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Seattle Mennonite Church is an active Anabaptist Mennonite Christian congregation working faithfully at following Jesus in our urban context. All are welcome! Listen in to our Sunday morning sermons to get a sense of who we are.
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Scrolls of the heart

Scrolls of the heart

2020-11-2245:08

The prophet Jeremiah records in a scroll God's words for God's people. The King, cozied up to a warming fire in his winter apartment, takes a penknife to the scrolls, excising and then burning God's words for God's people. But God's words have already been read in the hearing of all God's people; have already been inscribed on their hearts. So when God instructs Jeremiah to create a new scroll with the old words, Jeremiah is not only able to do so, but "many similar words were added to them." God's words of truth, justice, liberation, belonging, and covenant are for all people, are indestructible, and are both living and fruitful, giving birth to more and more "similar words" as God's people live into new times and places. This is good news!--Sermon begins at 16:45Scripture: Jeremiah 36.1-8, 21-23, 27-28; 31.31-34 Photo: by Gaspar Uhas on Unsplash (detail)--Music:Come and see - Words and Music by Marilyn Hauser Hamm, © 1974.Come thou fount of every blessing - Words by Robert Robinson. Music Nettleton. Public Domain.The Love of God - Words and Music by F.M. Lehman, arr. Claudia Lehman Mays, © 1917.
As I've lived with Isaiah's bizarre, fantastical, and awe-some / terrifying vision, I began to experience it as a musical composition:Introduction - In the year that King Uzziah died...Movement 1 - The Skirts of GodMovement 2 - FrankensteinMovement 3 - HineniCoda - Prayer of the Seraphim: Holy, holy, holyOnce through, I played with a musical variation of the whole composition for our congregation . I'm eyes wide open on how cryptic this description is. Trust me: it's fitting. I invite you into the mystery... [sermon begins at 14:14]--Scripture: Isaiah 6.1-8 Image: Skirt (of God?)--Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.How Great Thou Art - Text & Music: © 1949, 1953 The Stuart Hine Trust CIO.I sought the Lord - Text: Anonymous, and written ca. 1878 (Public Domain); Music: J. Harold Moyer, © 1969 Faith and Life Press / Mennonite Publishing HouseMay the Lord, mighty God - Text: based on Numbers 6.24-26; Music: Adapted from Pau-chen Li’s “Wen-Ti”
Jonah is dramatically, laughably angry about God's mercy for the Ninevites, and carries on a stompy, pouty tantrum. Often I laugh at his expense; this week I relate. We also recall that God's mercy for Nineveh follows sincere repentance and reparation of harm on the part of the powerful; and that Jesus centered his life and ministry among those at the pointy end of the State's violence. May we seek to do the same as we spread the faith.  [sermon begins at 19:03; child dedication at 32:55]--Scripture: Jonah 3.1-10; 4.1-11Photo by Neil Fedorowycz on Unsplash--Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.Here in this place - Words and Music: Marty Haugen © 1981 GIA Publications.Lord we bring to you our children - Words: Frank von Christierson © 1976 The Hymn Society, Hope Publishing Co. Music: American Folks Melody.Other ResourcesJust as I am - Words: Charlotte Elliot, 1834. Music: English traditional.Hard Times Come Again No More - Words and Music: Stephen Foster 1894.When God Made You, by Matthew Paul Turner. Illustrated by David Catrow.
Just Enough for Today

Just Enough for Today

2020-11-0201:06:42

 We may be able to identify with the widow of Zarephath who, in a time of a devastating, nation-wide crisis feels ready to die.  In the midst of this certainty that she will not make it through, God provides a companion and the hope that each day she and her household will have just enough to make it.  Pastor Amy invites us to find hope in that idea that, though we will never be completely satisfied, when we feel alone and desperate God will give us the resources we need to make to the end of each day. Sermon begins at 27:23Texts1 Kings 17:1-16Full manuscript of the sermon, "Just Enough for Today"I Am One: A Book of Action by Susan Verde, pictures by Peter Reynolds.Music"My shepherd will supply my need" Music: American folk melody, harmonized by J. Harold Moyer, © 1969 Faith and Life Press"Just a closer walk with thee" Words and Music: North American traditional.Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved."He came down", Words and Music: Cameroon traditional. Arr. John Bell © 1990 Iona Community, GIA Publications."Water has held us," Words: R. Deane Postlewaite. © 1978 Marjeane Postwaite. Music: Gaelic melody, harmonization by Martin Shaw © Oxford University Press.
From the womb of wild nature, Pastor Jonathan reflects on King David, new to kingship and in love with his royal residence.  God too should have a divine place to dwell, David thinks! But God reminds David that the Divine has always dwelt with the people, roamed in the wilderness and been present in and through all things.  Pastor Jonathan reminds us that our indigenous relatives have always understood this and that like King David, we have some un-learning to do about our desire to domesticate God. (Sermon begins at 18:45.  You'll hear rain and weather in the background but hopefully that adds ambience!)Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.Come Walk With Us, Text: South African traditional, trans. Gerhard Cartford © Luthern World Foundation. Music: South African traditional, arr. Anders Nyberg © 1984 Utryck; Walton Music Corp.Other ResourcesO Healing River. Text: anonymous. Music: North American traditional.Where Does God Live? by Holly Bea"The Healing is Going On", by Michael Bade. Used by permission of the artist.Image: Pastor Jonathan on his excursion to Cle Elum Lake Watershed north of Roslyn WA
Hannah's prayers

