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Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
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Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Author: The Intercept

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The people behind The Intercept’s fearless reporting and incisive commentary discuss the crucial issues of our time: national security, civil liberties, foreign policy, and criminal justice. Plus interviews with artists, thinkers, and newsmakers who challenge our preconceptions about the world we live in.

205 Episodes
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The war on terror has killed nearly 1 million people and cost more than $8 trillion, according to a report by Brown University’s Costs of War Project. This week on Intercepted: Journalists Murtaza Hussain and Rozina Ali break down how the 9/11 attacks reshaped U.S. foreign and domestic policies. In the last two decades, the U.S. launched two wars, leading to millions dead and wounded. There was also a rise in unmanned drones killing innocent civilians, the use of widespread domestic and international surveillance, innocent people imprisoned, and perpetual human rights abuses and war crimes. And recently, there was a turning point in the war in Afghanistan, with the Taliban retaking the country. Hussain and Ali walk through the systematic failures across institutions — whether it be the government, military leadership, or the press — and the lack of accountability.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The United States flew its last military flight out of Afghanistan, ending the 20-year war in the country — the longest in U.S. history. This week on Intercepted: Journalist Spencer Ackerman discusses his new book, "Reign of Terror: How the 9/11 Era Destabilized America and Produced Trump." In 2001, the George W. Bush administration used the 9/11 attacks to launch the war on terror — an era that led to two massive wars, countless lives lost, mass domestic surveillance, the rounding up of immigrants and people of color, a strengthened security state, drone assassinations, and human rights abuses. And it's far from over, says Ackerman.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The Taliban have taken over Afghanistan, forcing the U.S.-backed Afghan government out. This week on Intercepted: Intercept reporter Murtaza Hussain guides us through how the two-decade-long U.S. War in Afghanistan has concluded. With the U.S. having suffered what appears to be a stunning defeat, national security editor for The Intercept Vanessa Gezari, who also reported from Afghanistan for years after the U.S. war began, breaks down the historical trajectory that led to this moment. In the weeks leading up to the Taliban takeover, lines at the country's only passport office grew longer as fears of instability and violence increased. Andrew Quilty, a photographer and journalist based in Kabul, talked to people at the passport office who were trying to leave. He later describes scenes from the country, only a day after it fell to the Taliban.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Leaked audio reveals how chemicals hazardous to human health and the environment are fast-tracked and approved at the Environmental Protection Agency. This week on Intercepted, investigative journalist Sharon Lerner reports on how the chemical industry pressures the EPA to approve chemicals and pesticides that are dangerous to public health. Lerner speaks with whistleblowers from the agency, scientists who say their research has been manipulated by EPA managers to downplay the dangers of chemicals, including extreme cases that fall under the category of "hair on fire." Lerner also discusses how the agency has approved chemicals and pesticides — at the behest of companies — without proper research into their toxicity, or worse, even though scientists point to the chemicals’ dangers. But this is not new; it follows the long, historical trajectory of the EPA, including the “revolving door” between the agency and the chemical industry.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
For more than six months, The Intercept’s Trevor Aaronson communicated with Russell Dennison, an American man who traveled to Syria and joined the Islamic State. This week on Intercepted: Aaronson, an investigative reporter, discusses American ISIS, the newest Audible Original podcast documentary from The Intercept and Topic Studios, in which he chronicles the story of Russell Dennison, one of the first American citizens to join ISIS and fight with the group in Syria. Almost daily, Dennison communicated with Aaronson, sending him hours of audio chronicling his conversion to Islam, his turn to extremism, and his journey to Syria. Aaronson talks with Intercept reporter Murtaza Hussain about his reporting and what he learned from Dennison.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Water protectors are traveling in growing numbers to stand with the Anishinaabe-led movement to stop the construction of Line 3, a tar sands oil pipeline. This week on Intercepted: Intercept reporter Alleen Brown takes us to northern Minnesota, a flashpoint in the fight to halt the expansion of the fossil fuel industry as the climate crisis deepens. Direct actions and other protests against Line 3 are just heating up and more than 500 people have already been arrested or issued citations. Opponents of the Line 3 pipeline are urging the Biden administration to intervene to stop construction, but his administration recently moved to defend the pipeline. Water protectors are being greeted by an intensifying police response and what scholars are calling a corporate counterinsurgency campaign led by the pipeline company, Enbridge.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The Crisis of Care

