DiscoverBreaking Green
Breaking Green
Claim Ownership

Breaking Green

Author: Global Justice Ecology Project / Host Steve Taylor

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

Produced by Global Justice Ecology Project, Breaking Green is a podcast that talks with activists and experts to examine the intertwined issues of social, ecological and economic injustice. Breaking Green also explores some of the more outrageous proposals to address climate and environmental crises that are falsely being sold as green.
5 Episodes
Reverse
As many nations promise net-zero emissions to fight climate change, corporate interests continue to promote offsets as opposed to the actual reduction of greenhouse gas emissions at the source. So-called nature-based solutions promote a green economy that commodifies nature and reduces ecosystems to a balance sheet of commodities to be traded for license to destroy and pollute elsewhere. Now there is a proposal for Whale offsets. Breaking Green is produced by Global Justice Ecology Project.To become a sponsor of Breaking Green, CLICK HERE.
Climate change threatens more catastrophic flooding, fires and even food insecurity. In response, agricultural companies are promoting what they call climate safe agriculture. But are huge agriculture companies concerned for our collective food future, or are they leveraging the very real threat of climate change to promote more industrial monocultures, genetically engineered crops and the capture of markets from smaller, independent and often indigenous farmers?  In this episode of Breaking Green, we will talk to Kartini Samone, a GRAIN activist based in Jakarta.  Breaking Green is produced by Global Justice Ecology Project.To become a sponsor of Breaking Green, CLICK HERE. 
In this episode of Breaking Green, we talk with  eminent environmental scientist, Dr. Michael Dorsey, about the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and current UN effort to address our collective future.The IPCC has issued a code red on climate change. The report states that there is an imminent risk of hitting the internationally agreed upon limit of 1.5 degrees in just decades and that immediate action is needed to avoid global warming's most dire consequences. But is there the political will to act? What solutions are being proposed? Are they likely to work or just technofixes designed to prop up business as usual?Breaking Green is produced by Global Justice Ecology Project.To become a sponsor of Breaking Green, CLICK HERE.
Breaking Green talks with biologist Dr. Rachel Smolker about false solutions to climate change.  The ravages of Global Climate Change are becoming more apparent every day, and people and nations are becoming more desperate for solutions. But there is increasing concern that agreements within the United Nations annual climate conferences are being driven by corporate interests that seek to monetize nature itself and secure corporate profits instead of addressing the root causes of climate change. Green capitalism with proposals such as payments for environmental services and carbon trading, allow corporations to continue business as usual under a green veneer. Some proposals even suggest global techno fixes that would alter weather patterns on a planetary scale.Breaking Green is produced by Global Justice Ecology Project.To become a sponsor of Breaking Green, CLICK HERE.The compendium of false solution to climate change is Hoodwinked in the Hothouse.
Breaking Green interviews Orin Langelle, photojournalist and Co-founder of Global Justice Ecology Project, about carbon colonialism and the UN's program, Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD).REDD allows trading of the carbon stored in forests, mainly in the Global South, to offset emissions from polluters mainly in the Global North. It shifts the burden of these emissions from the polluters to Indigenous and rural communities that lose access to their forests due to REDD deals, and to the communities where the polluter is based who must endure unending pollution.Langelle talks about his 2011 trip to Amador Hernandez, an Indigenous village in the Lacandon Jungle of Chiapas, Mexico. He traveled to the community to document resistance to a threatened forced relocation of the community due to a REDD deal between California and Chiapas, and to explore the deeper social and ecological impacts of unjust false solution schemes like REDD.His reporting was central to the film, A Darker Shade of Green,  REDD Alert and the Future of Forests.Breaking Green is produced by Global Justice Ecology Project.To become a sponsor of Breaking Green, CLICK HERE.
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store