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This week’s guest will “shock you into noticing the world differently.” The glorious Bayo Akomolafe is a Nigerian-born Yoruba poet, author and teacher at universities and institutions across the UK, the US, Canada and India. He has also won the 2021 New Thought Walden Award which honours empowering spiritual ideas and philosophies that change lives and make our planet a better place. Bayo uses “trickster philosophy” and intense metaphors to present truly wild – but intuitively sound - ways to cope with the complex, existential challenges that we face. This is a madly challenging conversation and we touch on relaxing into our entanglement with the world, and how to be a fugitive. Bayo invites us to abandon "solutionism" and to ask different questions: What is climate collapse asking of us? What if the way we’re responding to the crisis is part of the crisis? What if the “answer” is to join the chaos and give in to nature? Bayo is a sage for our times and I truly encourage everyone to experience his wild mind and words…and to learn how to become a fugitive!You can connect with Bayo via his website and Twitter Here is the poem I ask Bayo to read out And here is the essay What Climate Collapse Asks of Us He references Ursula K Le Guin’s book The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" pageSubscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversations Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
This episode continues the fascinating-slash-frightening journey I’ve been on with you, to understand what we should prioritise as we face potential existential end times. Today’s guest, Harvard researcher and philanthropist Holden Karnofsky, brings the AI, effective altruism, longtermism and anti-growth debates together with the clarion call: “This is our moment, this century is make-or-break, pay attention people!” It’s not an idle or hysterical call, it’s one that Holden has researched extensively and is backed by global leaders in the space. As some background: Holden founded Givewell, the charity evaluator that has raised more than $US1billion for charities that have saved more than 150,000 lives (Bill Gates, Sam Harris and the now disgraced billionaire Sam Bankman-Fried use it) and Open Philanthropy investigates more speculative causes. So if this is the most important century, what does it mean for us? What are our responsibilities? What’s going to happen? Buckle up, says Holden, because, “we live in wild times and should be ready for anything to happen”. Here’s the "most important century" blog post series we talk about.I also flag Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro. As well as this Vice article about how scientists can’t explain how AI works.You might also want to go back and listen to the episodes with Peter Singer on effective altruism, Will Macaskill on Longtermism and Elise Bohan on misaligned AI and transhumanism......If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversation. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The fashion industry produces 20% of global wastewater and more carbon emissions than ALL international flights and ALL maritime shipping COMBINED. If nothing changes, by 2050 the fashion industry will use up a quarter of the world’s carbon budget. Ex-Vogue journalist and founder of The Wardrobe Crisis (the book, podcast and academy) Clare Press joins me to wrestle the quandaries: Is vegan leather ethical? Are recycled plastic leggings green? What labels are legit carbon neutral? Does the stuff I donate to St Vinnies just go to landfill? (Yup.) Is it true when I return something online it goes to landfill and not back on rack? (Double yup!). I wanted to do this episode to set the truly shocking facts straight and share the tangible better options, but also to posit the wild idea of redefining fashion style in a new, far more creative way. Dig in!Check out The Wardrobe Crisis, the book, podcast and academy of courses Follow Clare on instagram We discuss an Atlantic article about returning online purchases, you can read it here. Clare’s Recommendations:The scorecard/resources for finding “good” brands: The Or Foundation, Oxfam’s Naughty or Nice, Fashion Revolution and Baptist World Aid Guide. The book to read: Loved clothes last by Orsola De CastroThe recycling app: UpparelThe influencer to follow: Maggis ZhuThe documentary to watch: 'Slay' The label: The Social Outfit in Newtown based in Sydney, or check out the sister organisations in Melbourne and London. I mentioned that Kay Montano in London had recommended a 1951 film The Man in the White Suit .....If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversation. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
There’s a young Australian human rights lawyer and barrister who has been at the centre of the most era-defining legal cases in the world. She has represented Julian Assange since 2010. She led the Amber Heard case. She worked on the case against the CIA’s drone strikes in Pakistan and a case against the Catholic Church over child sex abuse. She was also a legal adviser to The New York Times in the Murdoch phone-hacking scandal and regularly fronts up to the International Court of Justice and various UN human rights bodies representing the poor, oppressed, the maligned. Her name’s Jen Robinson, and she grew up in a low-income family in the small rural town of Berry, proudly schooled in public education and went on to be a Rhodes scholar and to work alongside Geoffrey Robertson and George Clooney’s wife Amal. Jen and I get mighty fired up about …speaking up...speaking up as an act of vitality and antidote to depression. We also cover why we want our friends to send their kids to public schools, the inside take on the Assange case, what we need to know about the Amber Heard case (big slap in face for me) and her new book, How Many More Woman, which shares how women can beat the legal system at its own game (and speak up!).You can now purchase Jen’s book, How Many More Women hereFollow Jen on Twitter .....If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversation. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