The Crisis of Care

2021-06-2336:161

Domestic workers — nannies, house cleaners, and care workers — are one of the fastest-growing labor groups in the U.S. They are also some of the most undervalued and least-protected workers, a factor further exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic. This week on Intercepted: Vanessa Bee and Murtaza Hussain interview Ai-jen Poo, co-founder and executive director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, about the impact of Covid-19 on these vulnerable yet essential workers. They also discuss how the exclusion of labor protections for domestic workers has roots in slavery and how President Joe Biden’s jobs plan could ensure historically denied rights. And we hear stories from domestic workers themselves as they organize for their rights on International Domestic Workers Day in New York City.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Last month, the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation uncovered a mass grave of 215 children on the grounds of a former residential school in British Columbia, Canada. This week on Intercepted: Naomi Klein speaks with residential school survivor Doreen Manuel and her niece Kanahus Manuel about the horrors of residential schools and the relationship between stolen children and stolen land. Doreen’s father, George Manuel, was a survivor of the Kamloops Indian Residential School, where unmarked graves of children as young as 3 years old were found. Kanahus’s father, Arthur Manuel, was also a survivor of the Kamloops residential school. This intergenerational conversation goes deep on how the evils of the Kamloops school, and others like it, have reverberated through a century of Manuels, an experience shared by so many Indigenous families, and the Manuel family’s decades long fight to reclaim stolen land. Warning: This episode contains highly distressing details about the killing, rape, and torture of children. If you are a survivor and need to talk, there is contact information in the show notes.  If you are a former residential school student in distress, or have been affected by the residential school system and need help, you can contact the 24-hour Indian Residential Schools Crisis Line: 1-866-925-4419 Additional mental-health support and resources for Indigenous people are available here.   Show notes: Doreen Manuel can be found @DoreenManuel1 and www.runningwolf.ca  Kanahus can be found at @kanahusfreedom and www.tinyhousewarriors.com “Unsettling Canada: A National Wake Up Call,” by Arthur Manuel “The Reconciliation Manifesto: Recovering the Land, Rebuilding the Economy,” by Arthur Manuel “From Brotherhood to Nationhood: George Manuel and the Making of the Modern Indian Movement,” by Peter McFarlane with Doreen Manuel, afterword by Kanahus Manuel “The Fourth World: An Indian Reality,” by George Manuel and Michael Posluns “These Walls” directed by Doreen Manuel  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Killed in the Darkness