Hannah's prayers

2020-10-1845:59

Both in her "wretched" distress and joyous confidence, Hannah prays. She brings her "hot, holy mess" to her God, and she also prophetically sings of God's joyous and just Jubilee vision before it is visible to her or realized in the world. Perhaps her witness can serve as an invitation to those us of us also feeling a hot mess, whether or not we ever get our happily ever after. [reading from 1 Samuel in the voices of many SMC women and girls at 17:40; sermon begins at 21:03]--Scripture: 1 Samuel 1:9-11, 19-20; 2:1-10Image: photo by Miguel Bautista on Unsplash--Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.In the Bulb there is a flower - Words and music by Natalie Sleeth, © 1986 Hope Publishing CompanyWe give thanks unto you - Words and music by Marty Haugen, © 1987 GIA Publications, Inc.Great is thy faithfulness - Words by Thomas Chisolm, Music by William M. Runyan, ©1923, 1951 Hope Publishing CompanyOther Resources:Je louerai l'Eternel (Praise, I will praise you, Lord) - Words and Music (French) by Claude Frayssé, 1975, harmonization by Alaine Bergèse, © 1976.  Translation by Kenneth I. Morse, © 1988 The Hymnal ProjectCall to worship: Re:Worship
When Love IS Anger

When Love IS Anger

2020-10-1150:08

God is angry at the Hebrew people over their casting of a golden calf for false worship, mere months after God has liberated them from slavery. God is angry. SO angry, in fact, that God seems ready to destroy them all... again. God ultimately relents from punishment and destruction, thanks to Moses and remembered belovedness. But the whole story prompts Pastor Megan to ponder her/our desire for a God of love, the reality of God's anger, and how often love looks more like anger than civility. Come along for the ride and let us know what you think! [sermon begins at 19:50]--Scripture: Exodus 32.1-14Photo: www.pexels.com--Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.Over my head - Text & Tune: African American spiritual; arr. by John L. Bell, © 1997, Iona Community, GIA Publications, Inc.The Lord is my light - Text & Tune: Lillian Bouknight; arr. Paul Gainer, © 1980 Savgos Music, Inc.There's a wideness in God's mercy - Text: Frederick W. FaberIn the morning when I rise - Text & Tune: African American spiritual; Other ResourcesCall to worship - from Ministry Matters, by Nancy TownlyTune (THE SERVANT SONG): Richard Gillard © 1977, Universal Music - Brentwood Benson Publishing; adapted by Betty PulkinghamIn the morning when I rise - harmonization arr. by Wendell Whalum © 1978 Lawson-Gould Music Publishers, Inc.Children’s Time book - Ladybug Girl and the Best Ever Playdate, by Jacky Davis, ill. by David Soman
The Mennonite congregations across Washington State worked together to create a celebration video in honor of Mennonite Central Committee turning 100 years old. Normally we would have gathered this weekend for the annual Mennonite Country Auction, but this year we had to get creative about how to connect and experience community with one another. Listen to our full worship service here, but when you get to the celebration video at minute 14:15, consider switching over to youtube to actually WATCH it!--IMAGE: Mennonite Central Committee, centennial celebration logo--Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.Now thank we all our God - Text: Martin Rinkart, 1636; tr. by Catherine Winkworth, 1858; Music: Johann Crüger, 1647; adapt. by Felix Mendelssohn, 1840Come, Holy Spirit, descend - Words & Music: John L. Bell © 1994, GIA / Iona Community (Scotland) / WGRGOther Resources:Washington Mennonite Fellowship: centennial celebration of Mennonite Central Committee - Video editing: Bryce Miller - www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6IR5MHyo6w Music in video: World of Mystery - Words & Music: Michael Bade © 2018Music in video: True Evangelical Faith - Text: Menno Simons; Music: Larry Nickel; Performed by: West Coast Mennonite Chamber Choir, 1991, directed by Tony Funk - www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmGZJA3kWkI
As a powerful Egyptian ruler, Joseph welcomes his family back into relationship and care saying, "Even though you intended to do harm to me, God intended it for good."  Though many people interpret this to mean that terror or trauma experienced by people or creation is a part of a Divine plan.  But God's dream for humanity is not terror but love and connection.  It is dreamers like Joseph who connect us to the dream of God and who can inspire us to continue to pursue God's dream.Sermon begins at 19:25Transcript can be found here.Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.Here in this place, Words & Music: Marty Haugen, © 1982, GIA Publications, Inc.Response Music - I am sure I shall see the goodness of the Lord (Taize) Music: Taizé, © 2003 Ateliers et Presses de Taizé, GIA Publications, Inc.; Text: Public DomainMy life flows on, Words & Music: Robert Lowry, 1869Other ResourcesLet there be light, Lord God, Words: William M. Vories, 1908, Public Domain; Music: Charles H. C. Zeuner, 1832, Public Domain
