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The NPR Politics Podcast

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Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.
621 Episodes
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Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday about his investigation into origin of the FBI's probe of the 2016 Trump campaign. His report, unveiled on Monday, substantiates Republican claims of numerous process issues within the bureau, though finds no evidence that the start of the probe was politically motivated.On the other side of the Capitol Building, the House Judiciary Committee will hold hearings on Wednesday night and Thursday to finalize the text of the two articles of impeachment against President Trump, ahead of a full House vote likely next week. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and Justice department correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Polititics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
House Democrats officially unveiled two articles of impeachment against President Trump at a press conference on Tuesday morning: abuse of power in the Ukraine affair and obstruction of Congress. The scope of the charges, which make only a passing reference to special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference, reveals the sway of Democrats' moderate members in shaping the impeachment process.Within hours of that announcement, Democratic leaders convened a second press conference, this time to unveil a deal with the White House on the United States-Mexico-Canada trade agreement — a major legislative priority for many moderates in the Democratic caucus.This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In a hearing summarizing the findings of the impeachment inquiry so far, Democrats said they believe the case for removing President Trump from office is clear.And in a report released Monday afternoon, Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz found that the department's Russia investigation was "properly" predicated and conducted without political bias — but there were numerous problems with the surveillance of a junior campaign aide to Donald Trump.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, election security editor Phil Ewing, and National Political correspondent Mara Liasson.
Now that Speaker Pelosi has announced that the House will draft articles of impeachment, Democrats must decide how wide or narrow those articles will be. Plus, what does all the drama at the NATO summit say about the United States on the world stage? This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara, Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, Congressional editor Deirdre Walsh, and senior political editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The Democratic Party faces the prospect of a debate in two weeks with only white candidates onstage. Earlier, they had the most diverse presidential candidate field in history. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, political correspondent Asma Khalid, and political reporter Juana Summers.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
A panel of four constitutional law scholars are trying to put the allegations against Trump in a historical and legal context. Three of the professors support impeachment, one is opposed. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, national security editor Phil Ewing, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee unveiled the report summarizing their case for impeachment on Tuesday. Plus, California Sen. Kamala Harris is dropping out of the presidential race, citing a lack of funds. This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, political correspondent Scott Detrow, national security editor Phil Ewing, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff will reveal his findings in the impeachment probe, and the House Judiciary plans a hearing with experts on constitutional grounds for impeachment. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Tim Mak, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
How To Run For Office

How To Run For Office

2019-11-2900:15:4912

In this special collaboration with NPR's Life Kit the NPR Politics team breaks down what are key steps for running for office. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political reporter Miles Parks, and editor & correspondent Ron Elving. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
How To Vote In An Election

How To Vote In An Election

2019-11-2800:14:304

In this special collaboration with NPR's Life Kit the NPR Politics team breaks down how to get ready for election day. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political reporter Miles Parks, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
How To Spot Misinformation

How To Spot Misinformation

2019-11-2700:14:0514

In this special collaboration with NPR's Life Kit the NPR Politics team breaks down what misinformation is and how you can spot it. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political reporter Miles Parks, and national security editor Philip Ewing. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Bloomberg announced his candidacy for the Democratic nomination, saying Trump "represents an existential threat to our country and our values." The businessman is a late entrant to a crowded field. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political correspondent Scott Detrow, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
President Trump has repeatedly intervened on behalf of the Navy SEAL recently convicted of misconduct. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, Election Security editor Phil Ewing, and National Political correspondent Mara Liasson. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
After a full week jam-packed with impeachment inquiry hearings we look back at the major moments that shaped what will happen next. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspodent Franco Ordoñez, Congressional correspondent Claudia Grisales, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In what may be the final day of public hearings, members of Congress heard from a former White House policy insider and a foreign service officer who said he overheard a call with President Trump. In this episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The big question of the night was whether or not Mayor Pete Buttigieg would take heat from other candidates after rising in the polls in Iowa. After discussion about policies that haven't received much attention at previous debates, the attacks came. In this episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, political correspondent Asma Khalid, political reporter Juana Summers, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, tied President Trump directly to conditioning a meeting with the Ukrainian president with "a public statement from President Zelenskiy committing to investigations of Burisma and the 2016 election." In this episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and Justice department correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Four witnesses testified in the impeachment hearing. The first two were the first to testify with firsthand knowledge of the president's phone call with the Ukrainian president. The second two were called by Republicans to support their claims. In this episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and national security editor Phil Ewing.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
More hearings in the impeachment hearing are slated for Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday of this week. The cast breaks down what to watch for each day. Plus, the democratic candidates face-off for the fifth time on the debate stage Wednesday night. In this episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, national security editor Phil Ewing, and political correspondent Scott Detrow.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch described a pressure campaign to oust her from Kyiv. President Trump tweeted negatively about her during her hearing; Rep. Adam Schiff called it "witness intimidation." Plus, two 2020 candidates throw their name into the ring. In this episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondent Asma Khalid, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
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Comments (290)

Mark Larson

This was "conducted without political bias"? From a guy who is a Democrat puppet? This podcast is just another Democrat platform. Biased and fake.

