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Water We Doing?

Author: David Evans

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Discover how our most precious commodity impacts our lives in so many fascinating ways. That's right! We're talking about water, but not like you've ever heard it before. Join us as we explore social, environmental and economic issues around the globe as we ask the questions: what are we doing, and how can we do better? The "Water We Doing?" podcast is a production of the Aquatic Biosphere Project. The podcast is produced and hosted by David Evans (P. Biol), the Project's Director of Conservation. For more info please check out www.AquaticBiosphere.ca
23 Episodes
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Locusts. For those born in the 1990s, one of the first images that come to memory is the evil Hopper, a scarred grasshopper, ruthless and violent, and arch-nemesis of the curious and inventing ant Flik in Bug’s life. In the Disney Pixar cartoon, Hopper and his gang devastate crops, destroying any food source available and terrorizing other creatures living in their same area. A plague that for countries like Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Eritrea has become a living nightmare. 2020, the year of the pandemic, but also the year of one of the worst devastations caused by desert locust. Locust swarm clouds can quickly descend and cover a surface area three times the size of New York City. Feasting on anything green, within a few hours, any vegetation that crosses its path is gone. As reported by FAO (Food and Agriculture Organizations of the United Nations), this Biblical plague has created a food crisis for more than 20 million people, at risk of serious starvation. In this episode, Dr. Keith Cressman, FAO locust forecasting expert discusses with us how this migratory pest has become a more frequent threat, the role that water plays in increasing or decreasing its likelihood, and how climate change is linked directly to this crisis.Want to learn more about Desert Locusts and the state of the their spread in the world? Check out Locust Watch where you can find updates and predictions on desert locusts movements across the world and is managed by Dr. Keith Cressman!For more information on Desert Locust and their biology, movement and how we can control them click here!
Locusts. For those born in the 1990s, one of the first images that come to memory is the evil Hopper, a scarred grasshopper, ruthless and violent, and arch-nemesis of the curious and inventing ant Flik in Bug’s life. In the Disney Pixar cartoon, Hopper and his gang devastate crops, destroying any food source available and terrorizing other creatures living in their same area. A plague that for countries like Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Eritrea has become a living nightmare. 2020, the year of the pandemic, but also the year of one of the worst devastations caused by desert locust. Locust swarm clouds can quickly descend and cover a surface area three times the size of New York City. Feasting on anything green, within a few hours, any vegetation that crosses its path is gone. As reported by FAO (Food and Agriculture Organizations of the United Nations), this Biblical plague has created a food crisis for more than 20 million people, at risk of serious starvation. In this episode, Dr. Keith Cressman, FAO locust forecasting expert discusses with us how this migratory pest has become a more frequent threat, the role that water plays in increasing or decreasing its likelihood, and how climate change is linked directly to this crisis. Want to learn more about Desert Locusts and the state of the their spread in the world? Check out Locust Watch where you can find updates and predictions on desert locusts movements across the world and is managed by Dr. Keith Cressman!For more information on Desert Locust and their biology, movement and how we can control them click here!The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
Did you know you eat about a credit card's worth of plastic every week?Plastic is in almost everything humans produce and consume these days. When plastic isn't reused, recycled, or properly disposed of it begins to break down in the environment. It breaks into tiny microscopic pieces called microplastics which can be found everywhere on the planet. They travel in rain drops, can be blown by the winds and are consumed by small organisms and biomagnify up the food chain. We are eating plastic and we don't even know it.Want to find ways to stop contributing micro plastics into our natural environments? Consider choosing products with biodegradable packaging like he companies below!MarinaTex repurposes unused fish from fish processing facilities to create a compostable plastic alternative!Genecis converts food waste into biodegradebale plastics.UHaul, ULine, Staples and many more companies have an option for compostable packing peanuts. Consider adding one of these filters to your