We joined with Mennonite World Conference congregations around the globe in celebrating Peace Sunday. According to 1 Corinthians, when one of us suffers all of us suffer, and when one of us rejoices all of us rejoice. This, we as global Mennonites were urged to recognize, is peacemaking as accompaniment and solidarity. We got to hear a powerful story from our own Sarah Augustine of solidarity with the Wayana indigenous peoples of Suriname, and specifically with her friend Linia, who longs to protect her children and community from the mercury poisoning in their food supply due to extractive gold mining. [Regrettably, I failed to begin the recording until Pastor Amy's time with children, so the audio recording begins rather abruptly ... sermon begins at 9:35] --Scripture: 1 Corinthians 12.12-27Photo: Mennonite World Conference, Peace Sunday--Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.The love of God - Words & Music: F. M. Lehman, arr by Claudia Lehman Mays, Public DomainBwana awabariki (May God grant you a blessing) - Words & Music: Swahili melody & folk hymn, Public DomainOther ResourcesMennonite World Conference, Peace Sunday 2020 worship resourceWe are people of God's peace, Words: Menno Simons, 1552, tr. Esther Bergen, © 1990 Mennonite World Conference; Music: Johann Hom, Public DomainYou're Not Alone, words and music by Bryan Moyer Suderman. Used with permission.Suriname Indigenous Health Fund, www.sihfund.org
We are back to the Narrative Lectionary, and we kick off this year's journey through the biblical text with a Genesis creation account. In it, humans are created from the earth, for the plants, intrinsically connected to one another, and intimately sculpted and in-spired by God our Maker. Almost as soon as these relationships with earth, humans, and God are crafted, there is fracturing of our primal inter-connectedness. Is there any word of hope for we who are choking on the wildfire smoke of those fractures today? [Sermon begins at 22:55]--Scripture: Genesis 2.4b-7, 15-17; 3.1-8Image: Photo by SwapnIl Dwivedi on Unsplash--Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.Woza nomthwalo wakho (Come, bring your burdens to God) - Text & Music: collected by Mairi Munro from the singing of the Mooiplaas congregation, South Africa - © 2008, admin WGRG The Iona Community (Scotland)Spirit, working in creation (Hymn to the Spirit) - Text: © 1978, John Richards. Music: attributed to C. F. Witt, Psalmodia Sacra, 1715; adapted by Henry J. Gauntlett, 1861  Sizohamba naye (We will walk with God) - Text & Music: Swaziland traditional; translated by John L. Bell; transcribed by Swedish Youth Exchange Project, © 2002, WGRG The Iona Community (Scotland), used by permission of GIA Publications, Inc., agentOther ResourcesPlanet of the Clowns, by Bruce Cockburn; sung and played by Michael BadeWhen God Was a Little Girl, by David R. Weiss
We spend one final summer week with commentator Willie James Jennings, the Book of Acts, Paul imprisoned (yet again...), and the Holy Spirit calling Jesus-followers into common life and common space with one another. [sermon begins at 20:38] --Scripture: Acts 28:16-31Photo by Karim MANJRA on Unsplash--Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.Longing for light - Words and Music by Bernadette Farrell. © 1993 Published by OCPYou shall go out with joy - Music by Stuart Dauermann, Text adapted from Is. 55:12 by Steffi Geiser Rubin. © 1975, Lillenas Publishing CompanyOther credits:In the morning when I rise - Words and Music: traditional; spiritualBook - The Colors of Us by Karen Katz - Read by Pastor Amy on YouTube
In this last Sunday of hearing from in our summer series: Jerrell Williams, pastor of Salem Mennonite Church, a fellow Pacific Northwest Mennonite Conference congregation.  Jerrell takes us on a journey with Hagar into the wilderness, a journey in which she encounters and names God El Roi, the God-Who-Sees-Me.  This God who sees is also the God who walks with, who accompanies, who facilitates Hagar's survival and blesses Hagar with the promise that through her son Ishmael she has birthed a nation.  This blessing and accompaniment by God undercuts the white Christian notion that blessing is equated with prosperity or possessions.  Blessing is with those who are oppressed, who are marginalized, which is where we are called to be also. (Sermon starts at 20:35)Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.Jesus Loves Me - Text: Anna B. Warner, 1859; Music: William B. Bradbury, 1862Hamba Nathi / Come, Walk with Us - Text (English Translation)  © Lutheran World Federation, Tune Arrangement: Anders Nyberg, Gerhard Cartford © Peace of Music Publishing AB, admin. Walton Music Corp.My Soul Cries Out (Canticle of the turning) - Words and Music Rory Cooney © 1990, GIA Publications, Inc.Other credits:Book - I Am Enough by Grace Byers, illustrations by Keturah A. BoboScripture - Genesis 21.8-21
Citizen Discipleship

