DiscoverBlack Is America
Black Is America
Claim Ownership

Black Is America

Author: OWLS, LLC

Subscribed: 9Played: 32
Share

Description

The Black Is America podcast highlights little-known African American figures who helped write the story of America. Join us as we shed new light on lost chapters in our nation's history. Hear the amazing, inspiring accounts of black American inventors, heroes, scientists, entrepreneurs and so much more.

While racism is a common theme, it is not the central theme. These stories focus instead on what black people have contributed in spite of it, and the impact of those contributions shows clearly that African American History is American History.
18 Episodes
Reverse
In this episode of Black is America podcast, delve into the inspiring story of Sergeant First Class Alwyn Cashe, a remarkable African-American hero of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Host Dominic Lawson narrates the gripping account of Cashe’s selfless bravery on a fateful night in October 2005. Learn about his early life in Oviedo, Florida, his distinguished military career, and the extraordinary courage he displayed when his unit was attacked by an IED. This episode not only highlights Cashe’s heroic actions but also explores the significant contributions of black non-commissioned officers throughout military history. Drawing parallels to historical figures like John Horse and the Black Seminoles, Lawson provides a rich, contextual narrative that honors the legacy of African-American soldiers. Posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, Alwyn Cashe’s legacy is a testament to the valor and sacrifice of black soldiers. Join us as we celebrate his life, his heroism, and the lasting impact he has made on military history. Episode Breakdown: Introduction: The episode opens on a moonlit night on October 17, 2005, in the Aladin province of Iraq. Sergeant First Class Alwyn Cashe is on patrol with his unit when their Bradley fighting vehicle is struck by an IED, igniting a series of events that would define Cashe’s legacy as an American hero. Background: Listeners are taken through Cashe’s early life in Oviedo, Florida, where he grew up as the youngest of ten siblings. Despite humble beginnings, Cashe’s dedication and adventurous spirit led him to enlist in the United States Army in 1988. His military career spans multiple conflicts, including Operation Desert Storm, where he honed his leadership skills and built a reputation for courage under fire. The Heroic Incident: The heart of the episode details the harrowing incident where Cashe’s vehicle is hit by an IED. Despite being drenched in fuel and engulfed in flames, Cashe selflessly rescues his fellow soldiers, displaying unmatched bravery. His actions on that night, pulling each soldier from the burning vehicle while under enemy fire, highlight his extraordinary heroism and dedication. Reflection and Legacy: The narrative reflects on the significant role of black non-commissioned officers in the military, drawing parallels between Cashe’s actions and the historical bravery of figures like John Horse and the Black Seminoles. Personal anecdotes and historical context enrich the story, emphasizing the profound impact of African-American soldiers in shaping military history. Recognition and Honors: The episode concludes with a tribute to Cashe’s legacy, detailing the posthumous awards and recognitions he received, including the Medal of Honor. The story of Cashe's heroism continues to inspire, and his legacy is honored through various dedications, including military facilities and community spaces named in his memory.   That time Daniel "Chappie" James had to let Moammar Gadhafi know what was up Sources for this episode include The United States Army, The Department of Defense, The White House, the Center for Disease Control, the program 60 Minutes courtesy of CBS News, C-Span, ABC 10 Sacramento, Dr. Amy Sturgis of Lenoir-Rhyne University in collaboration with Learn Liberty, The Washington Post, The Atlanta-Journal Constitution, The Los Angles Times The Orlando Sentinel, and the Honolulu Star Advertiser.
This episode explores the life and career of Anne Lowe, a pioneering African American fashion designer who dressed high society elites in the early to mid 20th century. We learn about her early life in Alabama, training in New York, moving to Harlem during the Renaissance, and most famously designing Jacqueline Kennedy's wedding dress. Timeline: Early Life & Training Born in Clayton, AL in 1898 Learned sewing from her mother and grandmother Moved to NYC in 1917 to formally train at S.T. Taylor Design School Segregated at school but still excelled and finished early Building Her Brand Opened successful dress salon in Tampa, FL from 1919-1928 Saved $20,000 to move to Harlem, NYC during the Renaissance Quickly built clientele among NYC elites and socialites Designed Olivia de Havilland's Oscars dress in 1947 Peak Years Client list included Rockefellers, Roosevelts, duPonts and more Hired to design 1953 wedding dress for Jacqueline Kennedy Water pipe disaster destroyed original dress 10 days before wedding Remade it in 5 days with help of employees and community Late Career Struggles Focused more on artistry than business side, fell into debt Wealthy clients anonymously paid off $13k in back taxes she owed Died in 1981 at age 82 after inspiring new generation of designers Key Quote: "I love my clothes and I'm not interested in sewing for café society or social climbers. I sew for the families of the Social Register." - Anne Lowe Impact: Lowe's elegant designs broke racial barriers in high fashion. She paved the way for future Black designers through her perseverance and excellence. Subscribe, review & learn more at www.blackisamericapodcast.com   The Black Is America podcast, a presentation of OWLS Education Company, was created and is written, researched, and produced by Dominic Lawson. Executive Producer Kenda Lawson Cover art was created by Alexandria Eddings of Art Life Connections.  