washing machine!Filtrol uses a reusable microfibre net to filter out 89% of micro plastics and other biodegradable fibers from your washing machinePlanet Care has another reusable filter to catch micro plastic fibers coming from your home!Elanos has a filter that you throw in with your laundry and it filters as you wash!Want to find your way away from other plastic in your life?Check out companies like Little plastic Footprint who are making it easy for people to make the change!Click here to see Dr. David Locky's Website about his research oh and click here for his second website!Are you interested in his latest journal article that concerns microplastics detected in the waters around Edmonton Alberta? Click Here to read it!The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
Did you know you eat about a credit card's worth of plastic every week?Plastic is in almost everything humans produce and consume these days. When plastic isn't reused, recycled, or properly disposed of it begins to break down in the environment. It breaks into tiny microscopic pieces called microplastics which can be found everywhere on the planet. They travel in rain drops, can be blown by the winds and are consumed by small organisms and biomagnify up the food chain. We are eating plastic and we don't even know it.Want to find ways to stop contributing micro plastics into our natural environments? Consider choosing products with biodegradable packaging like he companies below!MarinaTex repurposes unused fish from fish processing facilities to create a compostable plastic alternative!Genecis converts food waste into biodegradebale plastics.UHaul, ULine, Staples and many more companies have an option for compostable packing peanuts. Consider adding one of these filters to your washing machine!Filtrol uses a reusable microfibre net to filter out 89% of micro plastics and other biodegradable fibers from your washing machinePlanet Care has another reusable filter to catch micro plastic fibers coming from your home!Elanos has a filter that you throw in with your laundry and it filters as you wash!Want to find your way away from other plastic in your life?Check out companies like Little plastic Footprint who are making it easy for people to make the change!Click here to see Dr. David Locky's Website about his research oh and click here for his second website! Are you interested in his latest journal article that concerns microplastics detected in the waters around Edmonton Alberta? Click Here to read it!The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
As the global population grows to 10 billion by 2050 we will need to find new ways to feed everyone. As our water resources and productive agricultural land get stretched thinner and thinner we will need to find new and innovative ways to produce food! In today's episode we are discussing two innovative approaches to producing food which are very water conscious and that could be providing our food sooner than you might think!Today we're discussing Seaweed Cultivation! The world bank thinks that Seaweed could make up 10% of the food for the world by that point! Think about it you just need an ocean and sunlight and there you go!You'll hear from Mike Williamson the CEO of  Cascadia Seaweed!  You'll hear all about the health benefits, ecosystems services and how seaweed can be integrated into the North American Diet!Check out Cascadia Seaweeds website here for more information about Seaweed farming and their new innovative products! Do you live near Sydney, British Columbia? You should mark your calendars for Seaweed Days from May 17-23rd, where Cascadia Seaweed will be launching their new products!The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
As the global population grows to 10 billion by 2050 we will need to find new ways to feed everyone. As our water resources and productive agricultural land get stretched thinner and thinner we will need to find new and innovative ways to produce food! In today's episode we are discussing two innovative approaches to producing food which are very water conscious and that could be providing our food sooner than you might think!Today we're discussing Aquaponics! Did you know that you can produce fresh vegetables and plant based proteins anywhere in the world using less water than it takes to shower with aquaponics?You'll hear from the team from Pontus Proteins, an aquaponics company out of Vancouver, BC. Connor, Alson and Steve are taking aquaponics to the next level by integrating robotic harvesting, artificial intelligence and vertical farming. Interested in learning more about Water Lentils and why you need them in your life?  Click here for more information about PONTUS proteins!The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
