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Incontinence is a serious matter for those who have to deal with it on a daily basis. Many sufferers seek out absorbent hygiene products to cope with their condition. And for most consumers, how their needs (leak protection, discretion, affordability, etc.) are met can make or break their trust in a brand forever. So how can producers better serve the consumer? One simple approach is to talk to product users. In this episode of ‘Attached to Hygiene’, host Jack Hughes and guest moderator Alan Cottenden speak with a user panel from Europe. As Emeritus Professor of Incontinence Technology at University College London, Alan has extensive expertise with Incontinence products and user experience. Panellists Tonneke, Chris, and Rebecca share how current market products meet their needs and what more they wish for from the market as they manage their incontinence.The many challenges of living with incontinenceIncontinence affects an individual's daily life on many levels and to differing degrees. To live as normally as possible, incontinent adults rely on their absorbent product's effectiveness in several categories: absorption, odour control, and more. As we talk to our panel of users in this episode, we get to hear about their candid experiences with how incontinence limits and impacts their lives … altering what activities they do … the clothes they choose to wear … how they plan their day. We also learn what products work—or almost work—for them as they manage their condition. Whilst the panellists recognise the improvements made in the industry over the last several years, each has a wish list that would make living with incontinence just a little bit easier.Outline of the Episode[01:00] Incontinence is a sensitive problem with many aspects[05:54] Understanding user experience helps you address their concerns[13:05] Incontinence of any type can limit options or make living a full life difficult[17:41] Secrecy, discretion, and the reactions of others to incontinence[24:00] The panellists’ experiences … Do current products meet their needs?[30:25] Skin health and managing issues caused by incontinence[34:25] Changes that would improve user experience with incontinence products[41:06] Why consumers may mix and match various product types [46:05] Users want more sustainable products, but they can’t sacrifice performance or afford expensive solutions[51:02] The impact of a product’s appearance on discretion and attitude ResourcesYou can find Alan on LinkedIn. You may wish to leave him a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com. If you'd like to donate to any of the preferred charities of our panellists, you can do so via the links below.Bladder Health UKBekkenbodem4allThe Simon Foundation for ContinenceProgress Educational TrustFor additional information, download our 1-page PDFs, ‘Fit is Key to Comfort and Performance in Adult Incontinence’ and ‘Core Performance in Adult Incontinence’. Or, request a copy of our complete ‘Adult Incontinence’ whitepaper.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneTake our Listener Survey to receive an early copy of our CSR Whitepaper.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
The absorbent hygiene market varies by region, and each has its own history, cultures, customs, and languages. However, there are distinctions between and even within countries. As an article producer, you need to keep these factors in mind when it comes to consumer preferences and expectations. In this episode of ‘Attached to Hygiene’, Rockey Ye, Business Director for Bostik's Asia-Pacific (APAC) region, and Tina Li, Bostik's Strategic Market and Technical Service Manager, share their knowledge of absorbent hygiene in the APAC region. Topics include market size, growth potential, demographics, user habits, and the influence of local and international brands.The Impact of Culture, Demographics, Income, and More on Consumer Buying HabitsEven within the same region, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to meeting your consumer’s needs. For example, some consider the menstrual health market in APAC to be the most diversified of all the world’s regions. This plays a significant role in what types of articles are produced. In some APAC countries, individuals who menstruate prefer a thicker, longer-lasting pad. In other countries within this region, users want a product with additives that help keep them cooler in a warm climate.In certain areas of the industry, product supply is outpacing demand. Because of this, commoditisation is occurring in the low- and mid-tier levels of absorbent articles. Conversely, innovation is shaping higher-end products. Families, especially those with greater disposable incomes, are having fewer children. As a result, fewer baby diapers are produced and when they are, the products include more premium features. This lower birth rate, coupled with an aging population, is leading some manufacturers to shift their focus. Especially notable are growth opportunities in adult incontinence and period care. While local brands are entering the absorbent hygiene market, the global and regional brands continue to dominate. As a manufacturer who serves the APAC region, you can benefit from understanding these and other evolving dynamics and trends.Outline of the Episode[05:10] Introduction of Rockey Ye and Tina Li[07:53] The APAC region’s market size and growth potential[13:10] How APAC differs from other regions, based on demographics and other factors[14:29] Higher income and its connection to a declining birth rate[17:22] The effect of Asia's diverse cultures on user habits [20:02] More disposable income means a higher demand for premium products[24:15] Material science innovation in absorbent hygiene[28:45] Divergent trends: Low-end commoditisation and high-end innovation[31:51] Consolidation in the manufacturing market[34:08] An e-commerce report on the company BabyCare[35:30] Global and regional brands still dominant in APACResourcesYou can find Tina Li on LinkedIn. You may wish to leave her or Rockey a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com. Listen to our episode on absorbent hygiene market trends:Hygiene Market Trends and InsightsListen to both parts of our episodes on the EMEA market which includes Europe, the Middle East, and Africa:The EMEA Market Part 1The EMEA Market Part 2Read our article on how industry innovations are meeting the top five consumer needs in absorbent hygiene.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneTake our Listener Survey to receive an early copy of our CSR Whitepaper.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
