DiscoverPsych Attack
Psych Attack
Claim Ownership

Psych Attack

Author: Dr Jasmine B. MacDonald

Subscribed: 2Played: 39
Share

Description

Psych Attack focuses on the diversity of the domain of psychology. Join us for a relaxed conversation with experts discussing the topics they are passionate about in psychological research and/or practice. The aim is to better understanding the spectrum of human experience, the methods used in psychology, and the people attracted to working within it. The conversations will be of interest and accessible to novice and experienced psychology listeners alike.

Hosted by Dr Jasmine B. MacDonald (jasminebmacdonald.com.au).
14 Episodes
Reverse
About this episodeIn this episode I catch up with Dr Rachael Fox, journal editor and academic, to discuss what publishing in psychology is and take a critical lens to highlight some issues and barriers to publishing.  We discuss:·      critical and community psychological approaches to research·      why people publish in psychology·      common ways quality is thought about in psychological research and publishing·      kinds of journals and how they are ranked·      how research either about or conducted by certain groups of people can be excluded through mainstream publishing practices. Dr Rachael Fox is Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychology, Charles Sturt University, Australia. Rachael is Editor of the Australian Community Psychologist, an open access peer-reviewed journal. If you want to keep up to date with Rachael, you can reach out via her university profile page. More info about the ideas covered in this episodeContesi, F. & Terrone, E. (2018). Introduction. Philosophical Papers, 47(1), 1-20.Fox, R,  Nic Giolla Easpaig, B.  (2021). Engaging critical methodologies in qualitative research methods with undergraduate psychology students. Journal of Community Psychology, 49(1), 228– 240.Hagve, M. (2020). The money behind academic publishing. Tidsskrift for Den norske legeforening.Tracy, S. J. (2012). The toxic and mythical combination of a deductive writing logic for inductive qualitative research. Qualitative Communication Research, 1(1), 109-141. Van Noorden, R. (2013). Open access: The true cost of science publishing. Nature, 495, 426–429.  Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B (Host). (2023, March 13). A critical look at publishing in psychology with Dr Rachael Fox (No. 14) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.comAudio editThe audio edit for this episode was completed by Amy Edwards. Dr Jasmine B. MacDonald did a final edit for content. Transcript The transcript for this episode is under development. The version currently available has not been reviewed or edited yet. 
About this episodeThis episode focuses on Dr Abigail Alfrey’s research and practice on the ways animals can be involved in mental health practice. We discuss: (1) the significance of pets for people experiencing psychosis, (2) including dogs in cognitive assessment to improve testing experiences and outcomes for child clients, and (3) reducing practitioner burnout by promoting animals in the workplace. We touch super briefly on other creative methods, like poetry, in therapy. Dr Abigail Alfrey is Senior Clinical Psychologist at KMPT Early Intervention in Psychosis Service in England, and Sessional Lecturer at Canterbury Christ Church University. If you want to keep up to date with Abi, you can reach out on LinkedIn. Research papers discussed in this episodeAlfrey, A. (2021). The influence of dogs’ presence on children’s performance on cognitive tests: Implications for clinical practice. Human-Animal Interaction Bulletin. Alfrey, A., Church, S., Christodoulou, N., & Harding, E. (2022). “Why should the fish feel safe? I don’t feel safe!”: An Audit of Pet Ownership within an NHS Service for Adults with Severe Mental Illness, with Lessons for Service Improvement. People and Animals: The International Journal of Research and Practice, 5(1). Alfrey, A., Field, V., Xenophontes, I., Springham, N., & Holttum, S. (2022). Identifying the Mechanisms of Poetry Therapy and Perceived Effects on Participants: A Synthesised Replication Case Study. The Arts in Psychotherapy, 78, 101882. More info about other stuff mentioned in this episodeThe International Association of Human-Animal Interaction Organizations (IAHAIO) is the global association of organizations that engage in practice, research and/or education in animal assisted activity, animal assisted therapy, and service animal training. A short news article about Canterbury Christ Church University work with justice dogs. A short article about the global trend of pets in the workplace.                                                                                              Sensitive content warningThis episode refers to suicidal ideation in the context of mental health practice with clients who experience psychosis. However, suicide is not the focus of the episode and lived experiences are not discussed in detail. Please take care while listening and if you are feeling discomfort and think you would benefit from some support, please reach out to your GP or contact a service like Lifeline. Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B (Host). (2022, December 30). The role of animals in mental health practice with Dr Abigail Alfrey (No. 13) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.comAudio editThe audio for this episode was completed by Amy Edwards. Dr Jasmine B. MacDonald did a final edit for content. Transcript The transcript for this episode is under development.