As the global population grows to 10 billion by 2050 we will need to find new ways to feed everyone. As our water resources and productive agricultural land get stretched thinner and thinner we will need to find new and innovative ways to produce food! In today's episode we are discussing two innovative approaches to producing food which are very water conscious and that could be providing our food sooner than you might think!Today we're discussing Aquaponics and Seaweed Cultivation! Did you know that you can produce fresh vegetables and plant based proteins anywhere in the world using less water than it takes to shower with aquaponics ?The world bank thinks that Seaweed could make up 10% of the food for the world by that point! Think about it you just need an ocean and sunlight and there you go!You'll hear from the team from Pontus Proteins, an aquaponics company out of Vancouver, BC. Connor, Alson and Steve are taking aquaponics to the next level by integrating robotic harvesting, artificial intelligence and vertical farming. You'll also hear from Mike Williamson the CEO of  Cascadia Seaweed!  You'll hear all about the health benefits, ecosystems services and how seaweed can be integrated into the North American Diet! Check out Cascadia Seaweeds website here for more information about Seaweed farming and their new innovative products! Do you live near Sydney, British Columbia? You should mark your calendars for Seaweed Days from May 17-23rd, where Cascadia Seaweed will be launching their new products!Interested in learning more about Water Lentils and why you need them in your life?  Click here for more information about PONTUS proteins!The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
Is it just me or do we seem to be getting bigger more devastating wildfires every year? If it isn't fires across Canada, it's California, it's Australia, and it's even the Amazon rainforest. Is this more than normal and should we be worried?Wildfires are a natural part of many forests systems and help maintain forest health, but when we put out fires too quickly we can end up creating bigger fires for ourselves in the future.In this episode we will be discussing the effects that wildfires can have on our freshwater systems. We'll discuss the benefits, the negatives and how we should be reframing our conversation about wildfires on our landscapes. in this episode you will hear from Dr. Kevin Bladon from Oregon State University who studies how freshwater systems react after wildfires.Are you interested in getting more involved in managing your local watershed? If you live in Alberta you can find out which one you are a part of at the Alberta Watershed Councils website! Our local watershed councils are a fantastic resource to learn more about our natural areas and how to get involved on a regional scale!  Whether it's the Athabasca Watershed Council , the Bow River Basin Watershed Council or the North Saskatchewan Watershed Alliance they are all fantastic organizations to get involved with.To learn more about Dr. Kevin Bladon, his lab and the important research they are doing you can check out his lab website  right here the FEWS Lab.Interested in the effects of fire on Fort McMurray's drinking water? Click Here!
Is it just me or do we seem to be getting bigger more devastating wildfires every year? If it isn't fires across Canada, it's California, it's Australia, and it's even the Amazon rainforest. Is this more than normal and should we be worried? Wildfires are a natural part of many forests systems and help maintain forest health, but when we put out fires too quickly we can end up creating bigger fires for ourselves in the future. In this episode we will be discussing the effects that wildfires can have on our freshwater systems. We'll discuss the benefits, the negatives and how we should be reframing our conversation about wildfires on our landscapes. in this episode you will hear from Dr. Kevin Bladon from Oregon State University who studies how freshwater systems react after wildfires.Are you interested in getting more involved in managing your local watershed? If you live in Alberta you can find out which one you are a part of at the Alberta Watershed Councils website! Our local watershed councils are a fantastic resource to learn more about our natural areas and how to get involved on a regional scale!  Whether it's the Athabasca Watershed Council , the Bow River Basin Watershed Council or the North Saskatchewan Watershed Alliance they are all fantastic organizations to get involved with.To learn more about Dr. Kevin Bladon, his lab and the important research they are doing you can check out his lab website  right here the FEWS Lab.Interested in the effects of fire on Fort McMurray's drinking water? Click Here!The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