Concerns around sustainability. A more educated consumer base. Challenges of a pandemic! No doubt the absorbent hygiene market is evolving. In this episode of ‘Attached to Hygiene’, Natalia Richer, Global AHP Consultant at Diaper Testing International, and Heidi Beatty, Crown Abbey CEO, share their insights on trends in absorbent hygiene:What is happening now?What is being explored?What is in store for the industry in the next three to five years?Convenience, Sustainability, and New Technologies Propel the IndustryThe absorbent hygiene industry, like many others, has been experiencing delays and shortages due to the pandemic. As a result, manufacturers across the globe are being forced to adjust supply chains. Others are having to make unexpected decisions, such as how to allocate their limited packaging materials. Even so, innovation continues: Diapers with channel cores have now been released by several manufacturers. Pant diapers are gaining market share in multiple regions and for different age groups. Reusable period panties are also growing in popularity. Some consumers, though, find the idea of a washable absorbent product to be confusing.At the same time, technological advancements are adding new functionality to products. For example, hospitals in Europe are adopting specially designed diapers that offer remote data collection. Another avenue being explored is based on the fact that bodily fluids carry valuable information about the user’s health. What if absorbent hygiene products could also screen for certain indicators in urine or blood? Then they could flag possible health issues and notify users so they can take action sooner. Innovations such as these could bring entirely new benefits to the absorbent hygiene products of the future. Outline of the Episode[04:54] How the pandemic affects the absorbent hygiene market[08:43] The most educated generation of mothers in history are expecting greener, cleaner, and more transparent products[10:37] Smarter products enable convenience and new types of data tracking[17:51] Some advanced potentials for absorbent hygiene products[22:45] A closer look at channel cores and reusable period products[28:21] How TESCO is working to help consumers be more sustainable[31:34] The Latin-American mindset and opportunities for market growth[35:06] The more eco-conscious you are, the more involved you can be in your purchases[39:21] Are compostable products bringing any nutritional value back to the soil?[43:47] Predictions for the absorbent hygiene market in the next five yearsResourcesYou can find Natalia Richer and Heidi Beatty on LinkedIn or leave them a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com. You can also connect with this episode's moderator, Diane Toonen on LinkedIn.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneTake our Listener Survey to receive an early copy of our CSR Whitepaper.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
This episode is sponsored by Cotton Incorporated and their B2B focused website, CottonWorks.New products enter the market every day, and their creators hope they are successful. However, sometimes products flounder or fail. There are many reasons: Assumptions about consumer expectations or preferences were wrong. The consumer’s needs change by the time the product reaches the market. The product may be priced too high or too low. That’s why it’s crucial for manufacturers to incorporate consumer feedback from inception to launch. But how is this done? In this episode of ‘Attached to Hygiene’, Amrita Saigal, CEO of Kudos, explores this question and others with host Jack Hughes. The Power of Connecting With Your Consumer BaseThe original concept of Kudos’ diapers was to offer parents a more natural alternative for their babies. Next, the idea was refined based on conversations with the consumers the company hoped to serve. Since 90% of babies are born to Millennials, they were the obvious market. The team also researched who made the purchasing decisions and discovered it’s overwhelmingly the mother. Based on their findings, the company created a profile of their typical consumer, whom they call Natural Nikki. They let their future consumer base test prototypes and offer input. Most importantly, they listened to that feedback and implemented changes. Because of this approach, by the time Kudos officially launched, there was already a level of trust established. The company had a built-in base of consumers who were invested in the brand.One thing that Amrita considers important is transparency. Let the consumers know what you’ve done for them and be honest about the challenges. For example, Kudos diapers are natural everywhere that touches the baby, but there are plastics in other areas of the product. Why? The market doesn’t have affordable alternatives yet. When demand goes up, new processes will emerge. Eventually, the prices for more sustainable alternatives will come down. Knowing their consumer’s thoughts on price, quality, and sustainability helps Kudos to find the right balance to meet today’s needs and plan for the future of the market.Outline of the Episode[04:53] The amount of plastic put into absorbent consumer products[06:49] What parents are concerned about in their baby's diapers[08:04] What do eco-friendly diapers mean by eco-friendly?[13:36] What does the Millennial mom look for from diapers?[16:01] Statistics on Millennial parents[21:03] Millennial moms struggle for balance in many areas[27:17] Why Natural Nikki chooses Kudos diapers[32:07] When will the world make sustainability mainstream?[36:00] Including the consumers in your product's journey gains their trust[41:15] Amrita on building a tight-knit customer baseResourcesYou can find Amrita Saigal on LinkedIn or leave her a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com.Learn more about Kudos by visiting their website. Get Connected with Attached to HygieneTake our Listener Survey to receive an early copy of our CSR Whitepaper.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.If you’d like to see the results of the Clinical Study from Cotton Incorporated, you can do so on their B2B focused website, CottonWorks.
Individuals who menstruate have full lives, and their product of choice has to keep up with the demands of their lifestyle. A pad that isn't sticking is the last thing they want to worry about. In this episode of ‘Attached to Hygiene’, experts Jill Scheu, Chemist and Group Leader, and Luke Burkholder, Technical Account Manager, explore the number one issue that most menstrual health product users have with pads: stay-in-place performance. Consumer feedback is clear. About half of product users reported experiencing stay-in-place performance issues 50% of the time. If current methods are not meeting consumer expectations, then it’s time for a different approach to how pads are being tested for the market.Stay-in-place performance is a complex issue in menstrual healthDisposable pads are just one of the many products that users consider 'essential' when it comes to managing their period. According to Jill, once they find something that works for them, they typically don't change brands—even if that article falls below their standards. It’s also why manufacturers may be cautious about making changes to their products and methods. Producers are concerned about losing that loyalty. And so, the stay-in-place problem persists.Jill and Luke have been studying what pad users need from the attachment adhesive. One question they asked was why the industry standard—peel testing—wasn’t accurately predicting user experience. Next, they considered what variables are involved in meeting the consumer’s expectations. And lastly, how can the industry test for the stay-in-place performance users really want? Their answer was to create an entirely new procedure, Bostik’s patent-pending Staybility™ test method.Outline of the Episode[05:55] Normalising the discussion of pads, underwear, and the menstrual cycle[08:57] The diversity of consumers and menstrual health products[10:32] User loyalty and the risk of changing products[15:40] Menstrual pads should meet expectations, with the fewest limits possible[20:10] Underwear fabrics, treatments, knits, and more can affect staying power[26:11] Valid testing starts with standard materials, then explores variables[32:00] The flexibility of Staybility™ test method for evaluating many factors[36:57] The entire pad’s construction impacts its stay-in-place performance[40:14] How can a pad attachment adhesive meet consumer expectations?[42:47] Partnering with producers to better understand consumer experienceResourcesYou can find Luke Burkholder on LinkedIn or leave Jill or Luke a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com.Want to see how your pad’s performance stands up? Click on our request form, select Service and Support, and mention Staybility™ Testing in the space provided.Take our Listener Survey to receive an early copy of our CSR Whitepaper.Watch our Webinar on Stay in Place and Staybility.Download our Whitepaper, ‘Fabrics, Undergarments, and the Pad Attachment Adhesive’Download our Whitepaper, ‘Next Level Stay-in-Place Testing, and Adhesive Technologies’Get Connected with Attached to HygieneConnect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
