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TED Talks Daily

Author: TED

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Want TED Talks on the go? Every weekday, this feed brings you our latest talks in audio format. Hear thought-provoking ideas on every subject imaginable -- from Artificial Intelligence to Zoology, and everything in between -- given by the world's leading thinkers and doers. This collection of talks, given at TED and TEDx conferences around the globe, is also available in video format.
933 Episodes
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Everyone should participate in decision-making and politics -- and it starts at home, says activist Hajer Sharief. She introduces a simple yet transformative idea: that parents can teach their children about political agency by giving them a say in how their households are run, in the form of candid family meetings where everyone can express their opinions, negotiate and compromise. "We need to teach people that political, national and global affairs are as relevant to them as personal and family affairs," she says. "Can you really afford not to be interested or not participate in politics?"
Every 12 years, a megacity springs up in India for the Kumbh Mela religious festival -- what's built in ten weeks is completely disassembled in one. What can we learn from this fully functioning, temporary settlement? In a visionary talk, urban designer Rahul Mehrotra explores the benefits of building impermanent cities that can travel, adapt or even disappear, leaving the lightest possible footprint on the planet.
Seventy thousand years ago, our human ancestors were insignificant animals, just minding their own business in a corner of Africa with all the other animals. But now, few would disagree that humans dominate planet Earth; we've spread to every continent, and our actions determine the fate of other animals (and possibly Earth itself). How did we get from there to here? Historian Yuval Noah Harari suggests a surprising reason for the rise of humanity.
Shocking, but true: the United States has the highest rate of deaths for new mothers of any developed country -- and 60 percent of them are preventable. With clarity and urgency, physician Elizabeth Howell explains the causes of maternal mortality and shares ways for hospitals and doctors to make pregnancy safer for women before, during and after childbirth.
Early education is critical to children's success -- but millions of kids in the United States still don't have access to programs that prepare them to thrive in kindergarten and beyond. Enter the UPSTART Project, a plan to bring early learning into the homes of children in underserved communities, at no cost to families. Education innovator Claudia Miner shares how UPSTART is setting four-year-olds up for success with 15 minutes of learning a day -- and how you can help. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
Refugee and immigrants rights attorney Melanie Nezer shares an urgently needed historical perspective on the crisis at the southern US border, showing how citizens can hold their governments accountable for protecting the vulnerable. "A country shows strength through compassion and pragmatism, not through force and through fear," she says.
We're not doing frontline exploratory science in a huge portion of the world -- the places governments deem too hostile or disputed. What might we be missing because we're not looking? In this fearless, unexpectedly funny talk, paleoanthropologist Ella Al-Shamahi takes us on an expedition to the Yemeni island of Socotra -- one of the most biodiverse places on earth -- and makes the case for scientists to explore the unstable regions that could be home to incredible discoveries.
Film has the power to change the way we think about ourselves and our culture. Documentarian and TED Fellow Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy uses it to fight violence against women, turning her camera on the tradition of honor killings in Pakistan. In a stirring talk, she shares how she took her Oscar-winning film on the road in a mobile cinema, visiting small towns and villages across Pakistan -- and shifting the dynamics between women, men and society, one screening at a time.
Since its founding in 1851, the "New York Times" has published thousands of obituaries -- for heads of state, famous celebrities, even the inventor of the sock puppet. But only a small percentage of them chronicle the lives of women and people of color. In this insightful talk, "Times" editor Amy Padnani shares the story behind "Overlooked," the project she's leading to recognize people from history whose deaths were ignored -- and refocus society's lens on who is considered important.
We get stronger, not weaker, by engaging with ideas and people we disagree with, says Zachary R. Wood. In an important talk about finding common ground, Wood makes the case that we can build empathy and gain understanding by engaging tactfully and thoughtfully with controversial ideas and unfamiliar perspectives. "Tuning out opposing viewpoints doesn't make them go away," Wood says. "To achieve progress in the face of adversity, we need a genuine commitment to gaining a deeper understanding of humanity."
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Comments (549)

Ryan Pena

wow what a great talk! I don't have any kids but damn this is definitely something I'd love to do I the future. fascinating idea

Jul 23rd
Reply

Laura Bridet

I don't completely agree but it's an interesting point of view

Jul 23rd
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Kenneth Hopkins

this makes it seem like all humans cooperate with each other, and that is not true. "1000 chimpanzees cannot cooperate at all"... put 1000 humans together and see what you get...

Jul 22nd
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GaurdianxShot

Kenneth Hopkins That's fair, but if we were forced into a chimp war maybe we would all at least fight together? it's a long shot- but possible

Jul 23rd
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Carey Murphy

Seriously, this guy is fantastic! I wish that I had ever had a professor like him. I would sit and listen about the Evolution of Dirt... if he were the one teaching it. Lol!

Jul 20th
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Colbert Williams

Carey Murphy haha, this person is really good!

Jul 22nd
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Akwasi Owusu Antwi

Am interested in participating in upstart for my boy. I am in Ghana Africa. My email akwasi.antwi@outlook.com

Jul 20th
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Chris McCleary

This doesn't answer the title's question. What gave rise to cooperation and imagination?

Jul 19th
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Donna Milligan

this is 100% ad. you are bad people

Jul 18th
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Rita Moore

Donna Milligan 😰😰

Jul 19th
Reply

Akira Kenzo

what a load of shit! fucking horseshit makes more sense than this trash

Jul 18th
Reply

Katie Reeve - Tucker

,1,1

Jul 17th
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Katie Reeve - Tucker

,1,1

Jul 17th
Reply

Katie Reeve - Tucker

,1,1

Jul 17th
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Rob Davidson

That is an awful way of saying it. What you are advocating is total globalization. A total lack of regulating migrations would be catastrophic for any country. Wages will plummet ..living conditions and standards will drop...the rich will exploit the poor even worse than now. Give your head a shake. And do not even start to talk about crime spikes and drug deaths. You are niave and uncaring to go down this road. You. are being used for political hit points and should be ashamed.

Jul 16th
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Ryan Pena

Rob Davidson huh? no one is arguing for a complete abolishment of borders and the speaker isn't either. you're using a straw man argument

Jul 17th
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Ricardo Cardoso

I spotted two lies by this reporter. how many did you?

Jul 16th
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jordan roth

This was a disappointing Ted talk. He failed to do the one thing his talk was about. At no point did his views change based on actually hearing someone else's view point, instead he just kept on trying to push his own.

Jul 14th
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Chris Johnson

People like you are the reason there is this perpetual cycle of discrimination against people of colour. Go get a life you ignorant piece of 💩.

Jul 14th
Reply

Atia Janssens

lovely but they can't hear you, because their ears are clogged up by dollars

Jul 10th
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Dank Diaries

I have a new descriptor. #WiseUse

Jul 9th
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Stephen Zalen

Monica missed something obvious. Shame may be a business, but some "victims" are complicent in a scam. That means the "victim" profits too and thus is not a victim. (Monica seems like a real victim.)

Jul 8th
Reply

Mecsad

please add transcrib to all of your podcasts.

Jul 8th
Reply

Sajad Jalilian

Life is pointet to chaos, sooner or later it happens, make your peace with it. Ps: I follow TED for hearing things that worth to think about, for these kind of talks anybody can go to church or mosque or whatever

Jul 7th
Reply
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