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On Saturday, Biden signed legislation designed to prevent people convicted of domestic abuse from owning a gun and increase the prevalence of state "red flag" laws.The new law comes just days after the Supreme Court's conservative majority ruled there is a constitutional right to carry a handgun in public for self-defense, striking down a long-standing New York law that restricted concealed carry.This episode: congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, WNYC reporter Jon Campbell, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In a 6-3 vote along partisan lines, the Supreme Court's conservative majority has overturned Roe v. Wade, the 50-year-old case that was the basis for legal abortion across the United States. The result: a split national landscape, with states free to enforce laws prohibiting abortion.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, national correspondent Sarah McCammon, demographics and culture correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Top Trump-era Justice officials, including acting attorney general Jeffrey Rosen, testified about the former president's push to have the Justice Department substantiate his election fraud claims. He came very close to firing the officials who stood in his way and installing one who would not.And a number of Republicans who supported Trump's efforts to subvert the Democratic process asked the president for pardons, according to the testimony of administration aides. This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In Nashville last week, Christian conservatives echoed Trump's claims about fraud after his speech at their conference. In Texas, the state GOP incorporated the idea that the 2020 presidential election was fraudulent into the party's new platform.Sharply-partisan districts and an ever-more polarized public have drawn lawmakers like Rep. Elise Stefanik, once known for her moderate politics, to publicly promote the former president's attacks on the American democratic process. This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, political correspondent Susan Davis, political reporter Ashley Lopez, and North Country Public radio reporter Zach Hirsch.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The officials who appeared before the Jan. 6 committee were Arizona House Speaker Rusty Bowers, Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and his chief operating officer Gabriel Sterling — all Republicans who indicated then-President Trump pushed them to violate their obligations to the Constitution.The committee also heard from Shaye Moss, a former staff election worker in Georgia who was targeted by Trump and his allies over baseless conspiracy theories about election fraud. She left her job as racist attacks and threats against her safety mounted.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, and Georgia Public Broadcasting's Stephen Fowler.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
A special episode from our friends at Code Switch:In the wake of violence and tragedies, people are often left in search of ways to feel safe again. That almost inevitably to conversations about the role of police. On today's episode, we're talking to the author and sociologist Alex Vitale, who argues that many spaces in U.S. society over-rely on the police to prevent problems that are better addressed through other means. Doing so, he says, can prevent us from properly investing in resources and programs that could make the country safer in the long run.Subscribe: https://www.npr.org/podcasts/510312/codeswitchThis episode was fact-checked by Alyssa Jeong Perry and Christina Cala. Summer Thomad, Alyssa Jeong Perry, Diba Mohtasham and Christina Cala contributed to the production.
Take our survey: https://www.npr.org/podcastsurveyGinni Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, reportedly said she'd be willing to speak to the committee following reporting by the Washington Post that Thomas was communicating with a Trump legal adviser at the heart of the probe.And the Federal Reserve escalated its battle against inflation Wednesday, announcing the largest interest rate hike in 28 years as the central bank struggles to regain control over soaring prices.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley, and voting reporter Miles Parks.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The committee centered its third hearing around one person in particular: former Vice President Mike Pence, honing in on the pressure put on him by former President Trump to overturn the 2020 election. Republican Congresswoman Liz Cheney began the hearing by saying: "What the president wanted the vice president to do was not just wrong. It was illegal and unconstitutional." The hearing featured live testimony from two Pence legal advisors, Greg Jacob and retired fourth circuit judge Michael Luttig.Read more: https://www.npr.org/1105513685This episode: Voting correspondent Miles Parks, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Ahead of those elections, NPR held discussions with Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) voters in the Nevada about their concerns and priorities ahead of the midterms, ranging from the cost of living to gun violence.Then, a look at what Congress is doing to address gun violence in the wake of mass shootings in Buffalo, N.Y., and Uvalde, Texas, and whether any legislation has a chance of passing.Read more: https://www.npr.org/1103894544This episode: congressional correspondents Kelsey Snell and Susan Davis, political correspondent Juana Summers and political reporter Barbara SpruntSupport the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
One theory: as polarization pushed policy-making out of Congress and toward states, divergent policies passed in red and blue-leaning states may have caused a big — and growing — gap in health outcomes.Read more: https://n.pr/3NUFJZrThis episode: political correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and health correspondent Allison Aubrey.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The second hearing into the Jan. 6 insurrection featured a slew of clips from top Trump aides from the campaign and administration testifying that the former president was repeatedly told that voter fraud claims were not true — but he continued to double-down, both publicly and privately.And senators came to a very narrow agreement on measures designed to curb gun violence.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Weekly Roundup: June 10

