DiscoverThe Secrets of Mathematics
The Secrets of Mathematics
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The Secrets of Mathematics

Author: Oxford University

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A series of talks and lectures from Oxford Mathematicians exploring the power and beauty of their subject. These talks would appeal to anyone interested in mathematics and its ever-growing range of applications from medicine to economics and beyond.
85 Episodes
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The Grey Squirrel invasion explaining tumour cell proliferation? Alan Turing explaining football shirt patterns? The close relationship between slugs and the human heart? What is the common link? Mathematics of course. And Philip Maini. Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.
In this, the second online lecture we are making widely available, Ben Green introduces and delivers a short lecture on Primitive Roots, part of the Number Theory Lecture course for Second Year Undergraduates. We are making these lectures available (there are many more on this YouTube Channel via the Playlist) to give an insight in to the student experience and how we teach Maths in Oxford. All lectures are followed by tutorials where pairs of students spend an hour with their tutor to go through the lectures and accompanying work sheets. An overview of the course and the relevant materials is available here: https://courses.maths.ox.ac.uk/node/44147
Oxford has gone online for lockdown. So how do our student lectures look? Let Marc Lackenby show you as he looks at paths between vertices in a graph with a view to finding the shortest route between any two vertices. Works for your Satnav for example. We are making these lectures available (there are many more on this YouTube Channel via the Playlist) to give an insight in to the student experience and how we teach Maths in Oxford. All lectures are followed by tutorials where pairs of students spend an hour with their tutor to go through the lectures and accompanying work sheets. An overview of the course and the relevant materials is available here: https://courses.maths.ox.ac.uk/node/44174
Smartphones v COVID 19