Take our listener survey to receive our new CSR Whitepaper.Two U.S. states have already enacted laws requiring disposable hygiene packaging to list ingredients. Other states are considering the same. These policies, which mandate the disclosure of intentionally added ingredients, empower consumers in understanding what is in their favourite menstrual products. But is this level of transparency good news for manufacturers? In this episode of ‘Attached to Hygiene’, host Jack Hughes explores these questions with Jane Wishneff, Executive Director for The Center for Baby and Adult Hygiene Products (BAHP). Together, they discuss emerging mandates and their current impact. Wishneff also shares what she expects to see in the future for absorbent hygiene products in the United States.Could 50 States Have 50 Conflicting Policies on AHPs?The absorbent hygiene product regulations in New York and California are rather different. The New York law, in effect now, is fairly brief. California's law, which begins January 2023, is quite detailed. They also vary in requirements and other important areas. Manufacturers are working to find solutions that will satisfy both sets of directives. Imagine the complexity the industry will face if all 50 U.S. states pass conflicting laws regarding transparency and sustainability. They may also disagree on where and how the information needs to be provided. Specific packaging for each state would be unworkable. It would also be a disservice to the consumers who are looking to the labels for information. So far, the FDA (America’s Food and Drug Administration) is gathering data but has not enacted any regulations. This has led several industry players to become proactive in offering feasible, transparent solutions.The European Union (E.U.) has already established regulations and guidelines regarding disposable hygiene products. This brings pressure on America to do likewise. But it also allows lawmakers and manufacturers to learn what works, and what could—or should—be done differently in the U.S. Lastly, American laws can, in a way, borrow the E.U.’s expertise. For example, the California law states that companies cannot claim as a confidential ingredient anything that the E.U. has designated a chemical of concern. The question remains: When, and what shape, will federal regulations take?Outline of the Episode[03:10] What Wishneff likes most about working in the hygiene industry[04:49] The pressures spurring ingredient disclosure for hygiene products[08:10] The effects of inconsistency in legislation for both consumers and manufacturers[12:08] Exploring ways to increase the availability of information (such as the Smart Label app)[14:45] A patchwork of ingredient disclosure laws: New York, California, and more[18:55] Proactive industry action and building a common, understandable language [20:59] The FDA on ingredient disclosures and UDI (unique devise identifiers)[27:03] Details and background on New York and California ingredient disclosure mandates and regulations[31:39] The European Union’s policies on sustainability help inform U.S. policy[34:15] What are intentionally added and unintentionally added ingredients?[37:46] Wishneff’s advice for U.S. companies: Stay informed. Be a part of the process. ResourcesYou can find Jane Wishneff on LinkedIn, or leave her a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com. You can also access the FemCare Answers Product Ingredient Glossary from BAHP that Jane mentioned in the interview right here!Get Connected with Attached to HygieneTake our listener survey to receive our new CSR Whitepaper.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
Take our listener survey to receive our new CSR Whitepaper.Menstruation is a normal and natural experience. And yet, people are still struggling to raise awareness of the needs it brings. Another area that needs work: ease of access to products. With these concerns in mind, ‘Attached to Hygiene’ takes a closer look at the megatrends driving the menstrual health market. Host Jack Hughes welcomes back Danielle Keiser, Managing Partner of Impact at Madami and Founder of Menstrual Health Hub. Together, they explore the main factors affecting the current culture of menstruation. What new types of reusable products are emerging in the market? How does socioeconomic status keep consumers from getting what they need? How are industry players and period product manufacturers responding to these market shifts? And lastly, what is the future of the menstrual health market? The Changing Menstrual Health Consumer TrendsIn the age of Millennials and Gen Z, the focus is changing from profit to people. Today’s menstrual health consumers want to experience menstruation on their own terms. Many are vocal about their desire for products that are reusable (e.g., menstrual cups or period panties). This is leading to innovations in the market, often created by the consumers themselves who found their needs were not being met. Danielle and Jack discuss the term ‘period poverty’ and why ‘menstrual equity’ is a more fitting depiction. As Danielle states, economic status should not have a negative impact on women who menstruate. At 51% of the population, this group should not be considered a ‘niche market’. Their voices need to be heard in all aspects of menstrual health including disposable hygiene products. Outline of the Episode[03:25] The current consumer trends in menstrual health products[05:40] Cultural shifts are creating new market opportunities[10:45] Women are crafting products based on their own needs[15:15] How innovation is driving the market (e.g., period panties) [21:11] Companies need to address what happens to their products in terms of waste management [24:56] How consumers are supplementing, mixing, and matching products to suit their needs[29:06] Why companies should implement a social impact strategy[32:50] Why ‘menstrual equity’ is a more apt term than ‘period poverty’[39:25] The misconception surrounding menopause and perimenopause, and meeting the needs of perimenopausal women[44:10] Different bodies may require different solutions for their menstrual health[49:43] The goal of making menstruation as little of a problem as possible by putting people before profitResourcesYou can find Danielle Keiser on LinkedIn, on the official website of Madami and MHHub.org, or you can leave her a message through her email at danielle@mhhub.org.You can also download a copy of the Glossary for the Global Menstrual Movement, mentioned in today’s episode.You can learn more about the Decolonizing Menstrual Health project, onthe Menstrual Health Hub website.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneTake our listener survey to receive our new CSR Whitepaper.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