Killed in the Darkness

2021-06-0936:08

When a police officer shoots and kills someone — and there aren’t any witnesses — can we trust the police to investigate themselves? This week on Intercepted: Antoine and Tammy Bufford's son, Cortez, was shot and killed by a St. Louis police officer in 2019. Nearly two years later, the city is still investigating Cortez’s case. No charges have been filed. And the Bufford family is still looking for answers. The police kill more people per capita in St. Louis than in any other American city. Seventy-two percent of these people are Black, like Cortez. The Chicago-based Invisible Institute recently partnered with The Intercept to examine the circumstances of Cortez’s death. Their resulting investigation, reported by Alison Flowers and Sam Stecklow, sheds new light in the search for truth about this police killing.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In the year since the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis and the mass mobilization of protest that followed — the largest collective gesture against police violence in this country’s history — there’s been a constant and energized call to defund or outright abolish policing as we know it in the U.S. This week on Intercepted: The U.S. has been grappling with this same cycle of violence for more than nearly a century: A Black person is killed by police, and protests follow. In 1968, the U.S. tried to find out why this kept happening in cities and small towns across the country with an unprecedented frequency. President Lyndon B. Johnson assembled the Kerner Commission to study the extraordinary violence and destruction of uprisings in cities like Newark, New Jersey, and Detroit the year prior. Their findings should surprise no one. Systemic and institutionalized racism was to blame. Structural white supremacy maintained two societies: “One Black, one white. Separate and unequal.” Historian Elizabeth Hinton, author of “America on Fire: The Untold History of Police Violence and Black Rebellion since the 1960s,” argues that protestors were not rioters but rather political participants in rebellion against their own poverty, inequality, and constant surveillance and brutality by the police.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A week ago, the Biden administration announced support for waiving intellectual property protection for Covid-19 vaccines. In response, Bio, a trade association representing biotechnology companies, issued a statement saying, "The United States has unfortunately chosen to set a dangerous precedent with these actions.” This week on Intercepted: Intercept investigative journalists Sharon Lerner and Lee Fang discuss how the pharmaceutical industry has ruthlessly fought to maintain IP protection from the beginning of the pandemic despite global calls to share knowledge and know-how to end the crisis as quickly as possible. By claiming the same monopoly IP rights on Covid-19 therapeutics and vaccines as other drugs, the industry has perpetuated a market of scarcity and profiteering when a collaborative global response is needed.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Joe Biden's War Powers