We crave adventure to break up the ho-hum of our everyday lives. But busting ruts doesn’t have to be all about conquering Everest or ticking off bucket list challenges. We can get the same result as a “backyard adventurer”.Beau Miles, a Patagonia and Outward Bound ambassador, author and YouTube star, used to be a mad explorer – he’s indeed conquered Everest base camp, became the first person to run 650kms across the Australian Alps, kayaked Bass Strait and the rest. But a few years back he made the switch to exploring the world closer to home and now inspires a league of fans who froth over his mad-as videos of running the length of the old Warragul-Noojee Railway line to learn its history (dressed in a train driver uniform, carrying a shovel and three jars of dried pasta, just to chuck a hardship bomb into the equation), eating his body weight in beans (to see what happens), and spending a night in the tree outside his front door. This is a more of a fun two-way chat where the two of us compare notes on flipping your day-to-day life into a flirtation, getting out of life ruts, playing and loving being weird.Grab Beau’s book The Backyard Adventurer: Meaningful and pointless expeditions, self-experiments and the value of other people's junk Stay up to date with all his adventures via Instagram You can watch Beau’s films here .....If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversation. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Life is hard. And yet so much of contemporary life compels us to fight this fundamental reality. We are meant to be happy! We are meant to live our best, most #blissful, potential-stacked life! But I talk with Kieran Setiya, a professor of philosophy at MIT, who argues we should #NotLiveOurBestLife. It’s better to aspire to a life that is, well, good enough. Kieran has appeared on Sam Harris’ podcast, written for the New York Times, the London Review of Books etc bringing a philosophical argument to pop issues such as the Dave Chapelle quandary, baseball and the worth of having a midlife crises.  In his latest book, Life is Hard, he draws on Aristotle, Wittgenstein, and Simone Weil - as well as Groundhog Day and Joan Didion – to guide us to a good life, which entails embracing pain and hardship. In this chat we cover: How to make friends; what if the whole world turned sterile; the beauty of chronic pain and Kieran’s thesis for “the meaning of life” (it’s a cracker, and it’s not 42!).Grab Kieran’s book Life Is Hard: How Philosophy Can Help Us Find Our WayRead some of his essays and connect with him via his websiteHe mentions he came across Wild via this interview with Katherine May .....If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversation. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
He is regarded as the greatest science fiction writer alive and his most recent book, set in the climate catastrophe-wracked near future, The Ministry for the Future, is recommended widely by Barack Obama and Ezra Klein and such is the accuracy of his futuristic depictions Kim Stanley Robinson is now called upon to consult on climate solutions by the Pentagon and at COP26. But Kim is also a mad hiker and his latest book The High Sierra: A Love Story is a hiking guidebook-slash-meditation-slash-dedication to what he calls psychogeology (the way places shape the ways we think). I’ve been busting to have this chat. The Ministry for the Future blew my mind when I read it at the end of 2020, and we cover a bunch of expansive and wild ideas: how moving your desk outdoors can restart your career, geoengineering, donut economics and what your hiking gear says about your lack of critical thought (Kim is an ultra-lighter; wait until you hear how much is backpack weighs for a week’s trek!). Kim is 70 now and in many ways I find this chat to be inspirational fodder for mapping a life well-lived.Grab a copy of The Ministry for the Future Kim’s latest book is The High Sierra: A Love StoryWe also mention: Nan Shepard: The Living MountainThomas Piketty: Brief History of EqualityKate Raworth: Doughnut EconomicsAnd here’s a link to Network for Greening the Financial Systems.....If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversations. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Do you listen to Jordan Peterson, Sam Harris, Joe Rogan, Russell Brand or maybe a bit of Lex Freidman? They are the biggest names in podcasting (and beyond) and they started out as progressive voices, robustly questioning the status quo and challenging dominant interests and often bringing alternative spiritual or psychological perspectives to the big debates. But a trend has emerged among this crew of “bro-casters”. My guest in this episode, Australian psychology academic Matt Browne, argues that as their fame rises, many slide into taking on “guru” status. Matt is cohost of DECODING THE GURUS, a somewhat controversial podcast that does as it says on the packet, and I get him on to dissect this pop cultural phenomenon for us. We talk: the intellectual dark web (IDW); “galaxy brain”; what’s the deal with their all-meat diets and love of MMA; why young men flock to these gurus; and what it all says about the world, specifically our need for good, humble leadership. It’s a bit of a “meta” chat this one, but wild and intriguing too. I challenge everyone to determine their own take as they listen to Matt and I dissect the topic (he and I don’t agree on it all, BTW).Listen to Decoding the Gurus hereFollow Matt on twitterMatt mentions two non “pseude psychological bullshit” podcasts to look out for: Very Bad Wizards and Two Psychologists Four Beers......If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversation. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
