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Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly  podcast. I am your host Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. This week, we have 2 really interesting interviews about very different topics. I will start with the second interview. The 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, was held 3 -7 June 2022 in Chicago, IL. One of the most covered topics talked in the hallways and you may have read in newspapers, was about precision treatment in aggressive breast cancer.  It all started 24 years ago, when a drug called Herceptin changed how doctors treat breast cancer. Its approval in 1998 made it possible to target the aggressive breast tumors tied to a gene called HER2. Other drugs quickly followed Herceptin and, over the years since, have substantially improved survival for people with the disease.A quarter of a century later, another shift in treatment could be on the horizon. At the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting, researchers presented results proving that, for the first time, a targeted medicine, called trastuzumab deruxtecan (or T-Dxd for short) can help metastatic breast cancer patients whose tumors express only low levels of HER2. Because many more patients may soon be eligible for treatment with T-Dxd, we focused on a safety follow-up analysis of the randomized phase 3 DESTINY-Breast03 study reinforced the risk-benefit profile of trastuzumab deruxtecan compared with trastuzumab emtansine in patients with HER2-positive unresectable or metastatic breast cancer.  We speak with Prof. Guiseppe Curigliano (University of Milan, Italy) to learn the latest results. But first, we speak with Sonya M. Sloan, MD, better known as #OrthoDoc, has established herself as a force to be reckoned with in the male-dominated field of Orthopedic Surgery. Licensed to practice medicine in several states, she travels the country as a locum tenens physician. There’s a shortage of doctors in America, and all types of facilities need locum tenens providers to relieve physician burnout, maintain patient satisfaction, and stay fully staffed during busy times, or while searching for a permanent doctor. Furthermore, locum tenens helps more people see a provider and receive care, offsetting the physician shortage in underserved areas—especially rural communities, urban areas with health professional shortages, VA hospitals, and Indian Health Service facilities. A 2021 survey indicated that 72% of healthcare facility managers are seeking locum tenens physicians. This is up from 47% in 2016 and up from 39% in 2012. Physician’s Weekly senior editor Martta Kelly interviews Dr. Sloan.  Dr. Sloan is the author of  a book titled The Rules of Medicine: A Medical Professionals Guide to Success   Extra reading:  Modi S, Jacot W, Yamashita T, Sohn J, Vidal M, Tokunaga E, Tsurutani J, Ueno NT, Prat A, Chae YS, Lee KS, Niikura N, Park YH, Xu B, Wang X, Gil-Gil M, Li W, Pierga JY, Im SA, Moore HCF, Rugo HS, Yerushalmi R, Zagouri F, Gombos A, Kim SB, Liu Q, Luo T, Saura C, Schmid P, Sun T, Gambhire D, Yung L, Wang Y, Singh J, Vitazka P, Meinhardt G, Harbeck N, Cameron DA. Trastuzumab Deruxtecan in Previously Treated HER2-Low Advanced Breast Cancer. N Engl J Med. 2022 Jun 5. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2203690. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35665782.
In this episode, we focus on the clinical value of gene expression profiling tests to analyze a number of different genes in breast cancer cells to predict the risk of cancer recurrence, and to provide insight into the biological natural history of the individual tumor. The results of gene expression profiling tests can help determine who may benefit from adjuvant treatment after surgery.Notably, this year is the 20th anniversary of the 2 seminal papers which showed that gene expression could predict clinical outcomes for breast cancer patients. That 70-gene signature, which later became Mammaprint, was published first in Nature, and then followed up a few months later with survival data in a publication in the New England Journal of Medicine. Today we speak with the first author of the most recent New England Journal of Medicine paper, from 2016, demonstrating the clinical value of MammaPrint as a decision aid for early breast cancer, Dr. Fatima Cardoso (Director Breast Unit Champalimaud Clinical Center Lisbon, Portugal). This result from the MINDACT study was followed up in a 2021 Lancet Oncology publication, which provided level 1 evidence of the validity of that 70-gene signature. We also interview Dr. William Audeh (Chief Medical Officer at Agendia BV, CA) to discuss the implications of the MINDACT trial and the added value of the genomic profiling tools MammaPrint and Blueprint. Dr. Audeh also touches upon the FLEX study, which provides whole transcriptome data linked with a clinical database annotated with over 800 clinical characteristics, over 90 sites in USA and > 9K patients enrolled with the ambition to enroll 30K. We also touch upon new data from the I-SPY trial, which indicates that within the high-risk region, there is also information to be gained by stratifying patients into High Risk 1 and 2 categories. Enjoy listening!