To gain the trust of menstrual product consumers, we need to truly understand their needs. This starts by examining whether current products answer the consumers' concerns on safety, usability, and environmental impact of the menstrual health market. In this episode of ‘Attached to Hygiene,’ Jan O'Regan, outgoing Director of Strategic Initiatives at Cotton Incorporated, explains the different segments in the menstrual health market. She and host Jack Hughes also discuss trends such as transparency and how Cotton Incorporated is tackling innovation in its quest to become more sustainable.The three stages of menstrual healthOne way to ensure we're meeting their needs is to identify how their menstrual health evolves over time. Jan cites three stages: teenage years, young adulthood, and established adulthood. How menstruators in these three groups experience menstruation can be vastly different. This in turn can have profound effect on their disposable hygiene needs, preferences, and buying habits. While the focus for the teenager is physical, the impact for the young adult is more emotional. The mature buyer generally has established routines; however, there is still room for growth in this market.Changing culture of menstrual health creates new opportunitiesThe menstrual health market continues to evolve through trends and innovation. Today’s consumers expect more transparency and want to know what is in the products they use. They are also more open about their menstruation experience with some young menstruators even hosting ‘period parties’. As the culture of menstrual health evolves, disposable hygiene manufacturers like you can take advantage of growth potential in many areas. It all comes down to listening to your consumers and finding ways to stand out in the market.Outline of the Episode[02:22] The three stages of menstrual health[03:43] How does menstruation affect young adult and established adult menstruators[06:40] How are brands targeting the different life stages of users?[11:00] The trend for transparent and informative packaging[13:43] Asking consumers what is in their menstrual health products[16:57] Evolution of regulation for products’ ingredients[20:15] Working with agricultural programs and industry organisations to support sustainable cotton[23:02] The ingredients of cotton and the cotton market[26:48] The biodegradability of cotton[29:12] What you shouldn't do with your cotton products, even if they're biodegradableResourcesYou can find Jan O'Regan on LinkedIn. (As this episode airs, Meghan Holliday will succeed Jan as Director of Nonwovens Marketing at Cotton Incorporated.) You can contact Meghan on LinkedIn or via her email at MHolliday@CottonInc.com.Check out Cotton Incorporated’s B2B resource hub, CottonWorks™. For more information on Cotton's efforts around sustainability, visit consumer-facing, Cotton Today or B2B site, Cotton Sustainability | CottonWorks™.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneSign up for our newsletter to get emails every two weeks with updates about new episodes, additional materials about what was discussed in the episode, and, starting in early 2022, exclusive content we've created around topics like sustainability, absorbent core, feminine hygiene, and others. This will include whitepapers, glossaries, 1-pagers, and other helpful learning materials. So if you want to stay up to date on everything we know about important industry topics, click this link to sign up for our Attached to Hygiene newsletter.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
In this episode of ‘Attached to Hygiene’, Jan O'Regan, outgoing Director of Nonwovens Marketing for Cotton Incorporated, helps us view the full scope of the menstrual health market. Today’s topic: the cultural, religious, and commercial factors that play a role in how women make their feminine hygiene choices. Listen as Jan and host, Jack Hughes, have a conversation about a variety of related subjects. Included in the discussion: What do consumers expect from the brands they purchase? Why are certain brands leading the way? What are the biggest opportunities for market growth?Continuing Cotton Incorporated’s Hygienix ConversationThis podcast interview elaborates on the presentation Cotton Incorporated gave at the annual Hygienix Conference in November of 2021, giving you additional information on the nonwoven markets and economic trends occurring today. Jan and Jack talk more in-depth about the research results conducted on qualitative focus groups from nine different countries. They delve into how this research gives us a better understanding of the global market for feminine hygiene products. For example, it was found that menstruation first occurs to women at an average of 12 years and 10 months old. This period lasts 5 days (again, on average), and menstruators may use as many as 12 period products in that time. Overall, this is a fast-moving, ever-evolving market with many opportunities for new brands. In fact, the menstrual health market is expected to grow by 25% from 2019 to 2024. Currently, China holds the biggest market for feminine hygiene products. India, on the other hand, is expected to continue as the fastest-growing region in the market. Understanding the changing needs and preferences of feminine hygiene consumers worldwide has the potential to offer great benefits for you as a manufacturer. This knowledge can prove helpful as you evaluate your current product line and explore future designs.Outline of the Episode[04:47] Cotton Incorporated, dedicated to research and marketing of all aspects of 'cotton'[06:34] Overview of Cotton Incorporated’s presentation at the annual Hygienix Conference[09:18] The countries that serve the biggest feminine hygiene markets[13:37] What can developing countries contribute to this market's continuous growth?[15:06] Why should the feminine hygiene market pay attention to Africa?[18:00] How cultural and religious factors affect the market [22:02] Which brands are succeeding in the marketplace and why[24:01] Opportunities for new brands entering the marketplace[28:02] Feminine hygiene is a quick-moving market that comes with a lot of opportunities for growthResourcesYou can find Jan O'Regan on LinkedIn. (As this episode airs, Meghan Holliday will succeed Jan as Director of Nonwovens Marketing at Cotton Incorporated.) You can contact Meghan on LinkedIn or via her email at MHolliday@CottonInc.com.Check out Cotton Incorporated’s B2B resource hub, CottonWorks™. For more information on Cotton's efforts around sustainability, visit consumer-facing, Cotton Today or B2B site, Cotton Sustainability | CottonWorks™.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneSign up for our newsletter to get emails every two weeks with updates about new episodes, additional materials about what was discussed in the episode, and, starting in early 2022, exclusive content we've created around topics like sustainability, absorbent core, feminine hygiene, and others. This will include whitepapers, glossaries, 1-pagers, and other helpful learning materials. So if you want to stay up to date on everything we know about important industry topics, click this link to sign up for our Attached to Hygiene newsletter.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
