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In this week's episode of Conversations with Kenyatta, Kenyatta (host of PBS' Genealogy Roadshow and author of The Family Tree Toolkit) is joined by Dr. Sharon M. Leon, a digital humanities professor at Michigan State University.Sharon is also behind The Jesuit Plantation Project: An Examination of the Enslaved persons Owned (and Sold) by the Maryland Province Jesuits, 1717-1838 and has done critical work in advancing how we store our records, as well as how we communicate about the past.Find out more about her at her website here: https://history.msu.edu/people/faculty/sharon-leon/The music for this episode, as always was "Good Vibe" by Ketsa.
On this episode of Conversations with Kenyatta,  Kenyatta D. Berry, author of The Family Tree Toolkit, and host of PBS' Genealogy Roadshow is joined by Dr. Christy Clark-Pujara, who is not only a professor of history, but also the author of Dark Work: The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island .They speak about a topic not often talked about in history or genealogy: slavery in the north. It's a fascinating conversation about what Dr. Clark-Pujara has learned, and how our historical misconceptions need to be addressed. The music for this episode, as always, is "Good Vibe" by Ketsa. 
In this episode, Kenyatta D. Berry, host of PBS' Genealogy Roadshow, author of The Family Tree Toolkit, and motivational speaker, is joined by Bessida Cauthorne White. Bessida is a former attorney, who is known for her activism, and her work as a professional genealogist. The music for this episode, as always, is "Good Vibe," by Ketsa.
This week on Conversations with Kenyatta, Kenyatta D. Berry, host of PBS' Genealogy Roadshow, and author of The Family Tree Toolkit features Heather Smith, who is the Co-Founder and Chief Visionary Officer for StoryFile.Heather's company is on a mission to record over 100 million stories - to help preserve our history in a new way. It's a fascinating conversation.Heather and StoryFile were also gracious enough to offer my listeners a coupon code for StoryFile - if you use the code KENYATTA you will receive 20% off their product. .......#enslavedancestors #enslavedancestry #genealogy #genealogytrauma #ancestralhealing #familyhistory #familyhistoryresearch #familyhistoryresearcher #podcastersofinstagram #podcast #historypodcast #genealogypodcast #genealogyrecords #findingmyfamily #kenyattaberry
This week Kenyatta D. Berry, author of The Family Tree Toolkit, and host of PBS' Genealogy Roadshow  speaks with Data Historian and author Dan Bouk. The two discuss a critical part of all genealogy research - census records. Items discussed in this episode: Bureau of the Census, Negro Population 1790-1915 (1918)  https://hdl.handle.net/2027/uiug.30112004120298?urlappend=%3Bseq=8Kelly Miller, “Enumeration Errors in Negro Population,” Scientific Monthly 14, no. 2 (1922): 168-177 https://www.jstor.org/stable/6436#metadata_info_tab_contentsLangston Hughes, "Madam and the Census Man" performed by Margaret Walker: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40GyoFE6GAgTammy Hepps, "When Henry Silverstein Got Cold: Fraud in the 1920 Census," https://homesteadhebrews.com/articles/when-henry-silverstein-got-cold/And as always, the music for this episode was "Good Vibe," by Ketsa.