About this episodeThis episode focuses on Dr Jasmine B. MacDonald’s research in trauma exposure and mental health in TV news workers. We discuss how camera operators and reporters have different kinds of trauma experiences, the importance of social support, substance use, and symptoms of PTSD, depression, anxiety, stress, and burnout. Dr Jasmine B. MacDonald is Senior Research Officer, Australian Institute of Family Studies and Adjunct Lecturer, School of Psychology, Charles Sturt University. If you want to keep up to date with Jasmine, you can visit her website, or reach out on Twitter or LinkedIn.Recorded: November 2021. Research papers discussed in this episodeWilliams-Wynn, N. & MacDonald, J. B. (In press). Trauma exposure and substance use in journalists: A narrative review. Australian Community Psychologist.MacDonald, J. B., Dale, E., Metcalf, D., Hodgins, G., & Saliba, A. J. (2021). Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder in journalist samples: A systematic literature review. Traumatology. DOI: 10.1037/trm0000337MacDonald, J. B., Backholm, K., Saliba, A. J., & Hodgins, G. (2021). Predictors of trauma reactions in TV news camera operators. Traumatology. DOI: 10.1037/trm0000332 MacDonald, J. B., Hodgins, G., & Saliba, A. J., Metcalf, D. (2021). Journalists and depressive symptoms: A systematic literature review. Trauma, Violence, and Abuse. DOI: 10.1177/15248380211016022 MacDonald, J. B., Fox, R., & Saliba, A. J. (2020). Contextualizing psychological outcomes for TV news journalists: Role differences in industry culture, organizational hierarchy and trauma exposure. Journal of Constructivist Psychology, DOI: 10.1080/10720 MacDonald, J. B., & Fox, R. (2018). Trauma Amongst TV News Crews: The protective function of crew solidarity. In M.-T. Leung, & L.-M. Tan (Eds.), Applied Psychology Readings (pp. 21–38). Singapore: Springer. MacDonald, J. B., Hodgins, G., & Saliba, A. J. (2017). Trauma exposure in journalists: A systematic literature review. Fusion Journal – Dangerous Journalism, Issue 11. Available online: http://www.fusion-journal.com/issue/011-dangerous-journalism/trauma-e MacDonald, J. B., Saliba, A. J., Hodgins, G., & Ovington, L. A. (2016). Burnout in journalists: A systematic literature review. Burnout Research, 3(2), 34–44. MacDonald, J. B., Saliba A. J., & Hodgins, G. (2016). Journalists and substance use: A systematic literature review. Substance Abuse, 37(3), 402–411. DOI: 10.1080/08897077.2015.1101732                                                                                              Sensitive content warningThis episode refers to a number of potentially traumatic events news workers might be exposed to like harm to children, death, sexual violence, and war/conflict. However, these topics are not the main focus of the episode and lived experiences are not discussed. Please take care while listening and if you are feeling discomfort and think you would benefit from some support, please reach out to your GP or contact a service like Lifeline. Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B. & Tillman, G. (Hosts). (2022, October 31). Mental health and TV news workers (No. 12) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.comAudio editThe audio edit for this episode was completed by Amy Edwards. Dr Jasmine B. MacDonald did a final edit for content. Transcript The transcript for this episode is under development; currently only complete up to 34 minutes.