Weekly Roundup: June 10

2022-06-1028:092

The hearing documenting former President Trump's role in the January 6th riot was largely told through recorded clips. But Rep. Liz Cheney — a Republican from Wyoming and an ousted member of GOP leadership — also played a starring role. Why did she break with her Republican colleagues?And in California, progressive Democrats had setbacks in two high-profile elections — the LA mayoral primary and a recall election for the District Attorney in San Francisco.This episode: demographics and culture correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, and KQED reporter Marisa Lagos.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Rep. Liz Cheney, the committee's vice chair, summed up the hearing's thesis like this: "On this point, there is no room for debate: Those who invaded our Capitol and battled law enforcement for hours were motivated by what President Trump had told them."The hearing featured produced videos of the assault on the Capitol, recorded clips of interviews with insurrectionists and senior aides to Donald Trump, and live testimony from a Capitol police officer and a documentary filmmaker.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Trump voters largely remain enthusiastic about the former president and would considering voting for him again in 2024, but some had a hard time seeing past their affection for the conservative, incumbent politicians he was opposing when casting their primary ballots. That was great news for Georgia Republican Gov. Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, national political correspondent Don Gonyea, and national political correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The United States is hosting a major gathering of heads of state from the Americas, but some countries are upset President Biden has elected not to invite some leaders the White House described as "dictators." The move led other leaders to boycott — raising questions about whether the summit can effectively address pressing challenges like migration.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and international correspondent Carrie Kahn.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The Commerce Department is investigating whether China is skirting U.S. tariffs by routing solar panel parts through southeast Asian manufacturers — the biggest U.S. solar panel suppliers.That scared U.S. solar panel installers, who were worried the Commerce Department would impose retroactive fees on projects built during the investigation. Forecasts for new solar energy fell by almost half.On Monday, President Biden intervened by granting a two-year hiatus on the tariffs and invoking the Defense Production Act to spur domestic manufacturing of climate-friendly technologies including solar components.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The Labor Department said Friday that U.S. businesses added 390,000 jobs in May, as the unemployment rate held steady at a very low 3.6 percent and, despite rising prices, American continue to spend. Nevertheless, voters remain concerned about the economy and the White House is scrambling to find a convincing message.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley, demographics and culture correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben, and education correspondent Anya Kamenetz.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Despite bipartisan efforts at a modest deal, Senate Republicans could filibuster any gun control measures that are brought to a vote. That would increase the amount of support needed to pass legislation and imperil its passage. In his speech, Biden noted that guns are the number one cause of death for American children.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The conservative majority so far appears unmoved by prevailing public opinion on the controversial social issues before them this term, though they have been notably slow to issue final opinions. That will make for a busy few weeks of rulings as the Supreme Court races to conclude its term by the middle of the summer.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
And President Biden and first lady Jill Biden visited with victims and their families in Texas on Sunday. The White House is considering more executive actions on guns, though substantial reform would require congressional action — something that remains very unlikely despite ongoing negotiations.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Comments (615)

Son of Ghazi (Ben Ghazi)

Libs should join the Libertarian party, it's in the name :)

Jun 23rd
Reply (1)

கார்கால சங்கடங்கள்

Jan 6th was an attack by robots controlled by the Dönmeh, which was confirmed by the MSM. LIEdon and Cackala have also been replaced by body doubles, which is an increasingly obvious pattern in the NWO scheme. Republicans have also been replaced, how else do you explain Donald Trumps behavior, the real Trump would not be pro Vaccine, as he keeps saying.

