DiscoverLibraries Lead!
Libraries Lead!
Claim Ownership

Libraries Lead!

Author: Beth Patin, Dave Lankes, & Mike Eisenberg

Subscribed: 3Played: 2
Share

Description

Libraries Lead! is a provocative podcast about all things information & library hosted by Beth Patin (Assistant Professor, School of Information Studies, Syracuse U), Dave Lankes (Professor, iSchool, U of Texas), and Mike Eisenberg (Dean/Professor Emeritus, iSchool, U of Washington). Information age opportunities and challenges affect every aspect of human existence. We wrestle with such topics as social justice, political unrest, mis- and dis-information, kids, family and adult living; education and learning; work, employment, training and jobs; recreation, entertainment, and play; disasters & emergency preparedness with a focus on libraries & information science, services, and systems. 3 segments in approx. 1 hour: WAZZUP, MAIN TOPIC, and AWESOME LIBRARY THINGY.
21 Episodes
Reverse
Meltdown at Twitter? Advertisers leaving, Apple may delist the Twitter app, many have canceled their Twitter accounts.  What does this mean? Is there something more meaningful, valuable, and humane to replace it -perhaps a trustworthy, digital platform for the exchange of information and ideas moderated for credibility and trust? Should librarians seek to shape or support a Twitter replacement?  What's a reasonable stance for librarians in the face of free speech versus responsible speech? Let’s talk.For References & Resources  Visit us atwww.acechicagoevents.com/libraries-lead-episode-20For References & Resources  of all Episodes Visit us atwww.librarieslead.com 
Episode 19: WHAT?????February 21st. 2022Beth Patin, Dave Lankes, & Mike EisenbergWhat is going on in this world? Librarians in the crosshairs! Book censorship and actual book burnings! Heavy-handed government control of schools, curriculum, higher education, libraries! Handmaid’s Tale-like nightmare in terms of women’s rights! Climate catastrophes! War in Ukraine. Strife - hatred - violence! WTF?????For References & Resources  Visit us atwww.acechicagoevents.com/libraries-lead-episode-19For References & Resources  of all Episodes Visit us atwww.librarieslead.com 
Episode 18: The Censors are Coming! The Censors are Coming!February 21st. 2022Beth Patin, Dave Lankes, & Mike EisenbergIt is happening here. Again. There’s a huge increase in efforts to censor what is taught or even discussed in school along with banning, and in some cases even burning books in schools and libraries. In this episode, we delve into the nature of these threats along with ways to counteract them. The same people who profess to champion freedom and rail against cancel culture, wokeness, safe places, and hurt feelings now want to censor and ban books, pass laws against teaching about race or sexuality, and “protect” kids and ourselves from ideas, science, or history that might be upsetting. What is this all about, and what are the implications, particularly for libraries and schools? For References & Resources  Visit us atwww.acechicagoevents.com/libraries-lead-episode-18For References & Resources  of all Episodes Visit us atwww.librarieslead.com 
Episode 17: Video Sharing & So Much MoreFebruary 1st, 2022Beth Patin, Dave Lankes, & Mike EisenbergYouTube has more than 2 billion active users collectively viewing over 5 billion videos totaling a combined 1 billion hours of video viewing every day!! Tik Tok is the new kid on the block, just 4 years old worldwide, and already with over 1 billion active users watching 167 million videos every minute! These two entities wield tremendous influence across every demographic. Clearly more than benign video sharing platforms, they are mass media publishers, social media exchanges, and content creation streaming services. What’s the scoop? Are they valuable and helpful services or is there a darker side? Let’s find out.For References & Resources  Visit us atwww.acechicagoevents.com/libraries-lead-episode-17For References & Resources  of all Episodes Visit us atwww.librarieslead.com 
Episode 16: FACEBOOK: The Good, Bad, and the UglyJanuary 18th, 2022Beth Patin, Dave Lankes, & Mike EisenbergThis episode continues our conversation about social media. We zero in on the 800 lb gorilla – make that the 1.6 BILLION LB gorilla that dominates social media,  FACEBOOK. That’s 1.6 billion because over 1.6 BILLION people (on average) visit Facebook every day. Listen in as we unravel this information age phenomenon.For References & Resources  Visit us atwww.acechicagoevents.com/libraries-lead-episode-16For References & Resources  of all Episodes Visit us atwww.librarieslead.com 
Episode 15: Life, the Universe and Everything Social Media. December 21st, 2021Beth Patin, Dave Lankes, & Mike EisenbergThis is the first of a series of episodes about the phenomenon of social media. Social media dominates and affects almost all aspect of life and society, sometimes purposefully and often not. In the series, we hope to inform as well as identify some recommended good practices, and to discuss how libraries can and are helping people to engage effectively and safely. Here in episode 15 we will take a broad view of social media highlighting some of the nuts and bolts, the “why” of social media, and to begin to discuss the impact and issues.