About this episodeThis episode and the last one focus on Dr Evita March’s research in the area of cyber psychology. In this second part of our discussion, we consider how the dark tetrad of personality can help us understand cyber dating abuse. Along the way, we consider the role of attachment style and jealousy in intimate partner violence and coercive control online. Dr Evita March is a Senior Lecturer in psychology in the School of Science, Psychology and Sport, Federation University. If you want to keep up to date with Evita, you can visit her Federation University staff profile page or reach out on Twitter. Research papers discussed in this episodeBranson, M., & March, E. (2021). Dangerous dating in the digital age: Jealousy, hostility, narcissism, and psychopathy as predictors of cyber dating abuse. Computers in Human Behavior, 119. DOI:10.1016/j.chb.2021.106711 I also refer to this paper, so thought I would share it here too:Lim, S. Y., & MacDonald, J. B. (2022). COVID-19-related racial discrimination on Asian Australians: An evaluation of symptoms of psychological distress, social support, and acculturation. Traumatology. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/trm0000374                                                                                  Language warningThis episode refers to the sharing of unsolicited explicit images, sometimes referred to colloquially as ‘dick pics’, a term used occasionally in this episode. Sensitive content warningThis episode talks about cyber dating abuse. The discussion remains broad and at the level of variables that can predict the likelihood someone might be abusive towards their partner. Please take care while listening and if you are feeling discomfort and think you would benefit from some support, please reach out to your GP or contact a service like Lifeline or 1800RESPECT. Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B. (Host). (2022, June 5). An evolutionary perspective of online behaviour with Dr Evita March (Part 2: Cyber dating abuse)(No. 11) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.comAcknowledgementsThe transcript for this episode was developed by Eugenie Dale.
About this episodeThis episode and the next one focus on Dr Evita March’s research in the area of cyber psychology. In this first part of our discussion, we start by using mate selection as an example of evolutionary psychology. We then go on to see how the dark tetrad of personality can help us understand antisocial online behaviours like trolling. In the next episode, we dive into Evita’s research on cyber dating abuse. Dr Evita March is a Senior Lecturer in psychology in the School of Science, Psychology and Sport, Federation University. If you want to keep up to date with Evita, you can visit her Federation University staff profile page or reach out on Twitter. Research papers discussed in this episode March, E., & Steele, G. (2020). High esteem and hurting others online: Trait sadism moderates the relationship between self-esteem and internet trolling. Cyberpsychology, behavior and social networking, 23(7), 441–446. DOI: 10.1089/cyber.2019.0652                                                                                              Sensitive content warningThis episode refers briefly to suicide as a result of being trolled online. However, suicide is not the focus of the episode and lived experiences are not discussed. Please take care while listening and if you are feeling discomfort and think you would benefit from some support, please reach out to your GP or contact a service like Lifeline. Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B. (Host). (2022, April 20). An evolutionary perspective of online behaviour with Dr Evita March (Part 1: Trolling) (No. 10) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.comAcknowledgementsThe transcript for this episode was developed by Eugenie Dale.
