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The NPR Politics Podcast

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Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.
676 Episodes
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Attorney General William Barr asked President Trump to stop his social media commentary on Thursday after the flap over the case involving Trump's adviser Roger Stone. The next day Trump tweeted in response.Plus, with impeachment over Democrats and Republicans in Congress map out what future investigations may look like. This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, political reporter Tim Mak, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and Senior Political Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Joe Biden's theory of the case is that his current support among black voters will lead to success in Nevada and South Carolina. That, in turn, he hopes will propel him to victory in the Super Tuesday contests in early March.Michael Bloomberg, along with other candidates, hope to earn the support of black voters and erode Biden's base. For Bloomberg, his past remarks about black men and crime, "stop-and-frisk" policing, and housing discrimination could make that difficult.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, demographics and culture correspondent Juana Summers, and national political correspondent Don Gonyea.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Hours after the Justice Department intervened to seek a shorter sentence for Roger Stone, the four federal prosecutors who secured his conviction withdrew from the case.Stone was convicted in November on charges of lying to Congress, obstructing its investigation and witness tampering. Judge Amy Berman Jackson has the ultimate authority to hand down the sentence in his case.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, Justice Department correspondent Ryan Lucas, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.More from the NPR Politics Team:Scott Detrow on Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast, talking about where leading Democratic presidential contenders stand on climate policy.Danielle Kurtzleben on NPR's Throughline, discussing the history of women running for president of the United States.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has narrowly won the New Hampshire Democratic primary, as moderate voters split their voters between other candidates.Former South Bend, Ind., mayor Pete Buttigieg and Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar both had strong showings in New Hampshire. The state's electorate is considerably older and whiter than that of the nearly all of the remaining contests. Despite this result, both candidates face an uphill climb to the nomination because of a dearth of support from voters of color.Former Vice President Joe Biden and Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren both under-performed expectations. Neither secured any delegates in the state, with their vote totals falling below the necessary 15 percent threshold.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis and campaign correspondents Asma Khalid and Scott Detrow.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
On the Ground In New Hampshire

On the Ground In New Hampshire

2020-02-1000:23:1614

In this special episode of The NPR Politics Podcast, Asma Khalid travels to candidate events around the state of New Hampshire and speaks with reporters from NPR and New Hampshire Public Radio about the themes of the race days before the first-in-the-nation primary.This episode: NPR correspondents Asma Khalid, Scott Detrow, and Mara Liasson; New Hampshire Public Radio reporters Lauren Choolijian, Sarah Gibson, and Casey McDermott. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
At the end of a busy week in American politics, seven Democrats took the stage in New Hampshire ahead of the state's Tuesday primary.Each candidate made the case for his or her own electability in a still-crowded field, a topic that remains top of mind for Democratic voters after a chaotic caucus in Iowa. In particular, they spoke at length about how their platforms would help Americans of color.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and campaign correspondents Scott Detrow and Asma Khalid.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The impeachment trial is over, but there are still hard feelings between President Trump and Democratic leadership. Those tensions were on display today at the National Prayer Breakfast, during House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's weekly press conference and at President Trump's White House address on acquittal. This episode: Congressional correspondents Susan Davis and Kelsey Snell, and White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Senators voted mostly along party lines this afternoon to acquit President Trump on two articles of impeachment. The White House called President Trump's acquittal a "full vindication and exoneration." But in a surprise decision, Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, joined Democrats to vote "guilty" on Article I.This episode, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
It was a highly partisan event. Trump touted his own accomplishments on issues like the economy and paid family leave, lowering the cost of health care, immigration and national security.It was punctuated by made-for-TV moments, including a surprise appearance by a soldier as his family was recognized for their sacrifice.Republicans present gave Trump repeated, resounding applause. After the conclusion of the remarks, Nancy Pelosi ripped up a copy of Trump's speech.This episode, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., is neck and neck with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in the Iowa caucuses, according to a partial release of results from the state Democratic Party. Even without final totals out of Iowa, candidates are looking towards New Hampshire where the first primary will be held in just one week. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Juana Summers, and senior editor and political correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
As problems with a mobile app through which vote tallies were transmitted electronically caused a delay in the reporting of Iowa caucus results on Monday night, Democratic candidates seized the moment to fire up their supporters.Several Democratic contenders delivered what sounded like victory speeches, even though state officials have not yet released vote totals.It is unclear when officials plan on announcing the results.This episode: White House Correspondent Tamara Keith, election security and voting reporter Miles Parks, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The White House legal team and House managers made their closing arguments today in the Senate impeachment trial. With an acquittal looking almost certain after Friday's vote against witnesses and evidence, House managers asked Senators how they want their legacy remembered while the White House defense said to let the voters decide. All of this happened as Iowans prepare to caucus tonight, kicking off voting in the presidential primary. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and Congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In this special episode of the NPR Politics Podcast, Scott Detrow travels to candidate events around the state of Iowa days and speaks with our campaign reporters about the themes of the race in the days before the first-in-the-nation caucus.This episode: campaign correspondents Scott Detrow and Asma Khalid, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
This is a special episode, recorded in front of a live audience at Hoyt Sherman Place in Des Moines, IA on Friday, January 31. The cast breaks down everything you need to know about the upcoming Iowa caucuses and how impeachment is affecting the race. This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro and IPR's lead political reporter Clay Masters. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The Senate adjourned for the weekend, but the impeachment trial of President Trump is not over. Senators voted not to hear from new witnesses on Friday — a move Minority Leader Chuck Schumer called it a "grand tragedy." This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional editor Deirdre Walsh, and Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell.
Close to a vote on whether to include witnesses, the White House legal team continued to defend its argument that the president sometimes has authority to ask foreign powers to investigate political rivals in the name of public interest.
The point was made by Alan Dershowitz, one of the president's attorneys: "If a president does something which he believes will help him get elected in the public interest, that cannot be the kind of quid pro quo that results in impeachment."Asked to respond, Impeachment Manager Adam Schiff was incredulous. "All quid pro quos are fine, it's carte blanche?" Schiff asked. "Is that really what we're prepared to say?"The question of whether witnesses will be included in the trail remains open. While Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told Republicans on Tuesday that he didn't have to votes to block witnesses, Democrats still may not have enough support to subpoena former national security adviser John Bolton. Bolton reportedly claims in a forthcoming book that President Trump conditioned aid to Ukraine on an investigation that would likely benefit his reelection bid.This episode: White House correspondents Tamara Keith and Franco Ordoñez, and political reporter Tim Mak.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
President Trump's impeachment defense team concluded their arguments with time to spare Tuesday. White House counsel Pat Cipollone said the two articles of impeachment — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — "fall far short of any constitutional standard."Democrats continue to push for an agreement on witnesses; in particular, they hope to hear from former national security adviser John Bolton. According to a report in the New York Times, Bolton alleges in a forthcoming book that President Trump expressly linked aid to Ukraine to investigations into family of former Vice President Joe Biden.The impeachment trial will resume tomorrow afternoon, the beginning of a two-day question-and-answer period.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and congressional correspondents Susan Davis and Kelsey Snell.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
As President Trump's legal team continues their case for acquittal, a report in The New York Times about an alleged conversation between Trump and Bolton — contained in a draft of the former national security adviser's book manuscript — could change the equation for some senators who are undecided on calling witnesses.And, Joe Biden and Rudy Giuliani were both discussed at length today as the president's lawyers attempt to reframe and undercut the arguments made by Democratic House impeachment managers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
President Trump "did absolutely nothing wrong," White House counsel Pat Cipollone said Saturday, as lawyers representing the president got their first shot to poke holes in the impeachment case made this week by Democrats.Saturday's proceedings, which lasted a little more than two hours, set up the White House arguments in the impeachment trial. The president's team told senators that the House managers selectively withheld evidence in their arguments against the president.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
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Comments (357)