Episode 14: Info Literacy - Now More Than Ever!November 17th, 2021Beth Patin, Dave Lankes, & Mike EisenbergInformation literacy relates to every aspect of human existence – individually or in communities. Almost all human activities and endeavors are information-based, especially in our turbocharged, networked, overloaded info world. In this episode, we explore a range of info literacy issues including information skills, relevance, credibility, mis- and dis-information, bias, technology, media, and equity. For References & Resources  Visit us atwww.acechicagoevents.com/libraries-lead-episode-14For References & Resources  of all Episodes Visit us atwww.librarieslead.com 
Episode 13: Politics R Us?November 13th, 2021Beth Patin, Dave Lankes, & Mike EisenbergAughhh! The po·lit·i·ci·za·tion of everything! We don’t seem to be able to escape increasing polarization and the division into rival groups identified by politics and worldviews as well as the demonization of the other side.  Is this the new normal? Even for libraries and public service? Is everything to be defined or viewed through a political lens? through a political identity?   What is the politicization of everything - its nature and scope - and what are the implications? For References & Resources  Visit us atwww.acechicagoevents.com/libraries-lead-episode-13For References & Resources  of all Episodes Visit us atwww.librarieslead.com 
Episode 12: Truth or Dare: A New Normal in Education and Human Services?October 13, 2021Beth Patin, Dave Lankes, & Mike EisenbergStarting this, our second season, we have a huge change to the Libraries Lead podcast. In the last episode (#11) of the first season, Beth Patin, assistant professor at the Syracuse University iSchool joined us. She was fantastic, mind blowing, amazing. The conversation was electric; It sizzled. Beth added so much that it was clear that she needed to be part of every episode. And here she is—a permanent tri-host of the podcast. In this episode, we question the reality and nature of an emerging new normal in education on all levels as well as in other human services workplaces such as healthcare, medicine, and libraries.For References & Resources  Visit us atwww.acechicagoevents.com/libraries-lead-episode-12For References & Resources  of all Episodes Visit us atwww.librarieslead.com 
Episode 11: Emergency! Being Prepared in the New Normal. October 1, 2021Beth Patin, Dave Lankes & Mike EisenbergUnfortunately, the dire future predictions of crises due to environment and climate change, disease, poverty, and social justice are today’s realities. This new normal requires communities, individuals, and governments to cope right now while also looking ahead to plan for and create the necessary infrastructure and processes (conceptually and physically) to deal with future emergency situations. Starting this, our second season, we have a huge change to the Libraries Lead podcast. In the last episode (#11) of the first season, Beth Patin, assistant professor at the Syracuse University iSchool joined us. She was fantastic, mind blowing, amazing. The conversation was electric; It sizzled. Beth added so much that it was clear that she needed to be part of every episode. And here she is—a permanent tri-host of the podcast. In this episode, we question the reality and nature of an emerging new normal in education on all levels as well as in other human services workplaces such as healthcare, medicine, and libraries. Listen in to a frank and sometimes scary conversation relevant to everyday people just trying to get by, government and public service officials responsible for dealing with crises, and of course, library & information staff and institutions who provide essential in services and resources.For References & Resources  Visit us atwww.acechicagoevents.com/libraries-lead-episode-11For References & Resources  of all Episodes Visit us atwww.librarieslead.com 