Joe Biden's War Powers

2021-04-2836:541

If you went back and looked at every foreign policy decision Joe Biden made — every single one — would you be any closer to understanding him? This week on Intercepted: Our editor-at-large and senior correspondent Jeremy Scahill and reporter Murtaza Hussain examined the past 50 years of Biden’s decisions, poring over hundreds of pages of archival copies of the congressional record and reviewing declassified CIA documents for mentions of Biden. The investigation is called “Empire Politician,” and it’s the result of this painstaking research into Biden’s historical record. Jeremy and Murtaza also analyze Biden’s recent pledge to withdraw forces from Afghanistan by September this year.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
While much of the public’s attention has been focused on the thousands of unaccompanied minors currently in U.S. custody, U.S. Customs and Border Protection has quietly begun a policy of dropping off asylum-seekers in remote border towns along the deadliest stretches of the U.S.-Mexico divide. This week on Intercepted: Intercept reporter Ryan Devereaux travels to the Arizona cities of Ajo and Tucson, speaking to migrants and local volunteers about the dangers and uncertainty people are facing. Devereaux investigates how the Biden administration’s continuation of Trump-era policies like Title 42, which has been used to expel more than half a million migrants in the past year, jeopardizes the safety of asylum-seekers and exacerbates the humanitarian crisis at the border.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The Environmental Protection Agency under the Trump administration invited companies to retroactively amend emissions records of a deadly carcinogenic chemical. This week on Intercepted: Investigative reporter Sharon Lerner explains how 270,000 pounds of the chemical ethylene oxide vanished from the public record right after the EPA determined that it was more toxic than previously known. Ethylene oxide is a colorless and odorless gas used to produce many consumer goods and used extensively as an agent in the sterilization of medical equipment. Despite the EPA’s transition to new leadership under the Biden administration, regulatory capture is a persistent obstacle in the agency’s ability to protect public health and the environment. And as Lerner reports, a disproportionate number of poor communities and communities of color have yet to be alerted to the fact that elevated levels of cancer-causing ethylene oxide permeate the air they breathe. We also hear from a group of Texas women that believes their breast cancer diagnoses are linked to exposure to the chemical.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Jury selection for the murder trial of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin continues after the city announced a $27 million settlement with George Floyd’s family. This week on Intercepted: Organizer and educator Mariame Kaba talks to lead producer Jack D’Isidoro about the case, efforts born out of the uprisings of this past summer, and the role hope plays in building a long-term abolitionist movement. Whether she’s breaking down the historical foundations of the carceral state or laying out a framework for mutual aid, Kaba works tirelessly to reimagine and create a system not rooted in punishment and oppression. They also discuss her new book “We Do This ’Til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice.”  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Few anti-fascists were as influential on Portland’s recent protest scene as Sean Kealiher. He rarely missed a protest, and he would have been front and center last summer when the insurrectionary activism he had long advocated for became a staple on Portland streets. But he wasn’t. In October 2019, at 23, he was killed in front of the state Democratic Party building, which protesters vandalized on Inauguration Day this year. Kealiher’s death, which was ruled a homicide, shocked Portland’s activist community. But no arrests were ever made, and no persons of interest were ever named. Those in Kealiher’s circle saw his unsolved murder as further confirmation of the police’s double standards and antagonism toward the left. This week on Intercepted: While it was largely former President Donald Trump who elevated antifa, short for anti-fascists, to a household name, generations of Portland anti-fascists have for decades opposed far-right, racist extremists as well as police. Reporter Alice Speri dives into Kealiher’s ideology and murder, Portland’s legacy of anti-fascist activism and its deeply intertwined history of white supremacist violence, and how law enforcement’s obsession with antifa led to intelligence failures like U.S. Capitol riot.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As Joe Biden took the oath of office this January, Guatemalan security forces at the Honduran border thwarted thousands of U.S.-bound migrants. While decades-long American imperialism has facilitated displacement throughout the region, the U.S. is increasingly outsourcing its deadly immigration policy. This week on Intercepted: The Biden administration announced it will begin to process the 25,000 asylum seekers stuck in squalid border town camps as part of Trump’s “Remain in Mexico” policy. But immigration advocates fear President Biden will not reverse the bipartisan trend of his predecessors to further militarize the southern border and expand the reaches of immigration enforcement — policies that have led to more migrant deaths and detention in recent decades. Despite Biden’s executive actions to reverse the Muslim ban, initiate migrant family reunification, and fortify DACA, his administration has indicated that it will continue to support Mexican and Guatemalan armed enforcement of their borders on behalf of the U.S.T The activist and writer Harsha Walia joins Intercepted to discuss the Democratic Party’s fundamental role in shaping the long arc of U.S. border policy and why the practice of “prevention through deterrence” will continue to incur more suffering and preventable deaths. She also presents an abolitionist view of a world without borders. Walia’s most recent book is “Border and Rule: Global Migration, Capitalism, and the Rise of Racist Nationalism.”  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A massive police database obtained by The Intercept provides groundbreaking insight into the pervasive surveillance state operated by the Chinese government to repress Uyghurs and other ethnic minorities. This week on Intercepted: A new report from The Intercept provides a raw glimpse into the persecution and sweeping internment of Muslims in the city of Ürümqi, the largest city in northwest China’s Xinjiang region. The report also confirms many of the anti-democratic systems already in place: child separation and carceral re-education, installation of surveillance cameras inside private homes and mosques, immense detention centers, constant police checkpoints, widespread collection of electronic and biometric data, demolition of Uyghur cemeteries, and the forced abortion and sterilization of women. Although the United States has surveilled, abused, rendered, and imprisoned Muslims for decades, former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo declared that China is committing “ongoing” genocide. His successor, Antony Blinken, agreed with that characterization during his confirmation hearing in January. The Intercept’s Ryan Tate, technology reporter Yael Grauer, and anthropologist Darren Byler analyze the unprecedented scale and sophistication of the surveillance campaign detailed in the database. We also hear Uyghur linguist and poet Abduweli Ayup tell the story of his 15-month detainment for operating a Uyghur-language kindergarten in Xinjiang.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Now that Donald Trump is gone from office, what’s next? This week on Intercepted: There are a slew of unanswered questions about the siege of the Capitol. Americans are being asked to believe that the national security apparatus — the same one that charged nearly 200 people en masse, including journalists and observers, with felony rioting when Trump was inaugurated in 2017, and has leveled federal charges including terrorism charges on Black Lives Matter protesters — failed to see the threat to the U.S. Congress posed by right-wing extremists, even as people organized across social media platforms in plain sight. In response to the Capitol siege, Joe Biden and some members of Congress are looking to expand new domestic terrorism laws. They are using the exact same playbook deployed by the Bush-Cheney White House after 9/11 and embraced across the aisles in Congress. This is a dangerous moment where policies with very serious implications could be rushed through in the heat of the moment. The Intercept’s Ryan Devereaux, Ken Klippenstein, Alice Speri, Natasha Lennard, Sam Biddle, Mara Hvistendahl, and Murtaza Hussain share their thoughts on the transition of power from Trump to Biden that is happening today.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this special bonus episode of Intercepted, we take an in-depth look at one of the most consequential eras of modern history, the late 1980s and early 1990s. The Berlin Wall fell in 1989, as the Soviet Union crumbled. The Russian occupation of Afghanistan came to an end, thanks in no small part to the covert and overt involvement of the United States. Bill Clinton brought an end to 12 years of Republican rule, defeating the former CIA director George HW Bush. And with Clinton’s two terms in office came a new spin on US militarism across the world, the notion of liberal so-called humanitarian intervention. The propaganda pitch was that the United States would use its military force as a sort of global police officer whose violent actions were wrapped in the justification that US missiles and bombs and troop deployments were serving a greater good. Nowhere was this more boldly asserted than in the wars in Yugoslavia, which stretched from the early 1990s all the way through 2008 when the US officially recognized the independence of the Serbian province of Kosovo. The years that ushered in the declaration of the end of the Cold War would have a significant impact on global relations and warmaking to this day. University of Chicago scholar Daryl Li has written a meticulously documented book that seeks to understand the trends that emerged from this era, with a focus on putting into context the movement of foreign fighters from country to country. The book is called “The Universal Enemy: Jihad, Empire, and the Challenge of Solidarity.” Li highlights the parallels between transnational jihadists, UN peacekeeping missions and socialist non-alignment and he examines the relationship between jihad and US empire.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (138)