Roughly half of the world’s population experiences menstruation at some point in their lives. As it affects so many individuals, you'd think we as a society would have a greater understanding of menstrual health. But that's the thing. While it is a common, natural process, there's still so much we can learn. This episode of ‘Attached to Hygiene’ is the first in a series aimed at helping the industry design better products for her. Joining host Jack Hughes to discuss menstrual health and the specifics of the cycle is Danielle Keiser, Managing Partner of Impact at Madami and Founder of Menstrual Health Hub .On cycle health and the word hygieneWhen we talk about hygiene, the tendency is to think of making things clean. This is why Danielle believes using the term ‘menstrual hygiene’ is a disservice to the goal of promoting health and wellbeing. Simply using the word ‘hygiene’ reinforces the stigma of unclean—the need to sanitise—during a woman’s period . Danielle prefers ‘menstrual health’ or ‘cycle health’. Just like any other hygienic practice, we do these things to achieve a higher level of health. Plus, they both embrace the entire cycle.To design and produce better products, the industry needs a clearer understanding of her needs all month long. How can our products best support her through each of the four phases? According to Danielle, menstrual education empowers everyone, from the young girl to society as a whole. It also allows article producers to discover new opportunities within the menstrual health market.Outline of the Episode[03:39] International Menstrual Health Day[05:19] Madami – Solutionary experts and consultants in women-centred design[09:05] The value of paying attention to social enterprises[13:00] Menstrual health vs. menstrual hygiene management (MHM)[18:20] The downside of emphasising ‘hygiene’ rather than ‘cycle care’[22:42] The four phases of the menstrual cycle; how body chemistry influences energy and actions [32:46] Menstrual education before menstruation empowers young girls[35:11] Informed choice on contraception and menstrual health[40:08] Improved understanding of menstrual health catalyses new marketsResourcesYou can find Danielle Keiser on LinkedIn, on the official website of Madami and MHHub.org, or you can leave her a message through her email at danielle@mhhub.org.You can also download a copy of the Glossary for the Global Menstrual Movement, mentioned in today’s episode.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneSign up for our newsletter to get emails every two weeks with updates about new episodes, additional materials about what was discussed in the episode, and, starting in early 2022, exclusive content we've created around topics like sustainability, absorbent core, feminine hygiene, and others. This will include whitepapers, glossaries, 1-pagers, and other helpful learning materials. So if you want to stay up to date on everything we know about important industry topics, click this link to sign up for our Attached to Hygiene newsletter.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
In the single-use disposable hygiene industry, sustainability presents unique challenges, but the benefits can be equally great. Each change manufacturers make is multiplied by every article sold, so even incremental shifts really add up. What are industry players doing to meet sustainability goals? What should they be doing? What is the role of the consumer … or the government? In part 4 of our series on sustainability in Disposable Hygiene, Christophe Morel, Bostik’s Global Marketing Manager for Market Insights and Sustainable Innovation, joins host Jack Hughes to discuss how to improve end-of-life solutions for single-use products. The Role of the Key Players in the Disposable Hygiene IndustryExperimentation in the business and technical aspects for circularity is taking place in the industry. But how are absorbent article manufacturers to implement guidelines and get everyone involved? Producers seek ways to influence the consumer, though a number of them believe governing bodies need to enforce regulations in this area. Timing can also be a problem, especially when products are banned before a solution is in place. Ultimately, there needs to be a balance, legal framework, and incentives. When it comes to the role of disposable hygiene adhesives in supporting better end-of-life options, there are three main areas of opportunity. One is through use of bio-based materials such as with Bostik’s new product line, Nuplaviva™. The second is by reducing the weight of the product, thus using fewer resources. Third is designing products to facilitate more circular processing after use. What Are the Most Circular End-of-Life Solutions?Composting and recycling are two main end-of-life possibilities, but there are drawbacks to each. For example, with today’s technologies the benefits may not outweigh the costs, whether in energy use or CO2 emissions. There is no easy solution, but we as an industry need to keep looking into potential options. In an economy with limited resources, progress still needs to be made, one step at a time. But in the future, the key will not be in creating a single recyclable product, but rather implementing a process that is able to recycle any product. In that future, producers, suppliers, municipalities, and consumers will all play a role in developing and implementing solutions.Outline of the Episode[2:35] What are industry players doing to improve end-of-life solutions for disposable hygiene products?[4:31] Pilot situations and experiments for sustainability around the world[7:09] Governing bodies are enacting regulations to further sustainability efforts[9:48] What role does the adhesive play in supporting end-of-life possibilities?[14:40] Recycling as an option for end-of-life scenarios [16:37] The current limitations of composting[22:15] Market examples of efforts toward sustainability [24:38] The importance of creating a process that can recycle any product[25:30] The materials involved in the recycling process[28:08] Can (or should) producers also take on the role of recycling?ResourcesDownload our sustainability glossary, as mentioned in the podcast.You can find Christophe Morel on LinkedIn, or you can leave him a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneSign up for our newsletter to get emails every two weeks with updates about new episodes, additional materials about what was discussed in the episode, and, starting in early 2022, exclusive content we've created around topics like sustainability, absorbent core, feminine hygiene, and others. This will include whitepapers, glossaries, 1-pagers, and other helpful learning materials. So if you want to stay up to date on everything we know about important industry topics, click this link to sign up for our Attached to Hygiene newsletter.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