Did you know that the lands around Alberta's Rocky Mountains could become open pit coal mines? This has become quite the hot topic in the Province of Alberta as it was a decision that the government took without any consultation to the public or any stakeholder groups. This is precious land to not only Albertans but to many Canadians. It is also where Albertans and many people in Saskatchewan get their freshwater from and this is important because of the risk of pollution and contamination from new potential mines in our headwaters.In this episode we learn about the potential, environmental, economic and social impacts that these mines could impose if they are approved. You will hear from Colton Vessey, an Environmental Geochemistry PhD student from the University of Alberta. Colton is an expert on how mines affect water quality and how future mines might impact everyone in Alberta.Of course with any type of resource extraction we need to weigh the benefits and the drawbacks. Do you have an opinion on whether the coal mines should go forward or not?The Alberta Governments has its initial consultation survey that closes next monday April 19th, 2021 and they want to hear from you! Click Here to Fill it Out!Click Here to learn more about the Alberta Governments Coal consultation program going forward.Want to learn More?The Alberta Wilderness Association and Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (North and South Alberta Chapters) have lots of great information about this issue!Click here to read the opinion article Colton Vessey described about water licensing and the potential downstream effects from Benga Minings proposed Grassi Mountain Coal Mine at the headwaters of the Oldman River in Alberta, Canada.If you want to reach out to Colton Vessey with any questions about coal mining and the effects on water you can email him at vessey@ualberta.caClick Here to learn more about the Aquatic Biosphere Project!Mobile Solar Systems and Solutions! Go Power! is a trusted, recognized leader in mobile solar power technology and a Canadian company.The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
Did you know that the lands around Alberta's Rocky Mountains could become open pit coal mines? This has become quite the hot topic in the Province of Alberta as it was a decision that the government took without any consultation to the public or any stakeholder groups. This is precious land to not only Albertans but to many Canadians. It is also where Albertans and many people in Saskatchewan get their freshwater from and this is important because of the risk of pollution and contamination from new potential mines in our headwaters. In this episode we learn about the potential, environmental, economic and social impacts that these mines could impose if they are approved. You will hear from Colton Vessey, an Environmental Geochemistry PhD student from the University of Alberta. Colton is an expert on how mines affect water quality and how future mines might impact everyone in Alberta.Of course with any type of resource extraction we need to weigh the benefits and the drawbacks. Do you have an opinion on whether the coal mines should go forward or not?The Alberta Governments has its initial consultation survey that closes next monday April 19th, 2021 and they want to hear from you! Click Here to Fill it Out!Click Here to learn more about the Alberta Governments Coal consultation program going forward.Want to learn More?The Alberta Wilderness Association and Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (North and South Alberta Chapters) have lots of great information about this issue! Click here to read the opinion article Colton Vessey described about water licensing and the potential downstream effects from Benga Minings proposed Grassi Mountain Coal Mine at the headwaters of the Oldman River in Alberta, Canada.If you want to reach out to Colton Vessey with any questions about coal mining and the effects on water you can email him at vessey@ualberta.caClick Here to learn more about the Aquatic Biosphere Project!Mobile Solar Systems and Solutions! Go Power! is a trusted, recognized leader in mobile solar power technology and a Canadian company.The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
Invasive species are a huge problem around the world. Asian Carp are most well known for flying through the air, striking anyone out for a pleasure cruise on the river, but they have completely changed the ecology and ecosystems they have taken over. They have taken over the Mississippi river and they are headed for the Great Lakes and Canadian Waters!What are we doing to stop them?In this episode you will hear from the experts about why Asian Carp were brought to the United States, how they escaped, why they are flourishing and what we are doing to limit their spread.You will hear from Andrew Reeves, Author of the book "Overrun: Dispatches from the Asian Carp Crisis", Kevin Irons, Assistant Chief of the Fisheries Division from Illinois Department of Natural Resources, who runs the fishing program to keep asian carp away from the Great Lakes, and from Chuck Shea, US ARMY Corps of Engineers who man the underwater electric barricades keeping fish from the Mississippi river basin out of the Great Lakes.Want to learn More about Asian Carp?Check out AsianCarp.us and AsianCarp.ca for up to date information about Asian Carp in the US and Canada respectively.Check out Andrew