Stuart Wright

xf ru dzsere ed xterra s4 sers4 awf#'ds CDyz

Sep 13th
Reply

Stuart Wright

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Sep 12th
Reply

Phil Cheng

Just proved they follow USA bollocks when it comes to China

Aug 19th
Reply

Jon Ferry

Thank you for this story, I an an Elan school survivor and have been researching the for profit abuse factory for several years now trying to put a podcast together to tell the real truth. I have found some unbelievable things out, like the fact it stayed open for 4 decades even after hundreds of abuse accusations because Senator Bill Diamond profited and protected it. I also have met several of his victims of child sexual abuse when he was the principle at Windham jr high school. He is still in office. I have tried msm, but no one cares, I am hoping you guys at the Intercept actually care about what happened and continues to happen all over our country. Please help me expose these awful people, some former staff who sexually,mentally and physically abused kids there are still working with kids. Please help me and the children. Jonstgwd@gmail.com, I have all the proof and witnesses, I need help, I am begging you guys, I have always respected Jeremy S. and the rest of your work.

Jun 16th
Reply

damned skeptic

of course the pigs aren't interested in finding justice for an anarchist.

Mar 4th
Reply

Striker Bowl

Rubbish

Feb 3rd
Reply

Ed Chow

The worst Intercepted podcast yet. Conjuring up Holocaust imagery with nothing but allegations. The irritating female narrator talked of 'allegations of Uighur cemeteries being destroyed, child seperation, forced sterilisation and detention camps'.. Disgusting hate mongering. Why not allow a counter voice? Why not ask why social media have deplatformed so many Uighurs who speak positively of their lives in China? Why the one sided diatribes by people looking for green cards? Why take debunked lies from Zenz and ASPI and make more Sinophobic BS? No wonder Greenwald left. I think Scahill is a great journo but to be associated with this outfit is not a good look. Not anymore.

Feb 3rd
Reply

N Me

A great orator once said, "The Rules of Kindergarten should apply to [everything]"- Gareth Reynolds @reynoldsgareth

Dec 30th
Reply

N Me

Another well informed guest & thought provoking episode.. it's funny how when you look at a person and just see the human being, how much alike you are to them-human fucking beings..hmm

Dec 30th
Reply

Elias Kamaratos

A thought-provoking episode of the tragic and criminal practice of US-backed terrorism. It begs the question why is revolution against such foreign meddling labelled "terrorism"?