Citizen Discipleship

2020-08-1748:08

"Disciples of Jesus should be desperate citizens. The desperate citizen will press their citizenship as far as possible for the sake of thwarting death and its agents." Pastor Amy explores the work of theologian Willie James Jennings and discusses the way our citizenship in nation should be engaged in relationship to our citizenship in the Reign of God.  Now is not the time to opt out, when so many have had to fight desperately to be included.Sermon begins at 22:32Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.Jesus Loves Me - Text: Anna B. Warner, 1859; Music: William B. Bradbury, 1862What does the Lord Require - Words and Music by Jim Strathdee © 1986 Desert Flower Music/Jim and Jean Strathdee.Other credits and resources:Seek ye first the kingdom of God - Words and Music by Karen Lafferty © 1972 Maranatha Music.Preaching to the Chickens: the story of young John Lewis, by Jabari Asim. Illustrated by E. B. Lewis.Scripture:  Acts 25:1-12PHOTO: lettering by Amy Marie Epp, 2020Read more about the Acts Commentary by Willie James JenningsPass the Peace in America Sign LanguageLand Acknowledgement: Real Rent DuwamishOffering: donations to Seattle Mennonite Church
We continue our summer worship series in which we listen to and learn from Black preachers. Today: Shannon Dycus, former pastor of First Mennonite Church in Indianapolis IN, and current Dean of Students at Eastern Mennonite University. We listened to Shannon’s 2016 sermon, delivered at Christian Theological Seminary, in which she in which she invites us to consider lament - Jesus’ and our own - in light of Jesus' image of our mother hen God gathering her brood to her breast with tenderness and vulnerability. [Sermon begins at 19:00, prayers at 34:35.]---Luke 13.31-35PHOTO: lettering by Amy Marie Epp, 2020---Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.Come thou fount - Text: Robert Robinson, 1758; Music: American folk melody, J. Wyeth's Repository of Sacred Music, Part Second, 1813 - public domain.Jesus Loves Me - Text: Anna B. Warner, 1859; Music: William B. Bradbury, 1862Other credits:Holy Spirit, come with power - Text: ©1970 Anne N. Rupp; Music: The Sacred Harp, 1844; harm. by Joan A Fyock ©1989, from Hymnal: A Worship Book, 26Children’s Time book: The Last Stop on Market Street, by Matt de la Peña
We continue our summer worship series in which we listen to and learn from Black preachers. Today: Austin Channing Brown, author of best-selling book, I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness, and a powerful preacher. We listened to Austin's sermon, from the Evolving Faith Conference 2018, in which she revisits the story of Rizpah, whose sons were killed by King David because of their potential claim to the throne as descendants of former King Saul. In an act of final revenge against King Saul, Rizpah’s sons were hung on an open mountain hillside to decay in reach of scavenging birds and predators. Rizpah was outraged by the murder of her innocent sons, and climbed to the top of the hill where they hung in order to defend their bodies for weeks on end. In her anger and her grief, Rizpah stood up to power to fight for justice and dignity for her sons. [Sermon begins at 17:00, prayers at 38:10.]---2 Samuel 21.1-14PHOTO: lettering by Amy Marie Epp, 2020---Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.He came down - Words & Music: Cameroon traditional; Arr. by John L. Bell, ©1990, Iona Community, GIA Publications, Inc., exclusive agentJesus Loves Me - Text: Anna B. Warner, 1859; Music: William B. Bradbury, 1862Other credits:Be Our Strength in Times of Trouble, Reunion Vocal Band, ©2020 Michael Bade, used with permissionChildren’s Time book: Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson.