Smartphones v COVID 19

2020-05-1953:57

Smartphones will help save lives. Smartphones' value is exaggerated. What is the reality? And, as ever, what is the Maths behind it all? Leading Network Scientist Renaud Lambiotte downloads the facts in this Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture.
Models. They are dominating our Lockdown lives. But what is a mathematical model? We hear a lot about the end result, but how is it put together? What are the assumptions? And how accurate can they be? In our first online only lecture Robin Thompson, Research Fellow in Mathematical Epidemiology in Oxford, will explain. Robin is working on the ongoing modelling of Covid-19 and has made many and varied media appearances in the past few weeks
Oxford Mathematician Peter Howell starts the second part of the 2nd year Differential Equations course which focuses on boundary problems. This lecture follows on from the lecture series last term - the first lecture of that series can be seen here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mGAh2GlD6I&t=708s We are making these lectures available to give an insight in to the student experience and how we teach. All lectures are followed by tutorials where pairs of students spend an hour with their tutor to go through the lectures and accompanying work sheets. An overview of the course and the relevant materials is available here: https://courses.maths.ox.ac.uk/node/44050
So much noise, so many opinions. Perhaps time for Occam's Razor to start its scientific shaving? In this latest Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture Alan Champneys argues that Mathematics is at its best when it challenges assumptions. For example the wobbling of the Millennium Bridge in London in 2000. Caused by crowds synchronising? Alan begs to differ.
Our latest student lecture features the first lecture in the third year course on Mathematical Models of Financial Derivatives from Sam Cohen where we hear that the role of derivatives is not to make money but to avoid being exploited. We are making these lectures available to give an insight in to the student experience and how we teach. All lectures are followed by tutorials where pairs of students spend an hour with their tutor to go through the lectures and accompanying work sheets. An overview of the course and the relevant materials is available here: https://courses.maths.ox.ac.uk/node/42203
Our latest student lecture features the first lecture in the second term introductory course on Linear Algebra from leading Oxford Mathematician James Maynard. We are making these lectures available to give an insight in to the student experience and how we teach. All lectures are followed by tutorials where pairs of students spend an hour with their tutor to go through the lectures and accompanying work sheets. An overview of the course and the relevant materials is available here: https://courses.maths.ox.ac.uk/node/43829
How do you make a star-shaped Cheerio? How do they make the glass on your smartphone screen so flat? And how can you make a vacuum filter that removes the most dust before it blocks? All of these challenges fall under the umbrella of industrial mathematics and they all have a common theme: we know the final properties of the product we want to make and need to come up with a way of manufacturing this. Ian Griffiths demonstrates how we can use mathematics to start with the final desired product and trace the problem ‘back in time’ to manufacture products that would otherwise be impossible to produce. Ian Griffiths is a Professor of Industrial Mathematics and a Royal Society University Research Fellow in the Mathematical Institute at the University of Oxford.
Carlo Rovelli delivers The Roger Penrose Lecture on the Quantum structure of Spacetime. In developing the mathematical description of quantum spacetime, Loop Quantum Gravity stumbled upon a curious mathematical structure: graphs labelled by spins. This turned out to be precisely the structure of quantum space suggested by Roger Penrose two decades earlier, just on the basis of his intuition. Today these graphs with spin, called "spin networks" have become a common tool to explore the quantum properties of gravity. In this talk Carlo will tell this beautiful story and illustrate the current role of spin networks in the efforts to understand quantum gravity. 
 Carlo Rovelli is a Professor in the Centre de Physique Théorique de Luminy of Aix-Marseille University where he works mainly in the field of quantum gravity and  is a founder of loop quantum gravity theory. His popular-science book 'Seven Brief Lesson on Physics' has been translated into 41 languages and has sold over a million copies worldwide. The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.
From the unfairness of voting on TV shows to how Santa gets down so many narrow chimneys. Chris Budd take a mathematical look at the traditions of Christmas. Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.
Via guitars, clarinets and a musical saw to the noise reduction in a vaccum cleaner, Jon Chapman explains the role of waves in the sounds we hear and don't hear. Jon Chapman is Professor of Mathematics and Its Applications in the University of Oxford. Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.
Our latest student lecture is the first in the Quantum Theory course for second year students. Fernando Alday reflects on the breakdown of the deterministic world and describes some of the experiments that defined the new Quantum Reality. This is the sixth lecture in our series of Oxford Mathematics Student Lectures. The lectures aim to throw a light on the student experience and how we teach. All lectures are followed by tutorials where pairs of students spend an hour with their tutor to go through the lectures and accompanying work sheets. An overview of the course and the relevant materials are available here: https://courses.maths.ox.ac.uk/node/44141
In our Oxford Mathematics London Public Lecture Tim Gowers uses the principle of generalization to show how mathematics progresses in its relentless pursuit of problems. After the lecture in a fascinating Q&A with Hannah Fry, Tim discusses how he approaches problems, both mathematical and personal. Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.
Mathematics has no place for emotion, its practitioners are positively unemotional. True? Well, no. In fact 10 out of 10 untrue. Mathematics and mathematicians are also on the emotional rollercoaster. Vicky Neale is one of them. The Oxford Mathematics Newcastle Public Lecture was a partnership with Northumbria University and the latest in our series of lectures outside Oxford as we spread the word about mathematics and mathematicians around the UK and beyond. Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.
We continue with our series of Student Lectures with this first lecture in the 2nd year Course on Differential Equations. Professor Philip Maini begins with a recap of the previous year's work before moving on to give examples of ordinary differential equations which exhibit either unique, non-unique, or no solutions. This leads us to Picard's Existence and Uniqueness Theorem... This latest student lecture is the fifth in our series shining a light on the student experience in Oxford Mathematics.  The full course overview and materials can be found here: https://courses.maths.ox.ac.uk/node/44002
In our latest student lecture we would like to give you a taste of the Oxford Mathematics Student experience as it begins in its very first week. In this lecture in the Introductory Calculus course Dan Ciubotaru summarises how the course works and what we expect the new students to already know in order to ensure all of them are prepared for the more complex work ahead. An overview of the course and the course materials are here: https://courses.maths.ox.ac.uk/node/43879
What do you need to win the Premier League? Money? Sure. Good players? Yup. A great manager? It helps. Mathematics? Really? 100%. Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.
Our Open Days are intended to give an insight in to Maths at Oxford, whether you are a potential applicant or are just curious. In this talk about the Applied Maths that our undergraduates study at Oxford, Dominic Vella uses everyday examples to explain that Applied Mathematics is about looking afresh at the world around you, looking at scientific problems and using mathematical models to solve them.
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