Reeves book "Overrun: Dispatches from the Asian Carp Crisis".Check out I Fish Illinois for information about fishing in Illinois and their Carp Program. Worried about Transporting invasive Species? Check Out Be A Hero, Transport Zero for information on how to make sure you don't accidentally move any invasive species around.Click Here for more information about the US Army Corps of Engineers Underwater Barriers.Want to buy products made with Asian Carp? Check out some products below!Check out If You Can't Beat Em Eat Em to find Asian Carp tastings near you!Silverfin boneless Asian Carp fish cakesHot Dogs from Two Rivers FisheriesDog Treats from Wilder HarrierDog Food From Root LabTo learn more about the Aquatic Biosphere Project Click Here.The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
Invasive species are a huge problem around the world. Asian Carp are most well known for flying through the air, striking anyone out for a pleasure cruise on the river, but they have completely changed the ecology and ecosystems they have taken over. They have taken over the Mississippi river and they are headed for the Great Lakes and Canadian Waters!What are we doing to stop them?In this episode you will hear from the experts about why Asian Carp were brought to the United States, how they escaped, why they are flourishing and what we are doing to limit their spread.You will hear from Andrew Reeves, Author of the book "Overrun: Dispatches from the Asian Carp Crisis", Kevin Irons, Assistant Chief of the Fisheries Division from Illinois Department of Natural Resources, who runs the fishing program to keep asian carp away from the Great Lakes, and from Chuck Shea, US ARMY Corps of Engineers who man the underwater electric barricades keeping fish from the Mississippi river basin out of the Great Lakes.Want to learn More about Asian Carp?Check out AsianCarp.us and AsianCarp.ca for up to date information about Asian Carp in the US and Canada respectively.Check out Andrew Reeves book "Overrun: Dispatches from the Asian Carp Crisis".Check out I Fish Illinois for information about fishing in Illinois and their Carp Program. Worried about Transporting invasive Species? Check Out Be A Hero, Transport Zero for information on how to make sure you don't accidentally move any invasive species around.Click Here for more information about the US Army Corps of Engineers Underwater Barriers.Want to buy products made with Asian Carp? Check out some products below!Check out If You Can't Beat Em Eat Em to find Asian Carp tastings near you!Silverfin boneless Asian Carp fish cakesHot Dogs from Two Rivers FisheriesDog Treats from Wilder HarrierDog Food From Root LabTo learn more about the Aquatic Biosphere Project Click Here.The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
Invasive species are a huge problem around the world. Asian Carp are most well known for flying through the air, striking anyone out for a pleasure cruise on the river, but they have completely changed the ecology and ecosystems they have taken over. They have taken over the Mississippi river and they are headed for the Great Lakes and Canadian Waters!What are we doing to stop them?In this episode you will hear from the experts about why Asian Carp were brought to the United States, how they escaped, why they are flourishing and what we are doing to limit their spread.You will hear from Andrew Reeves, Author of the book "Overrun: Dispatches from the Asian Carp Crisis", Kevin Irons, Assistant Chief of the Fisheries Division from Illinois Department of Natural Resources, who runs the fishing program to keep asian carp away from the Great Lakes, and from Chuck Shea, US ARMY Corps of Engineers who man the underwater electric barricades keeping fish from the Mississippi river basin out of the Great Lakes.Want to learn More about Asian Carp?Check out AsianCarp.us and AsianCarp.ca for up to date information about Asian Carp in the US and Canada respectively.Check out Andrew Reeves book "Overrun: Dispatches from the Asian Carp Crisis".Check out I Fish Illinois for information about fishing in Illinois and their Carp Program. Worried about Transporting invasive Species? Check Out Be A Hero, Transport Zero for information on how to make sure you don't accidentally move any invasive species around.Click Here for more information about the US Army Corps of Engineers Underwater Barriers.Want to buy products made with Asian Carp? Check out some products below!Check out If You Can't Beat Em Eat Em to find Asian Carp tastings near you!Silverfin boneless Asian Carp fish cakesHot Dogs from Two Rivers FisheriesDog Treats from Wilder HarrierDog Food From Root LabTo learn more about the Aquatic Biosphere Project Click Here.The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