There is a massive “authority gap” that exists in the world today, where women are taken way less seriously than men and still treated as less competent. They are interrupted four times as often as men and are overlooked for not being as confident as a bloke (while studies show that men’s perceived additional confidence is mostly “bullshitting”). And, yet, as my guest London-based journalist and broadcaster Mary Ann Sieghart explains, there are only wins to be had by closing this authority gap.Mary Ann both coined the term and wrote the book by the same name and she shares with me that when gender parity is achieved men experience less divorce, less suicide, less addiction, their chances of dying a violent death are almost halved and their happiness increases; while nations with female leaders have less corruption, better health outcomes and experience a spike in GDP. I find this chat wild in its dispelling of the misconception that making the world more balanced is a zero-sum game (that as women achieve gains, men lose out). Quite the opposite! Our chat comes on the 10-year anniversary of former Australian PM Julia Gillard’s misogyny speech…Mary Ann leaves us with a super interesting insight on this, too.Grab Mary Ann’s book, The Authority GapFollow her on Instagram and TwitterHere’s the data on the gender gap in Australia that I refer to. And here’s Julia Gillard’s misogyny speech in full. .....If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversation. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
What if we could bioengineer our bodies to live forever, would we and should we? What if we could avoid all the awkward bits of sex and just neatly copulate with a robot? And what if we never had to go through the bother and pain of pregnancy and could instead use artificial external wombs? Would we? And should we? Transhumanists say these are moot questions because the superhuman or post-human train has well and truly left the station. We’re only decades from these altered, souped up realities. Oxford transhumanist scholar Elise Bohan and I roll our sleeves up to discuss the litany of moral questions that arise from this, like why the hell were we not consulted on this before the train took off? Has anyone stopped to ask if this is what humanity wants or can handle morally? We chat about the singularity, the particularly worrying effects on men and dating and Elise posits a timeframe for AI intelligence taking over from human smarts (!). If ever there was a conversation in history to get us talking about what matters and makes for a flourishing existence, this is it. Take a deep breath…Grab Elise’s book, Future Superhuman: Our Transhuman Lives in a Make-or-Break Century I refer to the book Klara and the Sun by Kazuo IshiguroAnd we reference previous podcast chats with William Macaskill.....If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversation. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
You know the latest IPCC* Assessment Report? The one that came out at the end of 2021 that the UN secretary general dubbed “Code Red for humanity”? Australian climate scientist Joëlle Gergis was one of its lead authors responsible for its 3 million words of truly stark wake-up-call content.This episode I catch up with her at the Byron Writer’s Festival (where she was launching her new book on climate grief) and volley her with questions compiled by my Substack membership community.What does the report predict for Australia in 20 years? What can I tell my Dad when he says “we’ve always had climate warming cycles”? Is carbon capture and storage a furphy? Joelle rallies off the facts, but also shares a beautiful wisdom on climate grief, or “solastalgia” as it’s often called. * International Panel on Climate ChangeGrab Joëlle's book now Humanity's Moment: A climate scientist's case for hope....If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversation. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Right, we’re doing something different this episode. Uber-talented radio/TV/podcast host and contrarian Josh Szeps has me on his Uncomfortable Conversations podcast to chat sugar, cannonau wine, class wars, woke-speak, ethics, the decline of innovation in wealthy countries, how men around the world behave on dating apps and the perils of looking like could be on an insurance ad. For some context: Josh is currently the host of afternoons on ABC Radio Sydney and you might also have heard him hosting a bunch of other TV, radio and podcast shows here and in the US where he was a regular on NBC’s Today Show, or the time – earlier this year – when he ‘annihilated’ Joe Rogan during a rambling frustrating chat about vaccines. Check out Josh’s podcast Uncomfortable ConversationsFollow Josh on Twitter and InstagramThat Harvard study I mention? Check it out hereI also mention my podcast ep with Lech Blaine. You can listen here As well as the Will Macaskill chat on Longtermism…listen here ....If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversation. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