March is National Kidney Month, which brings awareness to kidney health, which in turn is a global public health burden. For this last episode of Physician’s Weekly podcast this March of 2022, we wanted to highlight a recent publication about the use of diuretics in patients with chronic kidney disease, or CKD, with a prevalence of 11% in the USA . Diuretics are useful in the management of most patients with CKD because they reduce ECF volume; lower blood pressure; potentiate the effects of ACE inhibitors, ARBs, and other antihypertensive agents; and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in CKD. Physician’s Weekly’s Senior Editor Martta Kelly interviews Dr. Alan S Go, of the Kaiser Permanente of Northern California, whose team looked at the effect of diuretics on renal outcomes among nearly 48K adults with chronic kidney disease. Loop and thiazide class diuretics are an important part of guideline-directed medical therapy for patients with CKD with hypertension, edema, metabolic acidosis and/or hyperkalemia. Yet diuretics can be also be associated with acute elevations in serum creatinine and electrolyte derangements. Whether diuretics result in direct kidney injury versus benign hemoconcentration of serum creatinine remains controversial, which was the rationale behind this large study. But first, March is also famous for MATCH DAY from the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Match Day is when domestic and international medical school students and graduates learn in which U.S. residency programs they will train. Naturally this is extremely important to the careers of all residents and it is coupled with high stress and anxiety, as well as questions about how best to prepare. Some recent participants set up a Resident-led platform, called Inside The Match, with information, help reviewing your applications, and a podcast series to provide everything you wanted to know about the residency match process but were too afraid to ask. Physician’s Weekly interviews psychiatry resident and co-founder Simone Bernstein, previously recognized as a social entrepreneur in Forbes’ 30 under 30 list. She is truly a mover and shaker!Enjoy listening!Additional reading:https://www.insidethematch.com/Fitzpatrick JK, Yang J, Ambrosy AP, Cabrera C, Stefansson BV, Greasley PJ, Patel J, Tan TC, Go AS. Loop and thiazide diuretic use and risk of chronic kidney disease progression: a multicentre observational cohort study. BMJ Open. 2022 Jan 31;12(1):e048755. 
Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast. My name is Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly.  This week’s episode has 2 in-depth interviews  with top-line specialists that we are pretty certain you will enjoy. Later in this episode, Physician’s Weekly speaks with Dr. Stephen Thomas, Director of the University of Maryland Center for Health Equity and  from the Health Advocates in Reach and Research (HAIR) program about  Building Trust, Styling Hair, Saving Lives. University of Maryland researchers and HAIR health advocates are part of a large and growing network of scientists, academics, barbers and other community advocates working to improve the health of vulnerable communities through the unique environments of Black barbershops and salons. Dr Thomas is an amazing storyteller and was so fascinating, that we gave him twice the amount of time we usually plan for our guests. I can almost guarantee this will be the best story you have heard today.But first, Physician’s Weekly’s Senior Editor Martta Kelly interviews Dr Randall M Clark. Dr. Clark is professor of anesthesiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado and a pediatric cardiac anesthesiologist at Children’s Hospital Colorado. He is also the current president of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), the nation’s largest organization of physician anesthesiologists. He talk about how a new (February 22, 2022) joint statement issued by the American Society of Anesthesiologists and the Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation (APSF) points to data that all elective surgical procedures should be delayed at least 7 weeks after COVID-19 infection in unvaccinated patients. What is the appropriate length of time between recovery from COVID-19 and surgery/procedure with respect to minimizing postoperative complications?Enjoy listening!
Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast. My name is Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly.  Although opioids relieve burn injury-related pain, they have serious adverse side effects. Prior studies have investigated alternative approaches to pain reduction in burn injury patients that focus on distraction, such as music, hypnosis, toys, and virtual reality. In this episode, Physician’s Weekly’s Senior Editor Martta Kelly interviews Dr. Thomas Delate, a research scientist at Kaiser Permanente, about his study on the value of telementoring services in educating prescribers about chronic pain management, including opioid prescriptions , recently published in Clinical Journal of Pain.Also in this episode, we speak with Dr., an Associate Professor of geriatric medicine at the University of Florida, about developments in dementia care in our ever-increasing aging population.But first, we speak with our regular expert contributor with the pseudonym Dr. Medlaw how physicians should approach expert witnesses as a defendant in a malpractice lawsuit. That’s it for this week’s podcast. Thanks for listening. Stay safe and stay healthy.  Gersch WD, Delate T, Bergquist KM, Smith K. Clinical Effectiveness of an Outpatient Multidisciplinary Chronic Pain Management Telementoring Service. Clin J Pain. 2021 Jul 12. doi: 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000967. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34265787. 
 Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast. My name is Dr. Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. There was a lot of interesting medical news this last week. Later in this episode, we interview Dr. Samer Al Hadidi, from Little Rock, Arkansas, who the lead author of a study about the lack of enrollment of African-American patients into trials in general, and here in particular, trials that were used to register the use of CAR-T cell therapies for the treatment of various hematological malignancies. He presents some interesting solutions that can be applicable to all trials.   Also in this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast, we speak to our regular contributor, who goes by the pseudonym, Dr. MedLaw all about what “Causality” means in the courtroom.  When is a doctor the cause of a medical problem, and what can be done about it?But first, Physician’s Weekly speaks with Dr. Eric Jonasch, from the University of Texas MD Anderson Hospital in Houston, about  the results of the his recently published New England Journal of Medicine article reporting the registrational data for a small molecule belzutifan in patients with the rare tumor syndrome von Hippel-Lindau disease, abbreviated as VHL. I have had the distinct honor of knowing hundreds of VHL patients over the last 20 years, and this study has truly become a landmark breakthrough for patients dealing with tumors in their kidneys, pancreas, adrenal glands, brain or spinal cord, eyes, endolymph sacs, epididymis, or broad ligament.  It was FDA approved in August 2021, and the patient  and medical VHL community is so relieved to have a systemic treatment finally.Enjoy listening! More reading:  Jonasch E, Donskov F, Iliopoulos O, Rathmell WK, Narayan VK, Maughan BL, Oudard S, Else T, Maranchie JK, Welsh SJ, Thamake S, Park EK, Perini RF, Linehan WM, Srinivasan R; MK-6482-004 Investigators. Belzutifan for Renal Cell Carcinoma in von Hippel-Lindau Disease. N Engl J Med. 2021 Nov 25;385(22):2036-2046. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2103425. PMID: 34818478. Al Hadidi S, Dongarwar D, Salihu HM, Kamble RT, Lulla P, Hill LC, Carrum G, Ramos CA, Heslop HE, Usmani SZ. Health disparities experienced by Black and Hispanic Americans with multiple myeloma in the United States: a population-based study. Leuk Lymphoma. 2021 Dec;62(13):3256-3263. doi: 10.1080/10428194.2021.1953013. Epub 2021 Jul 18. PMID: 34278937.
Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast. My name is Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. There was a lot of interesting medical news this last week. For example, there was the first transplant of a genetically modified pig heart into a human (the recipient was David Bennet Sr), and at the time of this recording he is still doing well. However, Mr Bennet’s criminal past stirred up ethical questions about who deserves access to the scarce supply of human organs in the US. There was also a paper published in the journal Science which garnered attention, after over 50 years of research, since the very first paper in 1972, which finally answered the question about whether infection with Epstien-Barr virus, or EBV, which causes mononucleosis, places people at a much higher risk of multiple sclerosis. The answer is yes, it puts people at a 34-fold higher risk, and to put that into perspective, smoking only puts people at <30-fold higher risk of lung cancer. Later in this episode, we interview the lead study author, Professor Alberto Ascherio, at Harvard University, and he describes how they had to screen 10 million young adults to prove that infection with EBV ALWAYS precedes MS. Also in this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast, we speak to our regular contributor, who goes by the pseudonym, Dr MedLaw about what “standard of care” means in the courtroom, and how clinical guidelines can be used.  But first, Physician’s Weekly speaks with Dr. Manali Kamdar, from the University of Colorado, about the results of the TRANSFORM study, which demonstrated that CAR T cells are an effective and safe therapy for the second line in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.  She presented the interim results as a Late-breaking abstract at the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting a few weeks ago. She does a great job introducing herself. Enjoy listening! More reading:  Bjornevik K, Cortese M, Healy BC, Kuhle J, Mina MJ, Leng Y, Elledge SJ, Niebuhr DW, Scher AI, Munger KL, Ascherio A. Longitudinal analysis reveals high prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus associated with multiple sclerosis. Science. 2022 Jan 21;375(6578):296-301.   
Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast. My name is Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. We have 3 fantastic in-depth interviews for you this week. Patients want to learn about medical errors that affect their health. Most physicians support error disclosure and believe they have an ethics obligation to disclose harmful errors to their patients or families, even if this disclosure comes at a personal or professional cost. However, in practice, physicians typically do not disclose harmful errors to patients. In a survey of U.S. physicians published in 2007, 320 (95%) of the 338 responding physicians indicated that they felt obligated to tell patients about such a mistake; however, only 41% of respondents reported that they had in practice disclosed minor harmful errors to their patients, while only 5% reported that they had disclosed major errors. Clearly, a discrepancy exists between physicians' desire to disclose and their practice of disclosing errors. In this episode of Physician’s Weekly, we speak to our regular contributor, who goes by the pseudonym, Dr MedLaw about which legal malpractice aspects should be considered when errors may have occurred, and when it is and is not appropriate to apologize.Also in this episode, we speak with Dr Shauna Newton, from Massachusetts General Hospital, about how in young adults between 20 and 39 years of age with high cholesterol levels, guidelines are simply not being met in a large multicenter study, and that there are some undefined elements for how to treat patients in this age group. She recently presented her results at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions.But first, Physician’s Weekly speaks with Dr Björn Meyer, in Germany, who is an expert in the in the development and evaluation of computer-based psychological treatments for various psychiatric and physical conditions, including randomized controlled trials of internet interventions. To date 4 of his team’s programs have shown clear clinical benefit in randomized controlled trials and are reimbursed by insurance in Germany. We talk about how this approach can really make a difference to closing gaps in access to care in traditionally underserved communities. He does a great job introducing himself. Enjoy listening!  
Roman Shinder, MD from the Department of Ophthalmology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in New York, on initial data at the 2021 Fall Scientific Symposium of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, held in New Orleans from November 11 to 12, 2021 looking at efficacy of teprotumumab as monotherapy for the treatment of dysthyroid optic neuropathy [1].Yuming Guo, MD PhD, Professor of Global Environmental health at Monash University, in Australia, about the link with global wildfires to human health, which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine and the Lancet Planet Health [2,3].Alexander Blood, MD, from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Massachusetts, the first author of the current study, about his presentation at the late-breaking session at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions held Nov 13-15, 2021 [4], on an ongoing remote digital care program to manage hypertension and hypercholesterolemia Further reading:1.      Artymowicz A, Shinder R. Teprotumumab as monotherapy for dysthyroid optic neuropathy. Poster presented at: American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery 2021 Annual Meeting; November 12-15, 2021; New Orleans, LA.2.      Xu R, Yu P, Abramson MJ, Johnston FH, Samet JM, Bell ML, Haines A, Ebi KL, Li S, Guo Y. Wildfires, Global Climate Change, and Human Health. N Engl J Med. 2020 Nov 26;383(22):2173-2181. 3.      Chen G, Guo Y, et al. Mortality risk attributable to wildfire-related PM2·5 pollution: a global time series study in 749 locations. Lancet Planet Health. 2021 Sep;5(9):e579-e5874.      Blood AJ, et al. Digital Care Transformation: Report from the First 10,000 Patients Enrolled in a Remote Algorithm-based Cardiovascular Risk Management Program to Improve Lipid and Hypertension Control. LBS02, AHA Scientific Sessions 2021, 13–15 November.