Invasive species are a huge problem around the world. Asian Carp are most well known for flying through the air, striking anyone out for a pleasure cruise on the river, but they have completely changed the ecology and ecosystems they have taken over. They have taken over the Mississippi river and they are headed for the Great Lakes and Canadian Waters! What are we doing to stop them?In this episode you will hear from the experts about why Asian Carp were brought to the United States, how they escaped, why they are flourishing and what we are doing to limit their spread. You will hear from Andrew Reeves, Author of the book "Overrun: Dispatches from the Asian Carp Crisis", Kevin Irons, Assistant Chief of the Fisheries Division from Illinois Department of Natural Resources, who runs the fishing program to keep asian carp away from the Great Lakes, and from Chuck Shea, US ARMY Corps of Engineers who man the underwater electric barricades keeping fish from the Mississippi river basin out of the Great Lakes.Want to learn More about Asian Carp?Check out AsianCarp.us and AsianCarp.ca for up to date information about Asian Carp in the US and Canada respectively.Check out Andrew Reeves book "Overrun: Dispatches from the Asian Carp Crisis".Check out I Fish Illinois for information about fishing in Illinois and their Carp Program. Worried about Transporting invasive Species? Check Out Be A Hero, Transport Zero for information on how to make sure you don't accidentally move any invasive species around.Click Here for more information about the US Army Corps of Engineers Underwater Barriers.Want to buy products made with Asian Carp? Check out some products below!Check out If You Can't Beat Em Eat Em to find Asian Carp tastings near you!Silverfin boneless Asian Carp fish cakesHot Dogs from Two Rivers FisheriesDog Treats from Wilder HarrierDog Food From Root LabTo learn more about the Aquatic Biosphere Project Click Here.The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
A study from McGill University, estimates the average Canadian consumes about 329L of water a day, the equivalent of more than 600 standard water bottles (500 ml). Think of your daily routine. In the morning you get up, you have a shower. Flush the toilet. Fill the water for your coffee or tea. Run the dishwasher. At lunchtime, you might boil some pasta. Later you might do some laundry. Before bedtime, you may might run a warm bath or put the kettle on for some hot tea. Sleep and repeat. As the population keeps growing, water consumption increases, and it becomes more difficult to access the blue gold in a sustainable way. In the long run, this can create water stress, a phenomenon that occurs when the water demand is higher than its availability. How can we prevent this problem and what solutions are available to us? In cities like Cape Town, South Africa, residents have been encouraged to follow a series of water-saving initiatives, from flushing the toilet when necessary to shower no longer than two minutes. But this doesn’t completely solve the issue from repeating itself. Are there any other solutions available? In the past, desalination has been considered a possible option to solve the water crisis. If you think about it, 70% of the Earth's surface is covered by water, and the oceans hold more than 95 % of all Earth water. Turning seawater into drinking water could help populations who face water stress and water scarcity to solve this problem. However, this isn’t as easy as it sounds. In today’s episode, Heather Cooley, Director of Research at the Pacific Institute, explains how desalination works, the impacts this can cause to the marine environment, and how unsustainable this practice can be.For more information about seawater desalination, water stress and the work that the Pacific Institute does Click Here.For more information on the Aquatic Biosphere Project and how we are telling the story of water Click Here.The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
A study from McGill University, estimates the average Canadian consumes about 329L of water a day, the equivalent of more than 600 standard water bottles (500 ml). Think of your daily routine. In the morning you get up, you have a shower. Flush the toilet. Fill the water for your coffee or tea. Run the dishwasher. At lunchtime, you might boil some pasta. Later you might do some laundry. Before bedtime, you may might run a warm bath or put the kettle on for some hot tea. Sleep and repeat. As the population keeps growing, water consumption increases, and it becomes more difficult to access the blue gold in a sustainable way. In the long run, this can create water stress, a phenomenon that occurs when the water demand is higher than its availability. How can we prevent this problem and what solutions are available to us? In cities like Cape Town, South Africa, residents have been encouraged to follow a series of water-saving initiatives, from flushing the toilet when necessary to shower no longer than two minutes. But this doesn’t completely solve the issue from repeating itself. Are there any other solutions available? In the past, desalination has been considered a possible option to solve the water crisis. If you think about it, 70% of the Earth's surface is covered by water, and the oceans hold more than 95 % of all Earth water. Turning seawater into drinking water could help populations who face water stress and water scarcity to solve this problem. However, this isn’t as easy as it sounds. In today’s episode, Heather Cooley, Director of Research at the Pacific Institute, explains how desalination works, the impacts this can cause to the marine environment, and how unsustainable this practice can be.For more information about seawater desalination, water stress and the work that the Pacific Institute does Click Here.For more information on the Aquatic Biosphere Project and how we are telling the story of water Click Here.The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