About this episodeThis episode focuses on Dr Will Dobud’s research in the area of outdoor and adventure therapies. We unpack the solution-focused therapeutic work he does on expeditions with young people experiencing poor mental health and/or substance use. Dr Will Dobud is a Lecturer in social work in the School of Social Work and Arts, Charles Sturt University. Will is also the director of True North Expeditions, an adventure therapy program for adolescents, based in Adelaide, Australia. If you want to keep up to date with Will’s work, you can visit his website, CSU staff profile page, or reach out on Twitter or Facebook. Research papers discussed in this episodeDobud, W. W., & Harper, N. J. (2018). Of Dodo birds and common factors: A scoping review of direct comparison trials in adventure therapy. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 31, 16–24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.01.005 Harper, N.J., & Dobud, W.W. (Eds.). (2020). Outdoor therapies: An introduction to practices, possibilities, and critical perspectives (1st ed.). Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429352027 Pringle, G., Dobud, W., & Harper, N. J. (2021). The next frontier: Wilderness therapy and the treatment of complex trauma. In E. Brymer, M. Rogerson, & J. Barton (Eds.), Nature and health: Physical activity in nature (1 ed., pp. 191-207). Routledge. Sponsor shout outA big thank you to Taylor & Francis for sponsoring this episode. They are providing two electronic copies of Dr Will Dobud’s book ‘Outdoor therapies: An introduction to practices, possibilities, and critical perspectives’ for a special giveaway. To find out more about how to enter the draw to win a copy of Will’s book, please check out the Psych Attack social media accounts on either Twitter or Facebook.                                                                                          Sensitive content warningThis episode refers briefly to self-harm in the context of therapeutic practice with young people experiencing poor mental health. However, self-harm is not the focus of the episode and lived experiences are not discussed. Please take care while listening and if you are feeling discomfort and think you would benefit from some support, please reach out to your GP or contact a service like Lifeline. Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B. (Host). (2022, Jan 31). Exploring outdoor therapies with Dr Will Dobud (No. 9) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.comAcknowledgementsThe transcript for this episode was developed by Eugenie Dale.
About this episodeThis episode focuses on Dr Erica McIntyres’ transdisciplinary research in the area of environmental psychology. We discuss the impact of environmental contaminants and urban design on human and planetary health and wellbeing. Dr Erica McIntyre is a Research Consultant in the Institute for Sustainable Futures and a Visiting Fellow in the School of Public Health, Faculty of Health at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS). If you want to keep up to date with Erica’s research, you can visit her UTS staff profile page and Google Scholar page, or reach out on Twitter. In this episode, Erica refers to Khoo Teck Puat Hospital in Singapore as an example of biophilic design. You can read about the hospital and see some images here. Research papers discussed in this episodeConnon, I. L. C., Prior, J. H., McIntyre, E., Adams, J., & Madden, B (2019). How does living with a disability affect resident worry about environmental contamination? A study of a long-term pervasive hazard. Environmental Hazards, 18(5), 459–478. https://doi.org/10.1080/17477891.2019.1627997 McIntyre, E., Prior, J., Connon, I., Adams, J., & Madden, B. (2018). Sociodemographic predictors of residents worry about contaminated sites. The Science of the total environment, 643, 1623–1630. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.06.261 Prior, J. H., Connon, I. L. C., McIntyre, E., Adams, J., Capon, A., Kent, J., Rissel, C., Thomas, L. E., Thompson, S. M., Westcott, H. (2018). Built environment interventions for human and planetary health: Integrating health in climate change adaptation and mitigation. Public Health Research & Practice, 28(4). https://doi.org/10.17061/phrp2841831 Prior, J., Fam, D., McIntyre, E., Adams, J., & Connon, I. 2020. Guide for Creating Stakeholder Engagement Plans for Contaminated Sites in NSW. University of Technology Sydney. http://hdl.handle.net/10453/142930                                                                                              Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B. (Host). (2021, December 18). The impact of the environment on health and wellbeing with Dr Erica McIntyre (No. 8) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.com
