Reply

AH

Can you provide your data on this poll? How was it conducted (phone, email, social media), number of people polled & number of responses. Was it regional or did it cover the entire US? Thanks.

May 19th
Reply

True

45:00

May 17th
Reply