In this episode, Kenyatta D. Berry, author of The Family Tree Toolkit, and host of PBS' Genealogy Roadshow is joined by Stacy Ashmore Cole, who is the creator and curator of “They Had Names: African Americans in Early Liberty County, Georgia, Records,” an online compilation of antebellum Liberty County probate, deed, church and other records with more than 37,000 references to African Americans, enslaved and free. She and Kenyatta discuss different records, as well as the necessity of those who have information on the enslaved to share it. It is an empowering conversation that will leave listeners wanting to dig right back into their research.In addition, Stacy provided the following links for those looking for help with their ancestry in Georgia, and on the coast:  They Had Names: African Americans in Early Records of Liberty County, Georgia: https://theyhadnames.net/Liberty County Historical Society: https://www.libertyhistory.net/Midway Museum: https://www.themidwaymuseum.org/ (located next to the Midway Congregational Church, which was founded in 1754. Although a Church dominated by White planter families, it has had documented Black members since 1756. The current Church building dates from 1792 and no longer operates as a Church. The Midway Museum tells its story and the history of the surrounding area.)Dorchester Academy (historic African American School that has a wonderful African American Museum about antebellum Midway history and also a Civil Rights exhibit -- Martin Luther King spent quite a bit of time there): HomeCoastal Georgia Genealogy links: GlynnGen.com: http://www.glynngen.com/: founded by Amy Hedrick, who has been researching coastal Georgia since her late teens (over 20 years now). Includes many African American genealogy resources. Ujima Genealogy of Coastal Georgia: focused on African American genealogy of coastal Georgia: https://ujimagen.org/ (great videos)Coastal Georgia Genealogical Society: https://coastalgagensociety.org/Burning of Darien Museum (no longer has a physical space but has enthusiastic volunteers who focus on African American history and genealogy of McIntosh County): https://www.facebook.com/TheBurnOfDarienThe music for this episode, as always, was "Good Vibe" by Ketsa. 
This week on Conversations with Kenyatta, Kenyatta is joined by Niya Bates, a PhD Candidate at Princeton who considers herself to be a public historian. Niya discussed what it means to be interested in public history, as well as what it means to chronicle your own genealogy and how you can get started with something as simple as a question.The music for this episode, as always, is "Good Vibe" by Ketsa.
This week on the podcast, Kenyatta D. Berry, host of PBS' Genealogy Roadshow and author of The FamilyTree Toolkit, debuts a new segment for Conversations with Kenyatta. These bite-sized episodes tackle forgotten individuals in history, whose stories need to be told. In this episode, Kenyatta examines Florence B. Price, an American composer whose work was thought to be lost in time - until one fateful day in 2009. 
This week on Conversations with Kenyatta, Kenyatta D. Berry is joined by Dr. Bettye Kearse, author of The Other Madisons, which examines her relation to a found ing father, and what her journey has looked like, and what she's learned. 
This week on Conversations with Kenyatta, Kenyatta D. Berry,  author of The Family Tree Toolkit, and host of PBS' Genealogy Roadshow is joined by Lynne Jackson, President, and Founder of The Dred Scott Heritage Foundation, and descendant of Dred Scott. The two discuss the foundation, who Dred Scott was, and why his case is pivotal to many. SHOW NOTES AND IMPORTANT LINKS: Website  www.dredscottlives.org (2016 - Present)Archived website www.thedredscottfoundation.org (2006-2016)Join us for the closing of FACES OF DRED SCOTT exhibit on Friday evening, Sept 30th from 4:30 - 7:30 p.m.and for the Opening of the 4th Exhibit this Fall sharing history on millionaire entrepreneur and philanthropist  Annie Malone at the Dred Scott Office Center in Chesterfield, MO beginning Oct 15 4:30 p.m.December 1st DSHF is collaborating with the Missouri History Museum and others in Celebrating Music Education in the Ville"  Honoring music legends Alleda Ward Wells and Kenneth Brown Billups. 
On this episode of Conversations with Kenyatta, Kenyatta D.  Berry, author of The Family Tree Toolkit, and host of PBS' Genealogy Roadshow  sits down with Regina Mason, who is a direct descendant of William Grimes. The two discuss what genealogy means, especially to those who were enslaved, or who have African Roots, and why that's been taboo to discuss in the past, and even today. They also dive into Gina's Journey, a film about Regina's experiences with her genealogy, as well as her book, which focuses on her ancestor, William Grimes.The music for this episode, as always, is "Good Vibe," by Ketsa.
On this special 30th episode of Conversations with Kenyatta, Kenyatta is joined by Dr. Joshua Rothamn, Professor of history and current department chair of the University of Alabama.  Dr. Rothman and Kenyatta discuss his books, his work researching the enslaved, as well as what trauma for enslaved individuals through their oppressors looks like, and how historical figures did their best to help in times of enslavement. 