According to current estimates, some 6-7 billion disposable hygiene articles are produced annually worldwide. Where available, they have been shown to benefit women, children, and other segments of society. But what will it take to bring disposable hygiene into a more circular economy? In part 3 of this episode of ‘Attached to Hygiene’, Christophe Morel, Bostik's Global Technical Marketing Manager, joins host Jack Hughes to consider the possibilities.A New Era of Resource Management in Disposable HygieneOver the last 50 years, the disposable hygiene industry has made great strides in reducing the weight of baby diapers. This inevitably reduced the resources needed to produce them. Even so, more can be done. In addition to further weight reduction, shifting away from fossil resources including fuel for energy will help. The market will also need to find economical ways to produce renewable raw materials. The current rate of production falls far short of what the industry consumes today. And, as articles become available in underserved regions of the world, even more will be required.End-of-Life Management Includes Everything From Design to RecyclingTo make the industry more circular, managing end-of-life outcomes should begin early, in the design phase. For example: As much as 70% of the discarded product is human waste. How will it be removed? Do the plastics and other components need to be separated? If so, how can it be done economically? After all, any sustainable improvement should also bring its share of financial benefits. Otherwise, it’s not sustainable … it’s philanthropy. The efforts of other industries around recycling may give disposable hygiene a glimpse of what lies ahead.Outline of the Episode[04:40] Sustainability is about society, economy, and the environment. How is the industry doing?[07:00] The industry’s 4 key challenges for improving sustainability[11:51] Efforts to minimise the use of resources and reduce waste [16:55] Is there one definition for a sustainable diaper? Why all solutions are welcome[20:05] Successes and challenges in other industries’ recycling efforts[23:28] A large part of bringing disposable hygiene into the circular economy is managing the flow of carbon[27:44] The value of designing products with end-of-life scenarios in mind[30:06] How realistic is designing disposable hygiene products for circularity?[33:20] The feasibility of switching to bio-sourced and renewable materials[36:22] Not all bio-sourced materials are better for the environment[38:04] Today’s limited supply of bio-sourced materialsResourcesYou can find Christophe Morel on LinkedIn, or you can leave him a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneSign up for our newsletter to get emails every two weeks with updates about new episodes, additional materials about what was discussed in the episode, and, starting in early 2022, exclusive content we've created around topics like sustainability, absorbent core, feminine hygiene, and others. This will include whitepapers, glossaries, 1-pagers, and other helpful learning materials. So if you want to stay up to date on everything we know about important industry topics, click this link to sign up for our Attached to Hygiene newsletter.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
In one way or another, today’s disposable hygiene products benefit almost everyone … babies, parents, women, older adults, and more. Protecting the planet for future generations is a goal that an increasing number of companies and consumers are embracing. So, what can we as an industry do to help?For disposable hygiene manufacturers, reducing their carbon footprint takes many forms. Processes, machinery, operating procedures, safety, and cost are among the many factors that can’t be overlooked. In Part 2 of this sustainability series, Seif Shaarawy, Bostik's Operations Director, and Luke Burkholder, Technical Account Manager at Bostik, discuss the challenges that come with sustainable production and the steps Bostik has taken toward creating and supporting more sustainable products and operations.Reducing Product Weight Helps to Cut Costs, Material Consumption, and WasteThe four big challenges producers face in reducing the weight of their product are resource management, waste management, societal improvements, and process efficiency. Seif and Luke discuss the importance of the disposable hygiene industry working together to address these challenges. Reducing weight—doing more with less—has been a trend for decades. But now, it’s not just about cost and convenience; the very health of the planet is at stake. Substrates, adhesive add-on, and product design are all considered. An obvious target for weight reduction is the core. This can include changing the ratio of SAP to fluff, or using a compound/pre-compound core or channel core (learn more about channel core with our video). Luke concludes this episode by explaining how crucial a role the adhesive plays in enabling weight and waste reduction. Outline of the Episode[03:27] What is the essence of being a responsible manufacturer?[04:46] Reusing is a step up from recycling[09:04] Scope 1, 2, and 3: three categories for emissions[11:57] The transition to LED lighting and smart processes[15:40] Why safety and health of stakeholders must be a top priority[20:59] The challenges that generally come with sustainable production[23:19] A 2018 report by the United States Environmental Protection Agency[26:16] What weight reduction in product design means for producers in the disposable hygiene industry[30:19] The ways you can change the product to take out weight[33:05] What role are adhesives playing in supporting the producers of their core?ResourcesYou can find Seif Shaarawy and Luke Burkholder on LinkedIn, or you can leave them a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com.To hear the full interview with Seif Shaarawy, watch our webinar ‘Sustainable Production at Bostik’.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneSign up for our newsletter to get emails every two weeks with updates about new episodes, additional materials about what was discussed in the episode, and, starting in early 2022, exclusive content we've created around topics like sustainability, absorbent core, feminine hygiene, and others. This will include whitepapers, glossaries, 1-pagers, and other helpful learning materials. So if you want to stay up to date on everything we know about important industry topics, click this link to sign up for our Attached to Hygiene newsletter.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
In this encore podcast, Jack is joined by Christophe to offer a fresh take on the consumer's need for confidence, and how it drives disposable hygiene market trends.Exploring the Consumer’s Need for ConfidenceAccording to Christophe, there’s more to a product’s ability to instill confidence than you might think. As article producers, you want your consumers to have confidence (trust) in the performance and safety of your disposable hygiene products and your brand. But there’s another angle to consider: How can diapers, pads, and other products give their users confidence in themselves and increase their freedom to enjoy life? Listen to the full episode to find out.Outline of the Episode[05:09] Consumer confidence in your products and in themselves[08:06] How consumer confidence impacts the disposable hygiene industry overall[09:50] Expectations differ by age and market[10:45] Confidence in your product’s discretion and safety [12:12] The impacts of substances of interest, past and present[14:30] Three consequences of public conversations about substances of interest[17:00] Adult incontinence and the need for discretion[20:58] Feminine hygiene products: stigma, discretion, and stay-in-place performance[24:39] The role of adhesives in supporting consumer confidenceResourcesYou can find Christophe Morel on LinkedIn, or you can leave him a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com. Bostik recently launched another podcast called Bostik Talks & Transition(s). The podcast is all about finding inspiration, collaboration and learning from CSR experts, from Bostik and other multinational companies, how to transition to a more sustainable business model. Christophe was featured on episode 3 of Bostik Talks to share our strategy around sustainability in the disposable hygiene industry. Check out his episode here.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneSign up for our newsletter to get emails every two weeks with updates about new episodes, additional materials about what was discussed in the episode, and, starting in 2022, exclusive content we've created around topics like sustainability, absorbent core, feminine hygiene, and others. This will include whitepapers, glossaries, 1-pagers, and other helpful learning materials. So if you want to stay up to date on everything we know about important industry topics, click this link to sign up for our Attached to Hygiene newsletter.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