About this episodeIn this episode, Dr Tanya Hanstock and I discuss key issues in mental health for children and young people, using bipolar disorder as an example. Tanya also offers practical tips for how to balance research and practice. Dr Tanya Hanstock is a Senior Lecturer with the School of Psychological Sciences, University of Newcastle, Australia. If you want to keep up to date with Tanya’s research you can visit her university profile page or reach out via email (tanya.hanstock@newcastle.edu.au). Research papers discussed in this episodeHanstock, T., & Tse, S. (2017). Bipolar disorders. In N. Pelling, & L. Burton, Abnormal psychology in context: The Australian and New Zealand handbook (pp. 106–115). Cambridge. Kay-Lambkin, F. J., Thornton, L., Lappin, J. M., Hanstock, T., Sylvia, L., Jacka, F., Baker, A. L., Berk, M., Mitchell, P. B., Callister, R., Rogers, N., Webster, S., Dennis, S., Oldmeadow, C., MacKinnon, A., Doran, C., Turner, A., & Hunt, S. (2016). Study protocol for a systematic review of evidence for lifestyle interventions targeting smoking, sleep, alcohol/other drug use, physical activity, and healthy diet in people with bipolar disorder. Systematic Reviews, 5(1), 106. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13643-016-0282-9 Nunn, K., Hanstock, T., & Lask, B. (2008). Who's who of the brain: A guide to its inhabitants, where they live and what they do. Jessica Kinglsey Publishers. Scott, N., Hanstock, T. L., & Patterson-Kane, L. (2013). Using narrative therapy to treat eating disorder not otherwise specified. Clinical Case Studies, 12(4), 307–321. https://doi.org/10.1177/1534650113486184                                                                                     Sponsor shout outA big thank you to Jessica Kingsley Publishers for sponsoring this episode. They are providing two copies of Dr Tanya Hanstock’s book ‘Who's who of the brain’ for a special giveaway. To find out more about how to enter the draw to win a copy of Tanya’s book, please check out the Psych Attack social media accounts on either Twitter or Facebook. Sensitive content warningThis episode refers to suicide and self-harm in the context of mental health practice with clients who have a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. However, these topics are not the main focus of the episode and lived experiences are not discussed. Please take care while listening and if you are feeling discomfort and think you would benefit from some support, please reach out to your GP or contact a service like Lifeline. Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B. (Host). (2021, October 30). Mental health disorders and child development with Dr Tanya Hanstock (No. 7) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.com
About this episodeThis episode focuses on Dr Nicole Sugden’s research using neuropsychological assessment tools and uses this work as the basis for a discussion of the importance of psychometric evaluation of assessment tools in general. In particular, we discuss Dr Sugden’s fascinating findings in the areas of premorbid functioning and prospective memory. Dr Nicole Sugden is a Lecturer with the School of Psychology, Charles Sturt University based in Bathurst, Australia. If you want to keep up to date with Nicole’s research you can visit her Research Gate profile or keep in touch on Twitter (@SudgenNicole).  Research papers discussed in this episodeSugden, N., Thomas, M., & Kiernan, M. (2021). A scoping review of the utility of self-report and informant-report prospective memory measures. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 1–31. https://doi.org/10.1080/09602011.2021.1875851 Sugden, N., Thomas, M., Kiernan, M., & Wilesmith, M. (2021). Validation of the Prospective Memory Concerns Questionnaire (PMCQ). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 15, 686850. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2021.686850 Thomas, M. D., Sugden, N., McGrath, A., Rohr, P., Weekes, C., & Skilbeck, C. E. (2020). Investigating the Test of Premorbid Functioning (TOPF) in predicting Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence - Second edition (WASI-II) scores in an Australian sample. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 17, 1–25. https://doi.org/10.1080/09602011.2020.1842213                                                                                              Sponsor shout outThis episode was sponsored by Arkadia Beverages who are all about taking some time out of the day for yourself. So, for this episode you might like to settle in with a warm cup of chai and enjoy an Arkadia moment. This episode also has info about how Australian listeners can go in the draw to win an Arkadia Beverages prize pack. Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B. (Host). (2021, September 30). Psychometrics and psychological assessment tools with Dr Nicole Sugden (No. 6) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.com