Jun 23rd
Reply

squogg

This is absolutely fascinating!

Jun 15th
Reply

CPSTest BL

Former Attorney General Bill Barr said he became "demoralized" when discussing allegations of voting fraud tied to Dominion voting machines with former President Donald Trump because Trump had "become detached from reality if he really believes this stuff." click here to find out more https://clickspersecondtest.com/

Jun 14th
Reply

Көзіңді аш

Trump is still the most powerful man in the solar system, one only has to look at his angelic features to see he is not of this earth. The LEFTISTS want you to believe that he doesn't care about the common man, but that's only because he has difficulty understanding Homo Sapien emotions. Get educated plebs.

Jun 13th
Reply

Көзіңді аш

It's an undisputed FACT that LIEdon utilized robot humanoids to attack the capital, you can see in the footage some of them break down, some of them perform feats of inhuman strength. Do not use 5G, it has an interface with the Federal supercomputers. Get educated minimum wage trash, get educated.

Jun 13th
Reply

Көзіңді аш

What Marxist/Antifa/Liedon doesn't want you to know is that all of America's population are being kept in saline solution pods, being kept alive through stem cells. Only Q and Donald Trump can see the granular edges of the simulation. I am not being metaphorical, although mouthbreathing insipid trolls will attempt to cast doubt on this real truth. We are not really doing anything, we are floating in pods in a government warehouse. America's population is only about 300,000 while the rest are staged programs. Awaken children, for this is a dream.t

Jun 6th
Reply

Cody Buttron

Either justice prevails and the system crumbles or justice fails and the system crumbles.

Jun 2nd
Reply

D Fiala

Such rank, disingenuous nonsense. None of this is a fucking mystery if you aren't an idiot or a liar

May 6th
Reply

Tom Rooney

Which part of ''the federal government has no constitutional power to tell states that they must allow abortion'' does the malthusian Left not understand?

May 4th
Reply

Elliot Daly

"a lot to unpack here" doesnt even begin to describe the contents of this episode lol

Apr 22nd
Reply

Cody Buttron

Would also allow all religions to do this, or just Christians? I sure the church of Satan will have fun with this.

Apr 21st
Reply

Maureen Manning

I love SEX and I love to SUCK my photos 🔞 bio http://top.porked.me/MaureenManning

Apr 8th
Reply

an interested party

WHATT!!!! commercials selling products can't tell a lie about their products but politicians selling themselves can lie out there @#$! who makes these rules? And how do we stop them?

Apr 3rd
Reply

Cody Buttron

As long a the curriculum is approved by the department of vice and virtue you will be allowed to learn it... wait we're talking about the Taliban right?

Mar 30th
Reply

Alvin Burstein

business t

Mar 21st
Reply

Pætrïck Lėő Dåvīd

what about when Poland goes?

Mar 17th
Reply

rshackleford53

These people are disgusting propagandists.

Mar 8th
Reply (16)

kade estill

You just lost a listener, and you're as corrupt as the left NPR. So much shit going on in the world and you post this garbage and you have nothing to support it. FUCK THE ELITE. Fuck the deep state

Mar 5th
Reply (2)

Cody Buttron

I had an idea about this the other day. I wonder if if it would be possible to create a pandemic mobile emergency quatine mask. This would look like a open glass diving mask connected to an airfilter and purification device that can also capture samples of breath to test for infections, if detected alerting the user to seek medical help. Now place these at border crossings, airports and other terminals of migration just hang on wall chagers like a life vest on a boat. If the WHO issues a high threat of a new outbreak people could voluntarily dawn the masks as they continue to move around the world without fear of spreading it unknowingly, slowing it down enough to possibly isolate and eliminate.

Mar 3rd
Reply
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