The movement towards more sustainable products—important to consumers and manufacturers alike—has created multiple challenges and opportunities for disposable hygiene manufacturers today. Even when addressed with transparency, information from producers can quickly garner skepticism, distrust, and a bad reputation overall. In Part 1 of this episode of "Attached to Hygiene," host Jack Hughes is joined by Bostik's Global Market Marketing Manager, Market Insights and Sustainable Innovation, Christophe Morel, and Bostik's R&D Engineer, Laurianne Libralesso, to discuss how Bostik views and defines sustainability in the scope of disposable hygiene adhesives.Sustainable products – What are the real issues?Sustainability isn’t just about protecting the environment. That’s one important aspect, yes, but Christophe Morel identifies the societal aspects of consumer safety and consumer perception as also worthy of focused attention. Today, the most talked-about material for sustainable and non-sustainable products is plastics—specifically single-use plastics. Unfortunately, when the consumer thinks plastics, they can also think chemicals—a word whose mere mention can generate fear. (This is called Chemophobia.) While producers can work to address concerns about substances of interest (SOI), helping the consumer to FEEL safe is also a priority. The other issue lies in how a product's plastics impact the environment. A National Geographic study shows that about 91% of plastics used are never recycled. According to UNEP, the world produces 300 million tonnes of plastic waste every year. Today, that plastic waste can end up in landfills and, unfortunately, in far-off waters. But there are steps the disposable hygiene industry—and suppliers like Bostik—can take to improve sustainability going forward. Christophe and Laurianne outline several opportunities already being pursued.Outline of the Episode[03:13] Where consumers see issues when it comes to a product's sustainability[04:21] A quick calculation on the number of plastics produced each year [08:32] How producers respond to the market's increased attention on sustainable products[12:22] How does Bostik define sustainable adhesives?[16:09] When it comes to hygiene products, safety is the top concern![20:08] What the pandemic revealed about how consumers receive information[24:53] The market's scepticism around chemicals present in hygiene products[27:51] What is chemophobia, and how does it impact the market?[33:24] Manufacturers seek the approval of independent labelling systems[39:14] How is Bostik supporting its article producers in gaining our customers' trust?ResourcesYou can find Christophe Morel and Laurianne Libralesso on LinkedIn, or you can leave them a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com. Get Connected with Attached to HygieneConnect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
Aside from medical care, individuals that suffer from incontinence also struggle with an array of other issues that compound their condition. Addressing these sub-factors is key to empowering patients to tackle the condition to the best of their abilities. In Part 2 of this episode of "Attached to Hygiene," host Jack Hughes continues speaking with NorthShore Care Supplies Director of Marketing and Communications, Vicki Wolpoff, and NorthShore Owner and Founder, Adam Greenberg to discuss the secondary struggles that come with incontinence, the benefits of incorporating fashion and variety into adult care products, and how fundamental education is in ending the confusion around incontinence.Why You Don't Want to Confuse Your MarketOne of the many factors that hinder individuals suffering from incontinence is confusion. When patients don't understand the terms that appear in the materials they're reading, they tend to get discouraged. The reason is, when someone faces a condition they're shy about, the last thing they want to do is attract attention. As much as possible, they'll try to understand things on their own, but if they fail, they could give up. This is why it's critical for adult care products to be accessible, especially to the senior market. If the information in the packaging is too exclusive, people choosing from the options available on the shelves won't benefit. What's worse, some packaging may even prove to be counterproductive. For NorthShore, this becomes an opportunity to lead with designs that informs and educates. They provide educational materials to their consumers through packaging, blogs, and their company website for every step in the purchasing process.Outline of the Episode[02:01] What people with incontinence seek the most[03:43] Aside from the primary needs, what are the other factors that patients struggle with?[06:31] The need for more education about incontinence[09:07] Confusion hinders people from getting to know the products they need.[12:48] About NorthShore's most-read article: "Why shouldn't you double up?"[15:44] The effects of incorporating fashion into adult care products[18:53] COVID elevated everyone, including the elderly.[22:30] With sustainability comes innovation.[24:11] The medical-looking packages need to go![26:38] Flexibility differs when designing products for the lightly affected to the heavily affected patients.ResourcesYou can find Adam Greenberg and Vicki Wolpoff on LinkedIn, or you can leave them a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com.Also, follow NorthShore on the following links below:WebsiteLinkedInFacebookInstagramTwitterYouTubeGet Connected with Attached to HygieneConnect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
To deal with medical conditions efficiently, we need to understand their causes, effects, and who they are affecting. Most importantly, we must also break down the stigma that comes with them. If there's stigma, having the right conversation can be challenging, let alone finding the proper approach. In Part 1 of this episode of "Attached to Hygiene," host Jack Hughes is joined by Bostik's Global Marketing Director, Diane Toonen, NorthShore Care Supplies' Director of Marketing and Communications, Vicki Wolpoff, and NorthShore Owner and Founder, Adam Greenberg to give us an intro to incontinence and how it is affecting people in the US.Incontinence: Why is it an interesting case?Incontinence, when broadly explained, is the inability to voluntarily control urination and defecation. Generally, it is a medical condition that people exclusively associate with old age – only that it's not. Statistics show a wide range of demographics struggle with incontinence. It doesn't only affect the aging. In the US alone, 80 million people deal with some form of incontinence. In this 80 million, 1/3 are under 30, an age bracket that is most certainly considered young. Statistics also show that 1 in 4 adults struggle with bladder dysfunction, and 8% of the population face incontinence with bowel. Aside from the astounding numbers, what's even more interesting is how behind the US is when it comes to the issue. One factor that affects the current approach to the dilemma is stigma. Stigma contributes to the study that found those with the heaviest loss of bowel control are the ones who are also most likely not to seek medical care. The more impact the condition creates, the more likely the affected individual is to hide away from any sort of attention.Outline of the Episode[03:07] The Founder of NorthShore, Adam Greenberg's personal experience with incontinence.