It's estimated that we lose 640,000 tonnes of fishing gear every year in our oceans. This gear continues to kill fish and other marine organisms and pollutes our marine environment with plastic. What are we doing about it?In this episode we speak with Joel Baziuk the Deputy Director of the Global Ghost Gear Initiative (GGGI) and Bourton Scott and Ally Stocks from the Emerald Sea Protection Society. Joel helps to coordinate global efforts to improve fishing gear to decrease the risks of it being lost at sea and to help coordinate global cleanup efforts. Bourton and Ally are part of a team that has partnered with the GGGI to help cleanup the waters around Vancouver Island.We talk about what's currently being done, what can be done in the future, how to get involved and what can be made from recycled nets pulled from the sea!For more information about the Global Ghost Gear Initiative, what they are working on and how you can get involved with their ghost gear reporting app for your phone Click Here.For more information about the Emerald Sea Protection Society and the nets they are removing off the coast of Vancouver Island Click Here.Check out the Following Brands for cool products made from Ghost Gear! Bureo for skateboards, clothing, frisbees, sunglasses, etc.Fourth Element for swimwear.Axiom for cycling gear.ECONYL for nylon clothing.BraceNet for bracelets.BlueCycle for furniture.Sea2See for glasses.Healthy Seas Socks for Socks.Popsicase for phone cases.2nd Chance Ropeworks for rugs.For more information about the Aquatic Biosphere Project and what we are doing to tell the story of water Click Here.The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
In this episode we speak about ghost fishing, how we can work together to improve fishing gear and how all of us can play a role in cleaning it up with Joel Baziuk, the Deputy Director of the Global Ghost Gear Initiative (GGGI) from the Ocean Conservancy. Joel helps to coordinate global efforts to improve fishing gear to decrease the risks of it being lost at sea and to help coordinate global cleanup efforts. We talk about what's currently being done, what can be done in the future, how to get involved and what can be made from recycled nets pulled from the sea!For more information about the Global Ghost Gear Initiative, what they are working on and how you can get involved with their ghost gear reporting app for your phone Click Here.Check out the Following Brands for cool products made from Ghost Gear! Bureo for skateboards, clothing, frisbees, sunglasses, etc.Fourth Element for swimwear.Axiom for cycling gear.ECONYL for nylon clothing.BraceNet for bracelets.BlueCycle for furniture.Sea2See for glasses.Healthy Seas Socks for Socks.Popsicase for phone cases.2nd Chance Ropeworks for rugs.For more information about the Aquatic Biosphere Project and what we are doing to tell the story of water Click Here.The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
In this episode we talk to Dr. Steve Hrudey the Chair of the COVID-19 Wastewater Coalition from the Canadian Water Network. Dr. Hrudey helps us understand how Wastewater Surveillance for COVID-19 works and how you can test samples from our sewers to understand where the virus has spread.The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted everyone across this planet, has tested our ability to adapt, develop and role out vaccines and figure out efficient ways to test and monitor our entire population.When testing is limited, what is the best way to understand the spread of a virus in a large population? You don't have to be a math whiz to know that being able to test an entire population with one sample versus testing everyone individually means a lot less work. This technology is becoming even more important as we begin tracking new variants within our communities and begin planning to protect ourselves for any potential future pandemics.To find out more about the wastewater surveillance for COVID-19 in Canada and the  Canadian Water Network COVID-19 Wastewater Coalition Click Here.To find out more about the Aquatic Biosphere Project Click Here.The Aquatic Bisophere Project The ABP is establishing a conservation Aquarium in the Prairies to help tell the Story of Water.
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