Dec 11th
Reply (1)

Kyle Smith

Maybe Harris is out cuz she had trash talking points and got shut down by other candidates and didn’t do anything but talk smack about Trump. There’s Yang and Gabbard left who are both minorities, yet never get talked about.

Dec 10th
Reply

Redi Spades

Looks like y'all got the scoop wrong, yet again. What are the odds that you will issue an retraction? https://youtu.be/0hcPxE523pw

Dec 7th
Reply

William M Westcott

If Harris wanted to be the first black female president she should’ve shown like at least a little bit of substance. What ideas did she bring to the table?

Dec 6th
Reply

Kaitlin

hey, maybe talk more about Andrew Yang who is the only person of color left in the top five according to the economist’s poll.

Dec 6th
Reply (1)

Tod Lazarov

Why are you guys turning into the any other crappy media and clearly ignore the fact Bernie is a serious candidate and only talk about the other Democratic candidates, including many that have. absolutely no chance?

Dec 6th
Reply

Liz Williams

lose the Lexus ads, please. they play audio over top of the podcast.

Nov 29th
Reply (1)

Sandra Norris

Election Day should still be a holiday or on the weekend. We should still try to help more people vote even if it doesn't impact everyone. 🤷🏾‍♀️

Nov 29th
Reply (1)

Redi Spades

Republicans are not saying Russia didn't interfere, we are just saying that Trump didn't work with Russia on said interference. And that doesn't mean that Ukraine also didn't interfere, two things can be true at once. And the more establishment people proclaim there was no interference, the more it makes me want am actual investigation into it because it seems like there is something to hide. We spent 3 years looking into Russia, why can't we do an investigation into Ukraine?

Nov 27th
Reply

opqrsguy

um 😋 jk thanks for this

Nov 26th
Reply

Diana H

Hilarious intro!

Nov 21st
Reply (1)

Ruth Gordon

Good summary 👍

Nov 20th
Reply

Redi Spades

I laughed at the attempted framing of intimidation. Schiff totally planted that idea and if you think someone saying that you are bad at your job is intimidation, can I just invite you to come back to reality? For the last 3 years, Democrats have tried everything to void the last election and obstruct a duly elected president. That woman complaining about her lost job had nothing to do with Quid Pro Quo, but here you are, covering it as Orange Man Bad. What a joke.

Nov 17th
Reply (15)

Amber Shelton

No more Christmas music, respect the Thanksgiving holiday. 🙄🤭

Nov 15th
Reply (1)

Redi Spades

How many bombshells are the media going to predict only to see there really isn't one? Here is a more unbiased approach about how the media is trying to make a story out of impeachment when there really isn't one: https://youtu.be/VPQ2UJsY124

Nov 15th
Reply (2)

Redi Spades

Republicans aren't saying that because Quid Pro Quo didn't happen, that proves he is innocent. They are saying that this is a crime of motive, where you have to prove the intent of President Trump. And the fact that there wasn't a carryout of an investigation in exchange for military aid is partial evidence that the speculation given by some of the "witnesses*" so far. Republicans are not trying to discredit the witnesses (something that NPR has tried to frame multiple times) but to discredit the motives of the Democrats running the investigation. This is not an honest investigation to preserve the office of the presidency. It is a political ploy to smear the president before the election of 2020. *I say witnesses, but so far it is just people who heard opinions of those who might have heard it directly from the president.

Nov 14th
Reply

JustAGuy

I have a question that feels ethical in nature. If this situation, in which the President inquired about potential corruption, did not include the family of a career politician that happens to be running for President, would what the President did be seen as an impeachable crime? If the answer is no, and I believe that is the correct answer, then why would this family receive this perceived immunity just because of a Presidential race? Should we still not investigate the injustice?

Nov 14th
Reply (17)

Mouseysmack

get this bullshit off my notifications

Nov 14th
Reply (1)

Redi Spades

As a Republican, I can say that our point was misrepresented on this episode. Most of us believe there was a Quid Pro Quo, Trump can't say that because he knows it will be misrepresented, as many who are reading what I just said incorrectly. It wasn't a Quid Pro Quo against a political opponent, it was a Quid Pro Quo against corruption. We know that there were corrupt entities in Ukraine that played a role in the 2016 election. We have evidence that they were working with the Clinton campaign.

Nov 13th
Reply

Redi Spades

"The more people know about computers, the less you want computers to run the vote" Yeah, when that was said, I knew that guy had no clue what he was talking about. Sure, security is an issue. But everything else they mention has a work around.

Nov 12th
Reply (3)
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