Episode 10: Data to the Rescue?  July 1, 2021  Dave Lankes & Mike Eisenberg We agree on something “data to protect you" is an oxymoron. Data can be dangerous–particularly in the hands of corporations, governments, hackers, scammers, & even well-intentioned non-profits, public service providers, and even libraries and librarians. Public libraries monitor patrons on social media to market services to better “meet needs.” School libraries create student Google profiles and capture user data. Academic libraries seek to address mental health issues identified through analysis of user data. We understand the well-meaning intentions to help. But do we really want anyone to be able to collect and aggregate all this data about anyone & everyone? To make sense of the whole “data” thing, we are joined by Megan Oakleaf, Associate Professor, Syracuse University iSchool. Megan researches & teaches library value/impact, outcomes assessment, learning analytics, evidence-based decision making, information literacy instruction, and information services.  She is also Director of Online Engagement. Learn with us about data use and misuse. For References & Resources  Visit us at www.acechicagoevents.com/libraries-lead-episode-10  For References & Resources  of all Episoeds Visit us atwww.librarieslead.com 
June 2, 2021Dave Lankes & Mike EisenbergAre we going back to offices and city living or will a new normal emerge? Judging from the articles and posts, it’s not clear at all. That means it’s likely to be a combination of both depending on contexts of nature of activity (e.g., business), geography, and the economics (jobs, commerce, supply chain). With uncertainty prevailing, what should libraries be thinking about and planning for? As an added bonus, our production manager, Yoni Yemini, from ACE Chicago Events joins us to share his thoughts on how things are changing for his business. In Wazzup, Dave talks about the challenges to libraries, communities, and library & info science education due to the continually changing Covid situation. Mike points out the information aspects of vaccination verification with examples from the EU and New York State.  Dave’s Awesome Library Thingy was the Next Library Festival that was held on June 3rd, 2021, and Mike highlighted a NY Times article about museums post-covid, particularly the opportunities for new forms of programming and partnering.References & Resources WazzupStevis-Gridneff, Matina. (June 1, 2021). "Seven European countries begin issuing a digital Covid certificate for travel." New York Times. online. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/01/world/europe-covid-certificate-travel.html Otterman, Sharon (June 1, 2021). "Will the Excelsior Pass, New York’s Vaccine Passport, Catch On?" New York Times online: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/01/nyregion/new-york-vaccine-passport.html. Main Topic: Back to the FutureMahtani, Melissa (May 30, 2021). “Don't just go back to 'normal.' Post-pandemic life can be much better than that.” CNN Health. https://www.cnn.com/2021/05/30/health/better-than-normal-wellness/index.html.Tracy Moore, Tracy. (May 21, 2021) “I don’t want to go back to the office and I’m not alone.” Washington Post online. https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/05/21/i-dont-want-go-back-office-im-not-alone/.Dubner, Stephen J. (May 12, 2021). “The Future of New York City Is in Question. Could Andrew Yang Be the Answer?” Freakonomics podcast (Ep. 462). https://freakonomics.com/podcast/yang-mayor/   Awesome Library Thingy‘Next’ Library Festival (June 3, 2021) http://www.nextlibrary.net/page/next-library-festival-2021 Farago, Jason (May 21, 2021). "10 Ways for Museums to Survive and Thrive in a Post-Covid World." New York Times, updated online May 24, 2021 https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/21/arts/pandemic-museums-ideas.html.  CreditsAudio, Production, and Streaming Services: Yoni Yemini, ACE Chicago Events
May 26, 2021 Dave Lankes & Mike Eisenberg In the last episode, Mike ranted about his frustrations and hours spent in trying to reach a human being for assistance with airline reservations, prescriptions, and insurance. In this episode, we dive deeper into the topic of help and information services of all kinds– human, mediated (telephone, digital), online. What’s going on with consumer help and what’s the status of Q&A, Ask a Librarian, and reference services in library land?In Wazzup, Dave describes the master class in the new librarianship he’s part of with the National Library School of France, and Mike shares concerns stemming from a disturbing text from a friend related to vaccines loaded with mis- and dis-information