[05:12] Incontinence is a complex market segment.[07:22] NorthShore's multi-year approach to familiarizing themselves with struggles from incontinence.[11:16] People want to be normal in three different ways.[14:01] Breaking down Incontinence, its effects, who it affects, and where it comes from.[17:58] 80 million people are managing different levels of incontinence.[21:33] On whom does NorthShore focus the most?[23:53] The leading reason why eldery people go into nursing homes.[26:34] How did COVID affect assisted living facilities, and where does NorthShore come in?[29:44] Work and wastes can be lessened!ResourcesYou can find Adam Greenberg, Diane Toonen, and Vicki Wolpoff on LinkedIn, or you can leave them a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com.Also, follow NorthShore on the following links below:WebsiteLinkedInFacebookInstagramTwitterYouTubeIf you'd like to learn more about the Incontinence – The Engineering Challenge Conference you can click the link below.https://events.imeche.org/ViewEvent?code=CON7265Get Connected with Attached to HygieneConnect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
When looking at brand and product growth, one factor that quickly drives the curve is trends. However, these trends differ in every market and region. Bostik, being a key player in the disposable hygiene sector, checks on how these trends look on the ground and how they affect planning and production. In Part 2 of this episode of “Attached to Hygiene,” host Jack Hughes and Bostik’s Global NW Operations Director, Seif Shaarawy, together with Bostik’s Europe Sales Director, Pietro Landone, continue the discussion on growth and market response with a focus on how commoditisation, trends, and basic consumer needs come into play as market driving forces.How is ‘sustainability’ affecting the EMEA Market?Both Seif and Pietro agree that sustainability is a significant influence on the markets within the EMEA regions. For the millennial generation, sustainability is an essential focus for literally everything. Because of this, it can only be assumed that eventually, more heed will be given to thise factor. In the European markets, for example, producers exert extensive efforts to make diapers less ‘unsustainable.’ More investments are also going into the R&D and innovation of products like diapers to achieve more eco-friendliness in production and design. Furthermore, because recycling and waste segregation are recently seen more seriously in the Middle East and African regions, global producers make big moves to ensure a positive impact through their corporate social responsibilities. As a result of the trend, even recycling businesses are witnessing rapid growth and are becoming more and more popular in startups.Outline of the Episode[02:07] The impact – Commoditisation.[03:18] ---all these things oblige companies to look into alternatives. [07:25] A challenge and a way for us to differentiate ourselves. [09:45] The challenge is the same in the Middle East and Africa.[12:30] Pietro Landone on the trends around convenience in the EU market.[14:40] How do the Middle East and Africa see the need for convenience?[17:32] People find more confidence in products that aren’t odoured, scented, or fragrant.[20:14] The Middle East and Africa will slowly become more and more environmentally friendly. [22:04] Are diapers environmentally friendly?[24:18] Sustainability is affecting even the economy in the MEA regions.ResourcesYou can find Seif Shaarawy and Pietro Landone on LinkedIn, or you can leave them a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneYou can find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
As industry leaders in disposable hygiene adhesives, it’s crucial to monitor the growth of Bostik’s three main market segments through the lenses of population, birth rates, emerging consumer preferences, and trends. In developing regions around the globe that are highly populated, that means there is a lot to consider. In Part 1 of this episode of “Attached to Hygiene,” host Jack Hughes and Bostik’s Global Operations Director, Seif Shaarawy, together with Bostik’s European Sales Director, Pietro Landone, discuss the different expectations for growth and the factors that shape it in the EMEA (Europe, Middle East, Africa) markets.Connectivity and eCommerce in the EMEA MarketsFor Bostik’s EMEA markets, user habits that greatly influence the current market include the steady increase of eCommerce in all regions. On the subject, Pietro Landone cites a study in the EU that confirms that English consumers in the United Kingdom have the most access to eCommerce. This envelops the number of purchases the average buyer makes per week and the time they spend on the platforms compared to the results brought about by consumers who buy more traditionally Seif Shaarawy is also seeing a similar trend in the Middle East and African regions. To focus on Africa alone, Seif highlights how Africa has the most digitally connected people on the planet. With close to four hundred million internet users with access to mobile phones across all age brackets, this is an excellent opportunity to reach the connected consumers out of Africa’s 1.7 billion people.Outline of the Episode[01:53] What can we expect from the episode on the EMEA markets?[03:01] Meeting our guests Seif and Pietro[06:49] Growth and the emerging geographies in the Middle East and Africa[09:16] How immigration contributes to the European demographic[12:30] The changes in GDP and the expectation for recovery in the EMEA Market[16:19] Birth rates in the hygiene industry.[19:34] How is the aging European population impacting the market?[23:12] eCommerce is becoming an important channel[25:50] The connectivity of the African consumer market[28:14] What will be covered in part 2 of the episode on the EMEA markets?ResourcesYou can find Seif Shaarawy and Pietro Landone on LinkedIn, or you can leave them a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneYou can find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. You can find Attached to Hygiene wherever you get your podcast!Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.
How will the nonwovens industry look in 2035? From a declining birth rate to unexpected world events to regulations, “business as usual” may be substantially different in just over a decade. In this episode of “Attached to Hygiene,” host Jack Hughes delves into predictions with three long-time players in the industry: Nick Carter, Vice President, Nonwovens Marketing at Avgol Nonwovens; DeeAnn Nelson, NA-R&D and Innovation Manager at Avgol; and Darius Deak, Global R&D Director for Bostik. Together they use their decades of experience to make informed projections for the disposable hygiene market. Highlights include:The influence of purchasing decisions and lifestyle choices by Millennials and Gen Z consumers How outside factors such as legislation could change the industryWhat products and new innovations will look like in the futureHow “black swan” events like COVID-19 will play a roleThe growing focus on trends such as sustainabilityRecommended ResourcesContact Nick on LinkedIn.Contact DeeAnn on LinkedIn.Contact Darius on LinkedIn.Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman at Green Onion Creative.
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