About this episodeThis episode focuses on Dr Averil Cook’s work in the area of political psychology. We discuss examples of how to apply systemic therapeutic approaches with the intention of challenging mainstream assumptions in psychology and developing research and practice that is driven by social justice and cultural awareness. Dr Averil Cook is Director and ​Clinical Psychologist at Bodhi And Psychology Pty Ltd, based in Sydney, Australia. If you want to keep up to date with Averil’s work, you can visit: http://www.bodhiandpsychology.com.au             Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B. (Host). (2021, August 30). Political psychology and systemic therapeutic approaches with Dr Averil Cook (No. 5) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.com
About this episodeThis episode focuses on Dr Robyn Brunton’s research unpacking the connection between women’s adverse childhood experiences, such as various kinds of abuse, and subsequent pregnancy-related anxiety. Dr Robyn Brunton is a Lecturer with the School of Psychology, Charles Sturt University based in Bathurst, Australia. If you want to keep up to date with Robyn’s research you can visit her university research outputs page.  Research papers discussed in this episodeBrunton, R., & Dryer, R. (2021). Child sexual abuse and pregnancy: A systematic review of the literature. Child abuse & neglect, 111, 104802. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2020.104802Brunton, R. J., Dryer, R., Krageloh, C., Saliba, A., Kohlhoff, J., & Medvedev, O. (2018). The Pregnancy-related Anxiety Scale: A validity examination using Rasch analysis. Journal of Affective Disorders, 236C, 127-135. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2018.04.116  Brunton, R. J., Dryer, R., Saliba, A., & Kohlhoff, J. (2019). The initial development of the Pregnancy-related Anxiety Scale. Women & Birth, 32(1), e118–e130. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2018.05.004 Brunton, R., Wood, T., & Dryer, R. (2020). Childhood abuse, pregnancy-related anxiety and the mediating role of resilience and social support. Journal of Health Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1177/1359105320968140 Dryer, R., & Brunton, R. (In press). Psychometric properties of the Pregnancy-related Anxiety Scale – Screener. Psychological Assessment.At the time of this episode’s release, Robyn’s book is available for pre-order:Dryer, R., & Brunton, R. (Eds.). (2021). Pregnancy-related anxiety: Theory, research, and practice. Routledge.                                                                                               Sensitive content warningThis episode covers the connection between child sexual, physical, and psychological abuse and subsequent experiences of pregnancy-related anxiety. Please take care while listening and if you are feeling discomfort and think you would benefit from some support, please reach out to your GP or contact a service like Lifeline. Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B. (Host). (2021, July 29). Women's psychosocial health with Dr Robyn Brunton (No. 4) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.com
About this episodeThis episode explores the intersection between physiotherapy and psychology with Ryan McGrath. Ryan describes his research unpacking encounters between physiotherapists and clients experiencing psychological distress. Ryan McGrath is a practicing physiotherapist and also a PhD candidate with the School of Community Health at Charles Sturt University, based in Albury, Australia. If you want to keep up to date with Ryan’s research you can visit his university research outputs page or email him on ryanlachlanmcgrath@gmail.com Research papers discussed in this episodeMcGrath, R. L., MacDonald, J. B., Verdon, S., Parnell, T., & Smith, M. (2021). Encounters between physiotherapists and clients with suicidal thoughts and behaviours: A narrative literature review. New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, 49 (3). DOI: 10.15619/NZJP/49.2.03 McGrath, R. L., Parnell, T., Verdon, S., MacDonald, J. B., Smith, M. (2020) Trust, conversations and the ‘middle space’: A qualitative exploration of the experiences of physiotherapists with clients with suicidal thoughts and behaviours. PLoS ONE, 15 (9). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0238884                                                                                              Sensitive content warningThis episode refers to suicidal thoughts and behaviours in the context of things physiotherapists are likely to have discussions with clients about. However, this episode covers the experiences of physiotherapists and specific lived experiences of clients are not discussed. Please take care while listening and if you are feeling discomfort and think you would benefit from some support, please reach out to your GP or contact a service like Lifeline. Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B. (Host). (2021, June 29). The intersection between physiotherapy and psychology with Ryan McGrath (No. 3) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.com