that raised all kinds of issues about the credibility of information and the undermining of quality of information. Dave’s Awesome Library Thingy spotlights the Toronto Public Library and Pam Ryan, Director, Service Development & Innovation, and their cutting-edge information literacy classes in machine learning, algorithms, public data, AI, and more.References & Resources École Nationale Supérieure des Sciences de l’Information et des Bibliothèques: the national library school of France., https://www.enssib.fr/ Angela Craig interview (May 12, 2021), Libraries Lead in the New Normal, Podcast Episode 7. https://www.acechicagoevents.com/libraries-lead-episode-7 Ewen, Lara (May 3, 2021). “Healthy Distance, Telemedicine brings house calls to local libraries,” American Libraries. p. 14. online: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/2021/05/03/healthy-distance-libraries-telemedicine/ Radford, M., Costello, L., & Montague, K. (2021). Surging virtual reference services: COVID-19 a game-changer. College & Research Libraries News, 82(3), 106. doi: https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.3.106   Toronto Public Library https://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/ Digital Innovation Series, Toronto Public Library https://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/search.jsp?N=37867+4288098632 CreditsAudio, Production, and Streaming Services: Yoni Yemini, ACE Chicago Events
May 12, 2021 Dave Lankes & Mike Eisenberg 74 minutes Mike and Dave are joined by a very special guest – the talented and enthusiastic Angela Craig, Executive Director, Charleston County Public Library. Charleston County is a cutting-edge regional library system. In addition to offering all that we expect from public libraries, Charleston has been particularly responsive to the challenges of helping people and communities due to emergencies such as Hurricane and of course, the Covid-19 pandemic. Angela explains the nature and scope of needs that emerged and the full-scale reaction by librarians and staff in terms of outreach, services, systems, and partnerships that were quickly deployed. We know that you will be as impressed as we are to learn about specific programs (e.g., vaccine clinics, telehealth connections, mobile hotspots and Wi-Fi, refrigerated community garden produce) and their close coordination with the regional emergency services department.On the wazzup front, Dave announces that he’s taking a new, highly visible and prestigious job at the University of Texas in order to continue his passion of championing libraries, librarians, and making a difference in society. Mike rants about the deterioration of telephone and web-based customer service across all kinds of situations and domains.References & Resources Angela Craig: https://www.ccpl.org/team/angela-craigCharleston County Public Library: https://www.ccpl.org/Daniel Markovits, Daniel (May 6, 2021). “How College Became a Ruthless Competition Divorced From Learning,” The Atlantic. https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/05/marriage-college-status-meritocracy/618795/ CreditsAudio, Production, and Streaming Services: Yoni Yemini, ACE Chicago Events
April 19, 2021Dave Lankes & Mike Eisenberg44 minutesAs we start to see some light at the end of the pandemic tunnel, what does it mean for the locus and nature of work? Will everyone simply return to their offices, businesses, and schools as if nothing has changed? Or has the lockdown been a catalyst for reconsidering location, work-home balance, and the trade-offs of physical vs. virtual work. And, what about the accompanying effects on the environment, transportation (commuting and traffic), health (physical and mental), and social interaction. Is hybrid – blended physical and virtual – the new normal?Also, what would this mean for libraries and librarians? As the information infrastructure and services providers of communities, are there new, more permanent needs and demands to meet for businesses, workers, parents, and students? And, what about the library workforce? Will librarians and support staff also work in hybrid formats?This main topic discussion is bolstered by two “awesome library thingys” Dave highlights the American Library Association’s 2021 State of America’s Libraries Report which (among many things) describes librarians as second responders, but more importantly as “first restorers.” Mike builds on a previous highlight about open access reflected the new resources use agreement between the University of California system and Elsevier.References & ResourcesMegan Oakleaf 2021: Library Recognition Award, Library Instruction Round Table (LIRT) https://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2021/04/dr-megan-oakleaf-chosen-2021-recipient-lirt-librarian-recognition-award Jefferson, Jr., Julius C. (04/05/21 01:30 PM EDT). “From steel to fiber, libraries are American infrastructure.” The Hill. https://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/politics/546492-from-steel-to-fiber-libraries-are-american-infrastructureSpiggle, Tom (Feb 17, 2021) “The Post-Coronavirus Workplace: What The ‘New Normal’ May Look Like,” Forbes. https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomspiggle/2021/02/17/the-post-coronavirus-workplace-what-the-new-normal-may-look-like/?sh=1df61b1638daSamuel, Alexandra (March 21, 2021). “How to Manage the New Hybrid Workplace,” The Wall Street Journal, https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-to-manage-the-new-hybrid-workplace-11616328000 American Library Association. The State of America’s Libraries 2021: A Report from the American Library Association. Steve Zalusky. https://bit.ly/soal-report-2021.Office of Scholarly Communication, University of California (March 16, 2021). “UC secures landmark open access deal with world’s largest scientific publisher.”  https://osc.universityofcalifornia.edu/2021/03/uc-secures-landmark-oa-deal-with-worlds-largest-scientific-publisher/Office of Scholarly Communication, University of California (April 2021). “Elsevier Transformative Open Access Agreement.” https://osc.universityofcalifornia.edu/uc-publisher-relationships/elsevier-oa-agreement/CreditsYoni Yemini from ACE Chicago Events
March 17, 2021 45 Minutes Dave Lankes & Mike Eisenberg In this episode, Mike and Dave start with a brief exchange on the changing nature of work and the need to help low-wage earners find out about high demand jobs, requirements, and opportunities for getting access to quality training. Mike & Dave then pick up the conversation about education in the evolving new normal from episode 3’s insights from Colet Bartow, Teaching and Learning Senior Manager in the Montana Office of Public Instruction. Colet raised such issues as the increased interest in homeschooling or perhaps moving to a blended or hybrid approach to schooling, as well as the continued challenges of the digital divide. Mike laments that education is still stuck in a “19th Century, industrial model of mass-production education with cookie-cutter classrooms, fixed schedules, bells, and a one-size-fits-all curriculum. Do we really want to go back to this “old normal”? Dave sees a need to experiment, learn more about, and share best practices on how to use the emerging online technologies more effectively with libraries and librarians deeply involved.Also highlighted (as an Awesome Library Thingy) is Barbara Fister’s essay (from Project Information Literacy) that was picked up by The Atlantic about librarians confronting the mis- and dis-information efforts of Q-Anon and other conspiracy theory promoters by expanding exposure to skills and knowledge concerning social media, inquiry, and how this whole “information thing” works.References & Resources Miller, Elizabeth. (March 1, 20215:00 AM ET) "For Some Black Students, Remote Learning Has Offered A Chance To Thrive,"  National Public Radio: All Things Considered.  https://www.npr.org/2021/03/01/963282430/for-some-black-students-remote-learning-has-offered-a-chance-to-thrive Fister, Barbara (Feb 18, 2021) “The Librarian War Against Qanon.  As “Do the research” becomes a rallying cry for conspiracy theorists, classical information literacy is not enough. The Atlantic https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2021/02/how-librarians-can-fight-qanon/618047/  Fister, Barbara (Feb 3, 2021) “Lizard People in the Library,” Project Information Literacy, Provocation Series.  https://projectinfolit.org/pubs/provocation-series/essays/lizard-people-in-the-library.htmlCreditsYoni Yemini from ACE Chicago Events