Happy New Year's!

I feel like in essence this man was arrested for resisting arrest.

Feb 13th
Reply

Dre

Interesting that they never even mentioned one of the most talked about racial conversations on that stage that night. Elizabeth Warren’s response to Pete’s mayoral arrest record in Indiana. Like come on, guys! Quit being sexist and only talking about the white guys on the stage.

Feb 10th
Reply

Kyle Deg

When I heard Andrew Yang wanted a basic minimum income, I already knew he would never win. That's the dumbest selling point i've ever heard

Feb 9th
Reply

yakurbe 0112

"Things might have changed by the time you hear this; Like who has won the Iowa caucuses!" Ha!

Feb 5th
Reply

alli lent

the lack of Andrew Yang coverage is seriously starting to piss me off

Feb 2nd
Reply

A H

Trump 2020

Jan 30th
Reply

Matt Huisenga

The My Pillow guy is a campaign surrogate for the President's reelection. I just want everyone to know that this is the kind of world we live in

Jan 28th
Reply (2)

Tony Zac

haha... thank you for sending journalists that are informed and educated that can combat bullies that try to suppress the people that want to learn more.

Jan 27th
Reply

Redi Spades

Elizabeth Warren has a track record of claiming victimhood status only to be called out on it later on and proven wrong. The biggest example is when she claimed she was fired from a job because she was pregnant. Not only do we have the records disproving that, we even have her on camera many years ago countering this claim.

Jan 24th
Reply

Klintorious

#Trump2020LandslideVictory

Jan 19th
Reply

Blaire Marsolan

I love this podcast!

Jan 15th
Reply (1)

alli lent

#AmericaNeedsYang

Jan 15th
Reply

Matt Huisenga

I miss Yangdrew

Jan 15th
Reply

Greg Moore

This podcast keeps skipping back in the recording for some reason.

Jan 14th
Reply

Samoneh Noohi

Of course, General Suleimani was the really bad guy FOR Americans, because HE was FIGHTING the terrorists.

Jan 9th
Reply

Redi Spades

How many times has the Republicans called out Trump for his words? Many. I was one of those who refused to vote for him in 2016. I have criticized him many times. But then I hear the disdain for Republicans in podcasts like these as you all lump all Republicans into one that gives a pass to Trump. That just isn't true. But we do see that happening on the Democrat side. Ilhan Ohmar made blatant anti-Semitic remarks and you all brushed it under the rug. Katie Hill was turned into a victim despite the gross ethic violations she did. Ralph Northam is seen in a photo with blackface and a KKK costume, and he is still there. The disdain of Mara Liasson toward Republicans in this was overwhelming evident, and that is why Republicans don't want to side with you. It isn't because we like Trump so much, it is that we are sick and tires of being smeared up and down for our faults while your faults always seems to be ignored and down played. What has been the biggest political event of the decade? The constant onslaught for our differing ideologies. We disagree, but the Dems smear and we are done with that. This whole podcast was just an attack on Republicans for the past decade while ignoring the gross errors that the Democrats did.

Jan 8th
Reply

Redi Spades

Great view at her life, now do one like this for a conservative

Jan 8th
Reply (1)

Cooper Freeman

news is not news when the narrator is trying trying to persuade you with adjectives (slammed horrific )

Jan 6th
Reply

Vitor Manoel

já ouviram o podcast conheça-te?

Jan 4th
Reply

David Bradley

how come no one says how much of big babies the democribabies are ...there like 2 year olds

Jan 1st
Reply (1)
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