This week, Kenyatta D. Berry, host of PBS' Genealogy Roadshow, author of The Family Tree Toolkit, and motivational speaker is joined by Dr. Kari Winter, a professor of American Studies at the University of Buffalo. She and Kenyatta discuss her book, The Blind African Slave: or, Memoirs of Boyrereau Brinch, Nick-named Jeffrey Brace, how literature and the portrayal of Black characters has influenced her work, and what her upcoming projects are.Dr. Winter served as director of the University of Buffalos Institute for Research and Education on Women and Gender (Gender Institute), which supports research on women and on the intricate connections between gender and other social forces, such as sexuality, race, class, health, age, religion and place.In addition, she has focused on spearheading "Reclaiming Our Ancestors," a national network of scholars, artists, and activists aimed to promote racial justice and public history through focusing on attention on 18th- and 19th-century African Americans and their descendants in the 21st century. She also is working with a team of filmmakers based in Vermont to create a television series about 18th- and 19th-century multicultural people in northern New England, primarily African Americans and Abenakis.The music for this episode, as always, is "Good Vibe," by Ketsa.
 This week on Conversations with Kenyatta, I'm joined by Antoinette Harrell, and it's a fascinating conversation.We dive not only into her work but what it means to be a genealogist and an activist, in an episode that's sure to inspire you in multiple ways.  
 This week on Conversations with Kenyatta, I'm joined by Dr. Valerie Johnson, the Dean of Arts and Science for Shaw University. We have a wonderful conversation on everything from redlining and what Dr. Johnson had to experience growing up, and what she has been working on now - including teaching me about a new record set! 
In this episode, Kenyatta D. Berry, host of Genealogy Roadshow and author of The Family Tree Toolkit, talks with author and genealogist John F. Baker, Jr. Find out more about him, and his work here: https://wessyngton.com/
In this episode, Kenyatta D. Berry, host of Genealogy Roadshow and author of The Family Tree Toolkit speaks with Richard Cox, who is the consultant and project manager for the Digital Library on American Slavery, as well as the People not Property Project. He and Kenyatta talk about what it means to use records, how digitizing records helps everyone, and, about beer, and its liberating properties. Really! Find the Digital Library on American Slavery here: http://dlas.uncg.edu/The music for this episode, as always, is "Good Vibe," by Ketsa. 
This week Kenyatta D. Berry, host of The Genealogy Roadshow, and author of The Family Tree Toolkit, is joined by Oliver Franklin, who is potentially one of her most interesting guests. From being a diplomat to special credentials given to him by the Queen herself, his life is a fascinating glimpse into the history of diplomacy, as well as how Black ancestors were regarded in different countries. 
In this episode of Conversations with Kenyatta, Kenyatta updates her listeners with a new segment called "Keeping Up with Kenyatta," which discusses where her research is heading - and how you may be able to help. Additionally, she talks about why Black History is important - and not just in February. 
This week, Kenyatta D. Berry, host of The Genealogy Roadshow, and author of The Family Tree Toolkit is joined by Jen Baldwin, the North American Content Manager and Global Ambassador Program Lead for Findmypast. The two dive into a myriad of topics, discussing Irish and British ancestry, how the Spanish Flu affected records, and how to use FindmyPast in your research - including big news on their latest collection - the 1921 census.  Join FindMyPast here: www.findmypast.comFind out more about the 1921 Census: https://www.findmypast.com/1921-censusUse their free records here: https://www.findmypast.com/page/free-ancestry-recordsABOUT JEN BALDWINJen Baldwin has been working in the realm of professional genealogy since 2010 but has been pursuing her family history since she was ten years old, enjoying her grandmother's stories - and her cookies. She is currently the North American Content Manager and Global Ambassador Program Lead for Findmypast. Jen lectures, writes, and consults on a variety of genealogy related topics, and was part of the research team for Genealogy Roadshow, season two on PBS. She is the author of course materials for the National Institute of Genealogical Studies. She is excited to discover unique resources that allow for a different perspective in genealogical research, including the vast research opportunities for family historians around the world to take advantage of UK collections, such as newspapers and the upcoming 1921 Census of England and Wales.
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