March 17, 2021 45 Minutes Dave Lankes & Mike Eisenberg In this episode, Mike and Dave start with a brief exchange on the changing nature of work and the need to help low-wage earners find out about high demand jobs, requirements, and opportunities for getting access to quality training. Mike & Dave then pick up the conversation about education in the evolving new normal from episode 3’s insights from Colet Bartow, Teaching and Learning Senior Manager in the Montana Office of Public Instruction. Colet raised such issues as the increased interest in homeschooling or perhaps moving to a blended or hybrid approach to schooling, as well as the continued challenges of the digital divide. Mike laments that education is still stuck in a “19th Century, industrial model of mass-production education with cookie-cutter classrooms, fixed schedules, bells, and a one-size fits all curriculum. Do we really want to go back to this “old normal”? Dave sees a need to experiment, learn more about, and share best practices on how to use the emerging online technologies more effectively with libraries and librarians deeply involved.Also highlighted (as an Awesome Library Thingy) is Barbara Fister’s essay (from Project Information Literacy) that was picked up by The Atlantic about librarians confronting the mis- and dis-information efforts of Q-Anon and other conspiracy theory promoters by expanding exposure to skills and knowledge concerning social media, inquiry, and how this whole “information thing” works.References & Resources Miller, Elizabeth. (March 1, 20215:00 AM ET) "For Some Black Students, Remote Learning Has Offered A Chance To Thrive,"  National Public Radio: All Things Considered.  https://www.npr.org/2021/03/01/963282430/for-some-black-students-remote-learning-has-offered-a-chance-to-thrive Fister, Barbara (Feb 18, 2021) “The Librarian War Against Qanon.  As “Do the research” becomes a rallying cry for conspiracy theorists, classical information literacy is not enough. The Atlantic https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2021/02/how-librarians-can-fight-qanon/618047/  Fister, Barbara (Feb 3, 2021) “Lizard People in the Library,” Project Information Literacy, Provocation Series.  https://projectinfolit.org/pubs/provocation-series/essays/lizard-people-in-the-library.htmlCreditsYoni Yemini from ACE Chicago Events
March 3, 2021 75 Minutes Dave Lankes & Mike Eisenberg It pretty much happened overnight: schools are closed, kids are home, teaching and learning are online, parents are responsible for coordinating it all. While every aspect of life has been affected by the pandemic, no sector has been more quickly and more significantly by the pandemic than education – on all levels. The most direct impact is on students, parents, and teachers, but it really affects everyone.  In this episode, we try to get a handle on what’s going on and what it means—immediate, short-, and long-term. We do so by speaking with someone who has perspectives on the details but also the big picture, pre-K to 12 and beyond: Colet Bartow, Teaching and Learning Senior Manager, Montana Office of Public Instruction. Colet is an accomplished teacher, education & technology innovator, and advocate for libraries, information technology, curriculum improvement, and information literacy in learning and teaching. Listen in on this far-reaching discussion of the challenges and opportunities in our new normal world.References & Resources Wazzup?Weber, Paul J.; Stengle, Jamie (March 26, 2021). "Texas death toll from February storm, outages surpasses 100". 2021 Texas power crisis. Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2021_Texas_power_crisis Accessed May 1, 2021.Main Topic - EducationMontana Office of Public Instruction. http://opi.mt.gov/ The Big6 Approach to Information & Technology Literacy. https://thebig6.org/ Sullivan-Macdonald, Donna (Oct 02, 2015). “Teach More, Librarian Less, Say SLJ Leadership Summit Panelists,” School Library Journal. https://www.slj.com/?detailStory=teach-more-librarian-less-becoming-essential-panel-at-the-slj-leadership-summit Awesome Library ThingysFay, Brigham (Feb 10, 2021). “MIT Libraries develop innovative open access agreements with PLOS. All MIT authors can publish in PLOS journals without publishing fees,” MIT Libraries News & Events. https://libraries.mit.edu/news/libraries-develop/31742/ Shannon McClintock Miller: Innovation Director of Instructional Technology and Library Media at Van Meter Community School in Van Meter, Iowa. https://vanmeterlibraryvoice.blogspot.com/p/about-me.html Burt, Chris. (November 17, 2020). “Librarians leading the way with innovation, support during COVID.” Shannon McClintock Miller shares how this empowered group of school leaders is making a difference with students and teachers, along with some of the tools they are using. https://districtadministration.com/librarians-lead-the-way-with-innovation-guidance-during-covid/ Future Ready Librarians. https://futureready.org/thenetwork/strands/future-ready-librarians/ CreditsYoni Yemini from ACE Chicago Events
February 3, 2021 57 minutesDave Lankes & Mike EisenbergIn this second episode (and our last simultaneous broadcast as part of the Publishers Weekly Skillset Podcast), Mike is all upset about how difficult it was to get an appointment for a Covid vaccine. “This should be a very manageable information problem! Why can’t we set up an easy system for everyone and anyone – using people, databases, systems, and the telephone?”  Dave agrees and explains how libraries can support the rollout along with more long-term emergency support services and resources. And, as in every episode, they share “wazzup” and interesting bits from recent library news.58 minutesReferences & Resources Kerlinger, F. (1986). Foundations of behavioral research (3rd ed.). New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.Institute for Museum and Library Services, US Federal Government. https://www.imls.gov/Slijkerman, D., & Vlimmeren, T. . (2021). Living libraries: The house of the community around the world.[A collection of essays on the changing role of public libraries in society.] available free online: https://www.bibliotheekutrecht.nl/living-libraries.html DeForge, Jeanette (Updated Jan 29, 2021; Posted Jan 28, 2021) "Springfield librarians, elder affairs workers will help residents register online for COVID vaccines." Mass Live. https://www.masslive.com/news/2021/01/springfield-librarians-elder-affairs-workers-will-assist-residents-in-registering-online-for-covid-vaccines.html Staeger, Steve (February 1, 2021). "The ‘vaccine whisperer’ helps find appointments for seniors." 9 News, Colorado. https://www.9news.com/article/news/local/next/vaccine-whisperer-covid-coronavirus-appointments/73-807a2efd-f20c-4a86-a826-48dd176cf593 CreditsYoni Yemini from ACE Chicago Events
January 20, 2021 109 minutesDave Lankes & Mike EisenbergThis is the first episode of our new podcast - Libraries Lead in the New Normal. We aim for a wild conversation between two close friends who share a passion for all things library & information but frequently disagree on specifics. This episode which was recorded in January 2021 and simultaneously broadcast at that time as part of the Publishers Weekly Skillset Podcast. We originally intended to talk about the pandemic and the emerging new normal. But, the January 6 insurrection and the Biden inauguration took precedent. Dave was particularly moved and wrote a passionate essay that appeared in Publishers Weekly on how libraries and librarians must do more than be repositories of knowledge or passive providers of information services. We must be players in securing a more perfect union through active engagement in civic and educational discourse and building and providing equitable and accessible information systems and institutions.This episode also includes 2 special segments: “Wazzup” lately and “Awesome Library Thingy” to highlight some amazing libraries and librarians. These segments will be regular features of all episodes.References & ResourcesLankes, R. D (Jan 22, 2011). “How Libraries Can Help Us Make a More Perfect Union,” Publishers Weekly Online. https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/columns-and-blogs/soapbox/article/85366-can-libraries-make-for-a-more-perfect-union.html  Bowles, Nellie (Jan. 14, 2021, Updated Jan. 17, 2021).  “They Can’t Leave the Bay Area Fast Enough,” New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/14/technology/san-francisco-covid-work-moving.html CreditsYoni Yemini from ACE Chicago Events
loading
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store