Dec 26th
Reply

Ace

Great interview

Dec 17th
Reply

N Me

Great to hear you again Mr. Scahill! This episode demonstrates how we're (Americans) are going to get much of the same old war machine mentality with the Biden administration. As well as drawing a line straight through from Biden's policies from 40 yrs. ago, through to today. Thanks 😊

Dec 9th
Reply

Martin Schreiner

777

Nov 20th
Reply

Sadle May Friedman

Mr. Mirsha. I apologize for not listening to what you have to say. I read the intro to this session and decided your analysis of Joe Biden infuriates me. Perhaps it is BECAUSE I am 73 with year's of research under my belt. Perhaps it is because in February of this year I almost lost my life and my left leg. Perhaps it is I spent the month of February in a care ficilty trying to walk. Perhaps it is because I fell 4 times in the care facility and once rushed into hospital. With little help from the ER doctor or staff. Even though I was there for 6 hours. Returning to the Care facility without even a CLEAN bandage to replace my blood soaked one. From that I contracted a serious infection. That my friend is just the tip of the iceberg. Today is 9/17/2020. I must have surgery on my leg again. I must have surgery on my left shoulder, replacement. HOWEVER I can not because of COVID 19 and I must be in a care center. Or perhaps it is that I must walk with a walker. Or that I am in pain constantly. Or that I have no one to help me through out my day, grocery shop, get RX'S. OR travel to doctors and MRI'S. OR perhaps I do not have finances to cover my rent, utilities, ambulances, health insurance or food and insurance for by BELOVED dog. That your arrogant synopsis of Joe Biden's presidency makes me want to slap your privilege face. WHAT WE NEED IS EXACTLY AND ESPECIALLY JOE BIDEN. The Unit State's is tethered to a FASCIST REGIME. Yes I do KNOW what FASCIST MEANS. Right NOW we, that is my COUNTRY NEEDS HELP. We need hope, we need a President and Vice President WHO loves the ground they walk on. I need to KNOW that I will get well. Because this isn't living. I want to know that when my mom, aunt's, cousin and me. FOUGHT the good fight when we went to GA, ALB., MISS AND D.C. to march and register black voter's WILL NOT BE LOST. That's JUST the beginning of my storey. I was born in Detroit MI. I am white. As a child my aunt lived in Dearborn MI. it was segregated by the mayor. I remember that my mother was OUTRAGED because my father and his sister took us to Dearborn Beach. My mother NEVER allowed us to go there again. I am sick of this COLOR issue and religion issue. RIGHT NOW WE NEED JOE BIDEN AND KAMALA HARRIS. SO SASHAY YOUR SORRY dialog in a hole. PERIOD. Jerome I want you to know that I stopped listen to your podcasts. I read BLACKWATER when it was published as if it was a bible. Using it every time I could to enlighten people of this GREAT BOOK. I don't know when your insight and narrative changed. But when I located your podcast a few year's past. I thought I was listening to Greenwald or Joe Shapiro. Why I picked your show tonight I can not answer. Sincerely Nelle Friedman

Sep 19th
Reply

Paul larkin

Economy on the brink, people of color get'n killed directly and indirectly from the state & covid and ya'll up in here talk'n about co- habitation, something poor folks been doing forever we just don't have the resources to do it like ya'll and end up getting evicted together...

Aug 5th
Reply

Ricky Kruger

this was amazing .I had never heard of Paul Robson , and now he is my inspiration to get off my butt and start doing something .

Jul 16th
Reply

damned skeptic

After starting listening to the podcast The Iberian knot it seems like we are reliving 1936.

Jul 10th
Reply

R U Poed

The most concise explanation for abolishing current systems of incarceration and policing in society.

Jun 10th
Reply

damned skeptic

is there ever going to be new Uncivil episodes?

Jun 10th
Reply (1)

J Milw

wonderful insight and perspective

Jun 10th
Reply
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