Nothing about the yoke of intractable racism feels easy. Nothing about the burden of a runaway pandemic feels light. Is there any good news at all in these supposedly comforting words of Jesus? And what's the deal with all those words of judgment that *precede* the supposed comfort? Pastor Megan explores the good news of a well-placed "y'all" and steals her most memorable line (attributed, of course) from Pastor Melanie, "I'm in it for the shalom, [y'all]!" You'll have to listen in to connect all those dots. [sermon begins at 16:40]---Matthew 11:20-30Image: Lettering by Amy Marie Epp, 2020---Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.O Let all Who Thirst - Words & music © John B. Foley S.J. 1978 Other credits:You've got a place - Music & Words: traditional spiritualJust as I am, without one plea - Words by Charlotte Elliot, 1834. Music traditional English
We continue our summer worship series in which we listen to and learn from Black preachers. Today: Glen Guyton, the Executive Director of our denomination, Mennonite Church USA. He loves pie and is funny (though his wife may disagree). And he preaches a good word: When we flee from our path, or lock ourselves away in fear, God invites us back again and again ("I got you..."), and Jesus breathes the Holy Spirit on us, empowering us for the work of transformation and perhaps even some "good trouble" (RIP John Lewis). Sermon - "The Journey" - begins at 20:45.--Genesis 28.10-22; John 20.19-22PHOTO: lettering by Amy Marie Epp, 2020--Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.As I went down to the river - Music & Words: American folk song, arr. ©2004 James E. ClemensOther credits:You've got a place - Music & Words: traditional spiritualJubilee - Music & Words: ©2018 Michael Bade, used with permissionSermon - “The Journey,” Glen GuytonFollow the Drinking Gourd: An Underground Railroad Story, retold by Cari Meister, consultant David Burgess
 We begin our summer worship series in which we listen and learn from Black preachers.  We start with Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III, pastor of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago.  With him we cry in lament for Ahmaud Arbery and so many other Black lives lost to the violence of white supremacy.  With him we reach back into the history, celebrating the ingenuity, genius and resilience of Black people in American from enslaved to this moment.  With him we are called from prayer into action on behalf of Black lives. Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.Hamba nathi (Come, walk with us) - Music & Words: South African Traditional; Arrangement by Anders Nyberg, ©1984 Peace of Music Publishing AB, admin. Walton Music Corp. Text: English translation by Gerhard Cartford, ©Lutheran World FederationThe Lord is my light - Music & Words: Lillian Bouknight; Arrangement by Paul Gainer, ©1980 Savgos Music, Inc., admin. Malaco Music GroupOther credits:You've got a place - Music & Words: traditional spiritualSermon - “The Cross and the Lynching Tree: A Requiem for Ahmaud Arbery,” Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III. To support the mission and ministry of Trinity United Church of Christ: http://bit.ly/TUCCSECUREGIVE, or CashApp: $TrinityUCCChildren's Time - Let's Talk About Race by Julius Lester
In our annual Interdependence Day worship - on the Sunday nearest the 4th - we again expose the lie of supposed independence, and instead claim the joy of justly-ordered mutual dependence and collective liberation! Willie James Jennings's fiery, faithful commentary is our conversation partner as we engage the imprisoned Jesus-followers in the Book of Acts. We know that God's deepest desire is for the shaking of every prison foundation, the liberation of each imagination, and the release of every captive - on both sides of the prison bars. Thanks be to God! [sermon begins at 29:50]+++Acts 16.25-40Photo by Jean-Guy Nakars on Unsplash+++Permission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.Slowing Turning - Words by Delorses Dufner © 2003, GIA Publications, Inc., Music Gaelic traditional, harmonization by Richard Proulx © 1975, GIA Publications, Inc.Other credits:You've got a place - words and music traditional spiritualSom’lan dela (We will follow) - Words and music Zimbabwean traditional
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