If only we all learned to think more we might solve the problems of the world. This is a thesis British philosopher A.C. Grayling has devoted much of his life to via his 40-odd books, the philosophy college he founded in London and his engagement in global debates on euthanasia, the existence God, Brexit and beyond. In his latest book, For the Good of the World, he applies it to the challenge of achieving global agreement to solve the various global catastrophes we have created. In this fun chat we talk “Graylings Law”, the “hard problem” of consciousness and why tech bros and young men love stoicism; I present him with the ethical quandary of putting lentils in SUV tyre valves as an act of global good; and he shows us how to develop our own life philosophy…by loving, engaging in and wrestling with thinking. He also leaves us with some wild quotes and reads and wisdoms with which to start the process.Purchase your copy of For the Good of the World: Is a Universal Ethics PossibleIf you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversation. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
This episode is an intense one. It’s with multi-Walkley Award-winning Australian photographer Andrew Quilty who has spent the past eight years living and working in the Afghanistan capital Kabul, documenting the conflict for publications around the world. We talk about the details of the decades-long occupation and go into the story of that day - one year ago - when the Taliban arrived at the gates of Kabul as the allied forces and tens of thousands of Afghans tried to flee in scenes of chaos and tragedy (which he shares in his new book August in Kabul). But, really, this conversation is more about meaning. And what makes life worthwhile when the standard accoutrements are stripped away by destruction and human ugliness? I recommend looking up Andrew's photographs as you listen to him in this episode share his very raw account of life in a war zone, his take on the morality of capturing and sharing images of humans in their worst moments, as well as his very intimate reflections on finding meaning in “homecoming”.Andrew’s book, August in Kabul is out this weekScroll his photographs as you listenWe mention Sebastian Junger’s Tribe… you can grab it here ....If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversations. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious Life Let’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
In exclusive pockets around the world rich, white (mostly) men are prepping for end times. They are hoarding resources and building bunkers, putting billions into funding their place on Mars. They could be funding renewable energy projects, or putting their efforts into restoring political stability, you know, finding ways for humanity to survive on our beloved Earth. But no. Irish author and journalist Mark O’Connell conducted something of a perverse pilgrimage of these pockets for his book Notes from an Apocalypse and in this episode I talk with him about how we should feel about such a dividing phenomenon. And, importantly, what we can learn from it…before it becomes our future. Follow Mark on TwitterGrab Mark’s book, Notes from an Apocalypse: A Personal Journey to the End of the World and BackIf you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversations. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious LifeLet’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Our existential risk – the probability that we could wipe ourselves out due to AI, bio-engineering, nuclear war, climate change, etc. in the next 100 years – currently sits at 1 in 6. Let that sink in!  Would you get on a plane if there was a 17% chance it would crash? Would you do everything you could to prevent a calamity if you were presented with those odds? My chat today covers a wild idea that could – and should -  better our chances of existing as a species…and lead to a human flourishing I struggle to even imagine. Long Termism argues that prioritisng the long term future of humanity has exponential ethical and existential boons. Flipside, if we don’t choose the long termist route, the repercussions are, well, devastating.Will MacAskill is one of the world’s leading moral philosophers and I travel to Oxford UK, where he runs the Global Centre of Effective Altruism, the Global Priorities Institute and the Forethought Foundation, to talk through these massive moral issues. Will also explains that right now is the most important time in humanity’s history. Our generation singularly has the power and responsibility to determine two diametrically different paths for humanity. This excites me; I hope it does you, too.Learn more about Will MacAskill’s work Purchase his new book What We Owe the Future: A million year view If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversations. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious LifeLet’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The wealthy elite once signalled their status with expensive handbags and super yachts. Now they do it with what Rob Henderson calls “luxury beliefs” - so-called politically correct pronouncements that, in reality, only the rich can afford to live by and thusly differentiate them from the rest of us. We’re talking about such wokenesses as “defund the police” and calls for drug legalisation, death to marriage and putting “polyamorous” on your dating profile. Of course, defunding the police is all very well if you can afford to live in a gated community with low crime and security guards. It should be said, Rob, now a moral philosopher at the University of Cambridge, comes at this wild idea from a very unique perspective. He grew up poor, a foster kid who was doing drugs at the age of 9 and who had to learn to decode elite signalling as an outsider once he hit the liberal US university scene. This is a super juicy and confronting thesis, evidence of which I can’t stop noticing everywhere and I loved the way Rob applies the wild idea to online dating, cancel culture and conservative politics.Follow Rob on TwitterCheck out Rob's WebsiteAnd you can read the New York Times op-ed we talk about. His book Troubled: A Memoir of Foster Care, Family, and Social Class will be published in the European fall of 2023.We chat about Joseph Henrich’s WEIRD theory and class myths in Australia from my Lech Blaine chat, both ran a few episodes back. If you need to know a bit more about me… head to my "about" page. Subscribe to my Substack newsletter for more such conversations. Get your copy of my book, This One Wild and Precious LifeLet’s connect on Instagram! It’s where I interact the most. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Breaking things up a bit this episode with an AMA from London where I'm staying with my good friend Melissa Hemsley, cookbook author, sustainable food advocate and humanitarian. Mel kindly reads out a bunch of juicy questions: Do you have botox? How do we stay hopeful in the climate crisis when giving up and just enjoying the few remaining "normal years" is easier? Should 16 year-olds be allowed to vote? What about trying mushrooms for anxiety? How do you make friends as an adult? Much of the chat comes back to pulsing between the either/ors we are confronted with, finding the "sweet spot" and making the struggle artful. You can follow Melissa @melissa.hemsley and melissahemsley.com...she runs cooking courses and tutorials.Some of the other names we mentioned:@susanjanekitchen@thehappypear@clerkenwellboyec1I mentioned the link to the beauty products I use https://www.nourishedlife.com.au/search.html?tag=sarah-wilson Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Wintering is the process of resting and withdrawing in dark, or fallow, periods, respecting the rhythm of the cycles of nature and the role of winter. A lost art in a summer-based culture. British author Katherine May writes: “There are gaps in the mesh of the everyday world, and sometimes they open up and you fall through them to somewhere else..into a sad and lonely and isolated place." These gaps may open from the loss of a loved one, difficult childbirth, illness, the loss of a job, failure in love and so on.In this chat, Katherine and I go deep and gentle, on creating space (as opposed to time) to reflect, “enjoying” sadness and how to carve out a meaningful life when you have a chronic illness (and autism). Katherine’s wild idea is that returning to a cyclical - rather than forever-reaching linear – view of the human experience is how we can bring about the healing and guidance we need in such dark and sad times. Learn more about Katherine here Buy her book WinteringKatherine's next book, Enchantment, will be published in 2023.Find out more about Sarah Wilson Subscribe to Sarah's Substack newsletter Get your copy of Sarah's book, This One Wild and Precious LifeConnect on Instagram Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
We can’t make sense of the world anymore, right? How can we when our leaders lie, the media publishes non-truths, conspiracies spread faster than facts and the algorithms favour bullshit? Recently, I’ve started following a “Sensemaking movement” of philosophers, renegades, sociologists and psychologists who are trying to return the world to truthfulness. And it excites me no end! Sensemaking is a very fun and dynamic set of theories and techniques for sorting truth from lies and also for ensuring we live truthfully ourselves. While I was in London, I sat down with BBC filmmaker David Fuller who founded Rebel Wisdom – THE international hub for this movement - to do something a little different. I got him to run us through a 101 on how to sense-make. We cover lies v bullshitting (and how bullshitting is more dangerous) the Boris/Scott/Donald travesty (all bullshitters), sovereignty and arguing with climate sceptics. Along the way he gives a brilliant overview of what really is the most exciting and wild “wisdom” movement to emerge in decades. I feel this is a really important episode for where I’ll be taking this Wild ride in the coming months.Join the Rebel Wisdom community and look out for their upcoming Sensemaking 101 courseFind out more about Sarah Wilson Subscribe to Sarah's Substack newsletter Get your copy of Sarah's book, This One Wild and Precious LifeConnect on Instagram Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Comments (5)

Jacqui du-Buisson

loved this episode. sometimes I cringe recalling my thoughts on some cultural practices different to my own. privilege and how we are shaped by our environment can be extremely limiting or an opportunity for growth depending on your mindset. I love the take away of staying humble and practising humility are key.

Jul 29th
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Jacqui du-Buisson

well done on an educational and realistic run up to the elections. I have no doubt that your podcasts and tireless commitment to fair and democratic process has helped in achieving a change in government that has some serious accountability to keep them on a better path for this world and future generations.

Jun 1st
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Jacqui du-Buisson

loving the last few episodes. election conviction is foremost on my mind right now.

Apr 25th
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Amy

I learnt so much in this conversation! thank you so much! definitely worth a few listens.

Apr 18th
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Jacqui du-Buisson

I loved your chat with Sia! Agreed, she is truly an artist of the ages and seems limitless in what she can create. My take from today's chat is that we all need to look at the intent behind words and actions before we judge. Sia's intention was clearly sympathetic. We are all learning and most likely to absorb and change belief systems if we are gently educated about prejudices that we are unaware we had/have. my daughter is continually bringing things to my attention that I need to look at through a different lens. I'm really looking forward to seeing the movie 😁 Jacqui 🦋

Mar 18th
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