 Did you know? According to a report published by the WHO, adherence rates in developed countries average only about 50%, and there is little data about adherence in countries where access to care is more limited or consistent. Adherence is a key factor associated with the effectiveness of all pharmacological therapies but is particularly critical for medications prescribed for chronic conditions. Of all medication-related hospitalizations that occur in the United States, between one-third and two-thirds are the result of poor medication adherence. Inadequate adherence also is a major player in adverse events to medications. Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast. My name is Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. We have 3 fantastic in-depth interviews for you this week, touching on improved hospital workflow for stroke patients, a presentation on management of gout in dialysis patients, and medication experience. In this 31st episode of the Physician’s Weekly Podcast, we speak with Dr Danny Sands, about addressing barriers such as understanding their condition, cultural issues, and denial can help patients avoid adverse effects from poor medication adherence. Dr Sands is a primary care physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and is a founder and co-chair of the board of the Society for Participatory Medicine. In 2009 he was recognized by HealthLeaders Magazine as one of “20 People Who Make Healthcare Better.”Also in this episode, we speak with Dr Anthony Bleyer, Professor of nephrology at the Wake Forest School of Medicine, North Carolina, about his presentation of the results of a cohort study into the prevalence, risk factors and outcomes of gout in dialysis patients at the Kidney Week of the American Society of Nephrology, which was held virtually 4-7 November, 2021 [1].But first, Physician’s Weekly speaks with Ferdinand Hui, about workflow optimization and mobile technology. Dr. Hui hails from Johns Hopkins – but is currently working in Hawaii- and we talk about the deluge of communication apps in hospitals and what makes something valuable, versus noise. He recently published a paper in Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery [2] on the impact of mobile apps on treatment times for patients with stroke where time is of the essence. His team showed that that utilization of RapidAI mobile application can significantly reduce treatment times in stroke care by accelerating the process of mobilizing stroke clinicians and interventionalists.Enjoy listening!Further reading:1.      Bleyer AJ, et al. Risk Factors and Outcomes of Gout in Dialysis Patients: A Cohort Study of the United States Renal Data System (USRDS). PO0792, American Society of Nephrology: Kidney Week 2021, 04-07 November.2.      Murray NM, Unberath M, Hager GD, Hui FK. Artificial intelligence to diagnose ischemic stroke and identify large vessel occlusions: a systematic review. J Neurointerv Surg. 2020 Feb;12(2):156-164. 
Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast. My name is Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. We have 3 fantastic in-depth interviews for you this week. In this 30th episode of the Physician’s Weekly Podcast, we speak with Dr Raman Muthsamy from UCLA, about a surgery-free and medicine-free approach to treat gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD), called transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) which can have durable results. Also in this episode, we speak with our regular contributor who goes by the pseudonym Dr MedLaw, about what a “jury of peers” might mean for a doctor testifying. As she points out, it will be unlikely that there will be anyone with medical knowledge on that jury, so what then?But first, Physician’s Weekly speaks with Dr Rupert Bartsch from Vienna, Austria about their recently presented research in treating brain metastases in HER2-positive breast cancer with antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab deruxtecan. This is our last segment on breast cancer in recognition of October being Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Enjoy listening!
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, apart from skin cancers. According to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc., about 1 in 8 American women will experience this cancer in their lives. Breast cancer is an incredibly difficult disease to fight or to watch a loved one go through. Raising awareness of the scope and seriousness of this disease is one of the most important and impactful functions of breast cancer events and promotional items. Fundraising events, such as walks and fun runs, have become a common way to raise awareness about this issue and financially support the people and families who have been affected by this disease. Individuals as well as nonprofit organizations like the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation and Breastcancer.org have taken it upon themselves to earn money for breast cancer research. One of the slogans often used is, Breast Cancer Awareness Is Not Just a Month. Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast. My name is Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. We have 3 fantastic in-depth interviews for you this week. Later in this podcast, Physician’s Weekly’s Senior Editor Martta Kelly interviews Dr John Barbieri , Dermatologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston about cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. We know that patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality, but are less likely to have traditional cardiovascular risk factors identified and managed. This is a major evidence to practice gap. To improve the prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with psoriatic disease, Dr Barbiera lays out some pragmatic approaches for physicians. Also in this podcast, we’re back again this week with Physician’s Weekly regular contributor, known by the pseudonym Dr. MedLaw, a board-certified radiologist and medical malpractice attorney. Today she takes a deep dive in the doctor-patient privilege, what that means, when and how it can be used, and why it is important. Did you know that patient privilege came about as a public health intervention to prevent the spread of venereal disease?But  firstly, in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, today we will kick off our podcast with an interview with Dr. Marco Timmers, the CEO of up-and-coming pharmaceutical company Byondis, who presented their initial data from the phase 3 TULIP trial in breast cancer patients during the Presidental Symposium at the European Society of Medical Oncology, just a few weeks ago. Their new antibody-conjugate drug, called trastuzumab duocarmazine was compared to the physician’s choice for the 3rd line setting in 436 metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. The results showed impressive efficacy in the initial topline results. Enjoy listening. 
Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast,  in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. We have 3 fantastic in-depth interviews for you this week. The European Society of Medical Oncology ended a few days ago and later in this episode,  I had the opportunity to speak with Dr. Javier Cortes, in Barcelona, Spain about his Presidential Symposium late-breaking presentation held at that meeting, in which he revealed the data from the much-anticipated phase 3 DESTINY-Breast03 trial for patients with advanced breast cancer. The results of the antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab deruxtecan compared head-to-head with the current standard, called TDM1,  were practice-changing, with spectacular efficacy (I am not sure I have ever seen a P-value with 22 zeros) and excellent safety outcomes.Also in this episode, our correspondent Dylan Prentner speaks with pediatrician Umbereen Nehal, who was Chief Medical Officer and Vice President of Medical Affairs for Community Healthcare Network in New York city. In addition, Dr. Nehal led a nationwide campaign as chair of the Task Force of American Muslims for Affordable Health Care that was conducted in conjunction with the White House, where she leveraged community resources to educate and enroll American Muslims in new health coverage options. In recognition of this work, Nehal was honored by an invitation from President Barack Obama to the White House. Dr. Nehal talks with us about how to find the balance of hope and humanism in what she says is a system of perverse incentives.But first, Physician’s Weekly speaks with dermatologist Dr Sophie Weatherhead from Newcastle, UK  about their recently published research in phototherapy and psoriasis . Further reading:Watson N, Wilson N, Shmarov F, Zuliani P, Reynolds NJ, Weatherhead SC. The use of psoriasis biomarkers, including trajectory of clinical response, to predict clearance and remission duration to UVB phototherapy. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2021 Jul 13. doi: 10.1111/jdv.17519. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34255884.
This podcast is sponsored by Anelto, a leading technology platform that enables innovative healthcare solutions to keep seniors connected to healthcare providers from anywhere. Visit www.anelto.com.Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast. My name is Dr. Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. We have 3 great in-depth interviews for you this week covering a new trial with promising results to relieve common lower back pain, remote patient monitoring of senior citizens, and a trial showing that having COVID patients position themselves in the prone position, so-called “awake prone positioning”, has improved outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19.     Todd Alamin, MD, spinal surgeon at Stanford University: About 140,000 back pain patients are treated with lumbar fusion in the US every year, and we discuss their clinical trial data suggesting that perioperative outcomes are far better using a perispinous tension band after decompression, as opposed to lumbar fusion after decompression, with at least identical, if not better, long term resultsLater in this episode, Physician’s Weekly speaks with Jie Li, PhD, RRT, RRT-ACCS, RRT-NPS from Rush University in Chicago and Professor Stephan Ehrmann, MD, PhD, from the Intensive Care Unit at the University Hospital in Tours, France about their recent study published in the Lancet Respiratory Medicine looking at awake prone positioning in patients with severe COVID-19. In this prospectively designed, multicenter, international, randomized, open-label meta-trial, with a large sample size (1121 patients), these 2 researchers found that awake prone positioning reduced the incidence of treatment failure within 28 days of enrolment (the primary composite outcome of intubation or death) in patients with acute severe hypoxemic respiratory failure due to COVID-19 supported with high-flow nasal cannula.Also in this episode, our correspondent Dylan Prentner speaks with Mark Denissen , the President and Chief Executive Officer of Anelto about remote patient monitoring  (RPM) of seniors by real-time symptom tracking. Anelto RemoteCare tracks patient engagement, identifies common requests, questions, and commands; and even tracks user responses and adherence to protocols with alerts and reminders.Technologies such as Remote Patient Monitoring are helping transform senior patient care, ensuring patient safety and well-being while ​continuing to live independently. Most ​RPM ​solutions​ ​are not developed specifically with the senior population in mind, especially those with chronic conditions.  ​For seniors, RPM needs to be a complete solution that is easy to use with 24/7 access to care management providers. ​ Visit www.anelto.com.Ehrmann S, Li J, et al; Awake Prone Positioning Meta-Trial Group. Awake prone positioning for COVID-19 acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure: a randomised, controlled, multinational, open-label meta-trial. Lancet Respir Med. 2021 Aug 20:S2213-2600(21)00356-8. 
