DiscoverUnexplainable
Unexplainable
Claim Ownership

Unexplainable

Author: Vox

Subscribed: 4,171Played: 24,918
Share

Description

Unexplainable is a science show about everything we don’t know. Host Noam Hassenfeld is joined by an array of experts and Vox reporters each week to look at the most fascinating unanswered questions in science and the mind-bending ways scientists are trying to answer them. New episodes drop every Wednesday starting March 10. From Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.

12 Episodes
Reverse
A new force of nature?

A new force of nature?

2021-05-1224:432

Last month, physicists at Fermilab in Illinois found that tiny subatomic particles called muons were wobbling strangely. This small observation could transform the future of particle physics, potentially pointing toward undiscovered particles or maybe even a new force of nature. For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to sign up for our newsletter, view show transcripts, and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! unexplainable@vox.com We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Placebos work. Why?

Placebos work. Why?

2021-05-0525:359

For decades, scientists thought that placebos only worked if patients didn’t know they were taking them. Not anymore: You can give patients placebos, tell them they’re on sugar pills, and they still might feel better. No one is sure how this works, but it raises a question: Should doctors embrace placebos in mainstream medicine? For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to sign up for our newsletter, view show transcripts, and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! unexplainable@vox.com We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
In 2016, the UN declared antibiotic-resistant bacteria the “greatest and most urgent global risk.” Our best hope just might be phages, or viruses that attack bacteria. Phages’ potential is enormous, but so is everything we don’t know about them. For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to sign up for our newsletter, view show transcripts, and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! unexplainable@vox.com. We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Every day, untold numbers of strange organisms rise from the middle of the ocean to its surface. They may be playing a crucial role in slowing climate change, so scientists are struggling to understand this migration ... before it’s too late. For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to sign up for our newsletter, view show transcripts, and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! unexplainable@vox.com. We read every email.  Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Scientists don’t understand why so many people suffer from Covid-19 symptoms for months, well after they stop testing positive. But that’s just the start of the mystery. There are other diseases that cast these long shadows, and they point to a major blind spot in medicine. For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to sign up for our newsletter, view show transcripts, and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! unexplainable@vox.com We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
A decade ago, psychologists realized much of their science was fatally flawed, calling untold numbers of studies into question. Now, some young psychologists are trying to rebuild the foundations of their field. Can they succeed? For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to sign up for our newsletter, view show transcripts, and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! unexplainable@vox.com We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
It’s ball lightning!

It’s ball lightning!

2021-03-3126:244

For millennia, people have been reporting stories of mysterious spheres of light that glow, crackle, and hover eerily during thunderstorms. They’ve been spotted in people’s homes, and are even said to be able to pass through windows. No one knows how ball lightning forms — but that’s not stopping scientists from attempting to recreate it in their labs. For further reading, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to sign up for our newsletter, view show transcripts, and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! unexplainable@vox.com We read every email.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Skeleton Lake

Skeleton Lake

2021-03-2426:2110

When scientists examined the DNA of ancient bones found near a Himalayan lake, they were forced to confront a seemingly impossible conclusion. *This episode has been updated. In the original version, we mixed up carbon isotopes with carbon isotope ratios. For further reading, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to sign up for our newsletter, view show transcripts, and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! unexplainable@vox.com We read every email. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Sixty years ago, geologists tried to drill down through the Earth’s crust to pull up a piece of the Earth’s mantle. Their mission didn’t go exactly as planned. But it sowed the seeds for a new field of science that’s helped us rewrite not only the history of the planet, but, potentially, our definitions of life itself. The documentaries featured in this episode are "The First Deep Ocean Drilling: Mohole, Phase 1" and "Project Mohole: Report No. 1." For further reading, sign up for our newsletter here:  http://vox.com/unexplainable-newsletter Show transcript and articles at:  http://vox.com/unexplainable Email us! unexplainable@vox.com We read every email. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
No one nose

No one nose

2021-03-1029:013

Believe it or not, scientists still don't know how the sense of smell works. But they're looking at how powerful it is - dogs can actually sniff out cancer and many other diseases - and they're trying to figure out how to reverse engineer it. In fact, one MIT scientist may have built a robot nose ... without completely understanding how his invention works. For further reading, sign up for our newsletter here: http://vox.com/unexplainable-newsletter Show transcript and articles at: http://vox.com/unexplainable Article on quantum nose theory: https://bit.ly/3clurfs Email us! unexplainable@vox.com We read every email. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Scientists all over the world are searching for dark matter: an invisible, untouchable substance that holds our universe together. But they haven't found it. Are they chasing a ghost? For further reading, sign up for our newsletter here: http://vox.com/unexplainable-newsletter Show transcript and articles (including one about why we made this show now): http://vox.com/unexplainable Email us! unexplainable@vox.com We read every email. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Scientists don’t know what 95% of the universe is made of. They don’t know how a bike stays up. They don’t even really know how the nose works. Join us every Wednesday on Unexplainable for deep dives into the unknown, because what we don’t know is awesome. New episodes March 10th. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Comments (15)

John Lewis

I love the theme song at the top! great job!!!!

May 12th
Reply

Alexis

27:17 there's an abrupt cut to the end or at least it seems to be :(

May 5th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

😱 holy wow!

Apr 16th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

This was kind of terrifying. I don't want science to be wrong. I don't want scientists to let pride get in the way of solid research. I don't want funding and politics and human failure to influence results. 😬

Apr 9th
Reply

Dylan

I got hard oxenfree vibes from that little audio bit after the ad break

Apr 2nd
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

so cool!!!

Apr 1st
Reply

HiKi GaYa

good podcast

Mar 27th
Reply (1)

SamxReal

Great! More more

Mar 25th
Reply

John Buckner

The junior high presentation killed it. If your target audience is 12 yr olds, fine, but if not, please drop the giggles, the "super doopers", and the gee-whiz comments.

Mar 17th
Reply

HiKi GaYa

excited

Mar 16th
Reply (1)

Happy⚛️Heritic

Very interesting

Mar 12th
Reply (2)
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store