About this episodeThis episode explores mathematical models of how people make decisions with Dr Gabriel Tillman. Gabriel describes his research into why people are worse at driving when someone is talking to them, as well as the parts of speech sounds people use to understand what they are hearing. Dr Gabriel Tillman is a Lecturer in psychology at Federation University, based in Ballarat, Australia. If you want to keep up to date with Gabriel’s research, you can follow him on Google Scholar or Twitter. Research papers discussed in this episode Starns, J. J., Cataldo, A. M., Rotello, C. M., Annis, J., Aschenbrenner, A., Bröder, A., Cox, G., Criss, A., Curl, R. A., Dobbins, I. G., Dunn, J., Enam, T., Evans, N. J., Farrell, S., Fraundorf, S. H., Gronlund, S. D., Heathcote, A., Heck, D. W., Hicks, J. L., … Wilson, J. (2019). Assessing theoretical conclusions with blinded inference to investigate a potential inference crisis. Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science, 2 (4), 335–349. DOI: 10.1177/2515245919869583 |  Tillman, G., Benders, T., Brown, S. D., & van Ravenzwaaij, D. (2017). An evidence accumulation model of acoustic cue weighting in vowel perception. Journal of Phonetics, 61, 1–12. DOI: 10.1016/j.wocn.2016.12.001 Tillman, G., Strayer, D., Eidels, A., & Heathcote, A. (2017). Modeling cognitive load effects of conversation between a passenger and driver. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 79 (6), 1795–1803. DOI: 10.3758/s13414-017-1337-2.  Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B. (Host). (2021, June 22). Mathematical models of how people make decisions with Dr Gabriel Tillman (No. 2) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. https://www.psychattack.comAcknowledgementsThe transcript for this episode was developed by Eugenie Dale.
About this episodeThis episode explores the education and training of future psychologists with Dr Elly Quinlan. Elly describes her research unpacking tolerance of uncertainty in psychologists working with complex clients or clients who might be at risk, as well as the potential for discomfort to lead psychologists to avoid asking clients about their sexual abuse histories.  Dr Elly Quinlan is Senior lecturer and course coordinator for the Master of Professional Psychology program at the Australian College of Applied Psychology, based in Sydney, Australia. If you want to keep up to date with Elly’s research you can follow her on Research Gate. Research papers discussed in this episodeCauso, F., & Quinlan, E. (2021) Defeating dragons and demons: Consumers’ perspectives on mental health recovery in role-playing games. Australian Psychologist, 56 (3), 256–267, DOI: 10.1080/00050067.2021.1890983 Nixon, B., & Quinlan, E. (2021). Asking the hard questions: Psychologist’s discomfort with enquiring about sexual abuse histories. Violence Against Women. DOI: 10.1177/10778012211014558Quinlan, E., & Deane, F. P. (Under review). A longitudinal study of trainee psychologists’ tolerance of uncertainty, state anxiety and confidence in case formulation. Quinlan, E., Schilder, S., & Deane, F. P. (2021). “This wasn’t in the manual”: A qualitative exploration of tolerance of uncertainty in the practicing psychology context. Australian Psychologist, 56 (2), 154–167. DOI: 10.1080/00050067.2020.1829451  Sensitive content warningThis episode refers to suicide and sexual abuse histories in the context of things professional psychologists are likely to have discussions with clients about. However, these topics are not the main focus of the episode and lived experiences are not discussed. Please take care while listening and if you are feeling discomfort and think you would benefit from some support, please reach out to your GP or contact a service like Lifeline. Cite this episodeMacDonald, J. B. (Host). (2021, June 13). Education and training of future psychologists with Dr Elly Quinlan (No. 1) [Audio podcast episode]. In Psych Attack. www.psychattack.comAcknowledgementsThe transcript for this episode was developed by Eugenie Dale.
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store