An interview with lead investigator on full results from EMPEROR-Preserved Trial, which affirm that empagliflozin lowers the risk of CVD for heart failure in patients with HFpEF.Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast. My name is Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly.  This week I am recording this episode in the Italian alps, while attending the European Association of Urology Guidelines Panel meeting for Renal cell carcinoma, but we have 2 great in-depth  interviews for you this week.  Later in this episode, Physician’s Weekly’s Editorial Director Chris Cole interviews Dr. J. Stacey Klutts, a medical microbiologist at Rush University, about his op-ed in the Tampa Bay Times comparing the Delta variant of SARS-CoV-2 to Gorilla Glue, which went viral. And yes, the pun was intended. Dr Klutts also tells us about exactly how the vaccine was developed and how the Delta variant is detected in patients. Did you know there are currently 13 subtypes of the Delta variant? But first, we speak with the presenter at the European Society of Cardiology Annual Congress HOTLINE plenary talk, prof. Stefan Anker at the Charité Hospital in Berlin, Germany, about the full results of the EMPEROR-Preserved trial, which affirm that empagliflozin lowers the risk of cardiovascular death/hospitalization for heart failure in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), leading one expert to say this is “a big day for patients living with HFpEF, a big day for heart failure clinicians.”The primary endpoint—a composite of CV death and hospitalization for heart failure—was reduced by a relative 21% in patients treated with the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor emagliflozin.Published simultaneously online in the New England Journal of Medicine, these results represent the first trial to show unequivocal benefit of any drug on major heart failure outcomes in patients with heart failure and a preserved ejection fraction. Anker SD, et al; EMPEROR-Preserved Trial Investigators. Empagliflozin in Heart Failure with a Preserved Ejection Fraction. N Engl J Med. 2021 Aug 27.  
Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast. My name is Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly.  At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, stay-at-home orders and other restrictions drastically affected how people lived and worked, resulting in social isolation and economic instability. Not surprisingly, presented at the American Chemical Society  which was held Aug. 22-26,, researchers show that some people turned to a variety of drugs for relief. Using wastewater analysis, the team  lead by Dr Bikram Subedi identified a spike in consumption of easily abused prescription opioids and anti-anxiety sedatives, while some illicit drug use plummeted, between March and June 2020. Their results showed that consumption of hydrocodone — one of the most abused prescription opioids — spiked by 72% from March to June 2020. The researchers suggest the change was because people had easier access to doctors as they switched to telemedicine appointments. Conversely, the use of illicit stimulants dropped by 16% for methamphetamine and 40% for cocaine. The researchers suggest that travel restrictions limited interstate and international trafficking of these drugs.   These data strongly suggest that there is an unmet need in multidisciplinary telementoring services to reduce opioid use in the outpatient setting.  In this episode, Physician’s Weekly’s Senior Editor Martta Kelly interviews Dr. Thomas Delate, a research scientist at Kaiser Permanente, about his study on the value of telementoring services in educating prescribers about chronic pain management, including opioid prescriptions , recently published in Clinical Journal of Pain. I think you will be surprised by the efficacy of this approach. Also in this episode, we speak with our regular expert contributor with the pseudonym Dr. Medlaw on how physicians how to “knock it out of the park” while giving a deposition in a malpractice case and the key elements in preparing to testify.But first, we speak with Dr. Bruce Brod, a Professor of Dermatology at University of Pennsylvania, and spokesperson for the America Association of Dermatology, about developments in the treatment and understanding of one of the most common diseases in humans, eczema or atopic dermatitis, which affects up to 30% of children. That’s all the time we have for this week’s podcast. Thanks for listening, I hope you learned something about telementoring for chronic pain relief, about the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis, and about the best way to go about testifying in a court of law. Stay safe and stay healthy.  
Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly Podcast. My name is Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly.  According to the American Burn Association, burn injuries affect approximately 250,000 children in the United States each year. The pain associated with burn injuries extends beyond the injury itself; there is also significant pain from dressing changes, which can be exacerbated by the anxiety of anticipating this additional pain.Although opioids relieve burn injury-related pain, they have serious adverse side effects. Prior studies have investigated alternative approaches to pain reduction in burn injury patients that focus on distraction, such as music, hypnosis, toys, and virtual reality. In this episode, Physician’s Weekly’s Senior Editor Martta Kelly interviews Dr. Henry Xiang about his research on the use of smartphone-based virtual reality games during dressing changes in pediatric patients with burn injuries, recently published in JAMA Network Open.Also in this episode, we speak with Dr. Benjamin Bensadon, an Associate Professor of geriatric medicine at the University of Florida, about developments in dementia care in our ever-increasing aging population.But first, we speak with our regular expert contributor with the pseudonym Dr. Medlaw how physician’s can avoid coming across like a jerk while giving a deposition in a court of law. Xiang H, Shen J, Wheeler KK,  Patterson J, Lever K, Armstrong M, Shi J, Thakkar RK, Groner JI, Noffsinger D, Giles SA, Fabia RB. Efficacy of Smartphone Active and Passive Virtual Reality Distraction vs Standard Care on Burn Pain Among Pediatric Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Netw Open. 2021 Jun 1;4(6):e2112082. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.12082. PMID: 34152420; PMCID: PMC8218073. 
This week on Physician's Weekly...About a third of multiple sclerosis patients find that oral fampridine improves their walking speed by about 25%. However, it is unknown whether fampridine can also improve upper limb function. In a randomized trial run by neurologist Dr. Maria Gaughan at University College Dublin, Ireland addresses this question.There are many reasons a defense lawyer asks for a case to be dismissed by the Court. But what are the conditions under which a malpractice suit can be dismissed? Dr. MedLaw, as always, provides a clear and practical answer to that question.Dr. Linda Girgis,  dedicated board-certified family physician in private practice and Editor in Chief of Physician’s Weekly discusses the landscape  of primary care practice today with COVID.
In an interview with Physician’s Weekly, Annie Sparrow, MD, Special Advisor to the Director-General, World Health Organization, implores the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to heed lessons of the past and warning signs for the futureThis week, the world’s greatest athletes will gather together in Tokyo for the Olympics – and, unfortunately, so will COVID variants. Physician’s Weekly, a trusted source of medical news, voices the growing concern from the medical community of a post-Olympic spike in COVID cases in an interview with Annie Sparrow, MD, Assistant Professor, Population Health Science & Policy, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York. 
Do you remember that the Zika virus outbreak was a real concern at the Brazil Olympic Games of 2016? To find out if Japan has been able to learn from that experience, Physician’s Weekly speaks with Dr. Annie Sparrow, assistant professor of population, and health science, and policy at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, about the potential risks for the Paralympics, held just one month later. Also in this episode, our correspondent Kai Marshall speaks with our regular expert contributor with the pseudonym Dr. Medlaw about how a doctor should prepare for a deposition in a malpractice case: in a court of law, what should you wear? How should you act? What should you never,  ever do?First, we speak to Dr. Guy Jones, an Radiation Oncologist in Reno where he serves as the Medical Director for Oncology Nevada. SERMO, in case you don’t know of it, is a social media platform for physicians. Recently, Dr. Jones and colleagues polled over 70,000 physicians to generate the COVID-19 Real Time Barometer, gathering data about how physicians can counter vaccination resistance. For example, more than 72% of physicians surveyed said that patients continue to voice concerns over vaccine side effects. Still others have reported ongoing misinformation discouraging people from getting vaccines.
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