Sources to create this episode include Ebony Magazine, The Saturday Evening Post, The JFK Library, The Academy, C-Span, History.com, and  Blackpast.com  Special thanks to fashion designer Ayeshia Smith of Ayeshia.com. Follow her on IG at Ayeshia.appareal Also pecial thanks to Elizabeth Way, Associate Museum curator at the Fashion Institute of Technology.  Special thanks to first Chutney Young for suggesting Ann Lowe as a topic. And lastly thank you Lisa Woolfork, founder of Black Women Stich and host of the Stitch Please Podcast. We collaborated with her on this espisode and she introduced us to Elizabeth Way. Follow on IG At Black Women Stitch.    
This episode of the Black is America podcast tells the story of Guy Bluford, the first African American astronaut in space. We'll explore his early life and inspirations, his path to NASA, the historical significance of his achievement, and his spaceflights. Guy Bluford's Upbringing and Early Inspiration - Guy Bluford was born in 1942 in Philadelphia, PA and became fascinated with aviation and engineering from a young age.  - He was inspired by the Tuskegee Airmen and other pioneering African American aviators who were breaking barriers in the 1940s and 50s. - Bluford joined the Air Force, became a pilot, and flew combat missions during the Vietnam War, further fueling his passion for aerospace. Becoming an Astronaut - In the late 1970s, Bluford was selected for NASA's astronaut training program along with other African Americans like Ron McNair and Fred Gregory. - This was part of the first class of Space Shuttle astronauts as NASA prepared to launch a new era of spaceflight. Making History in Space - On August 30, 1983, Bluford launched into space aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger, becoming the first African American astronaut in space. - Original Tuskegee Airmen and other African American aviation pioneers attended the launch in recognition of Bluford's achievement. - Bluford flew a total of four Space Shuttle missions between 1983 and 1992, logging nearly 700 hours spent in space. Inspiring Future Generations - Bluford's accomplishment built on the struggles of earlier pioneers like Ed Dwight Jr. and inspired future African Americans to pursue careers in the space program. - After retiring from NASA, Bluford remained committed to encouraging youth, especially minorities, to pursue STEM careers.  - His pioneering journey from Philadelphia to the cosmos opened doors for future African American astronauts, scientists, and engineers. Conclusion - In conclusion, Guy Bluford broke barriers as the first African American in space, both symbolically and literally reaching new heights.  His achievement highlighted the perseverance and talent within the African American community and paved the way for greater diversity in space exploration. The Black Is America podcast, a presentation of OWLS Education, was created and is written, researched, and produced by Dominic Lawson.   Executive Producer Kenda Lawson   Cover art was created by Alexandria Eddings of Art Life Connections.  Sources to create this episode include NASA.gov,History.com’s program Military Heroes,The New York Times,The History Makers.org,The International SciEd Center and Space Museum in Hutchinson Kansas,The Television Academy Foundation, Arcfireld Weather,ABC News, Smithsonian Magazine, and CBS News.     
A preview of season 3
This special Juneteenth episode of the Black Is America podcast delves into the life and legacy of Barbara Jordan, an American lawyer, educator, and politician who was a leading force in the Democratic Party. Known as a "Protector of American Democracy," Jordan left an indelible mark on American history. Part 1: The episode begins with an introduction to Barbara Jordan, a trailblazer born and raised in Houston, Texas. Her early life, educational pursuits, and initial political career are examined.  Part 2: The second part dives deeper into Jordan's historic term as a U.S. Congresswoman, marking the first African-American woman from the South to serve in the House of Representatives. Key highlights include her impactful role in President Nixon's impeachment proceedings. Her notable speech at the DNC convention two years later is also discussed, which further increased her prominence and set out a new vision for America. Part 3: The final part brings attention to Jordan's legacy, especially her impact on subsequent generations of politicians and public figures. Despite challenges, Jordan continued to advocate for an America true to its principles. The episode closes with a reflection on the progress made since Jordan's time and the importance of remembering and honoring her contributions. Episode Highlights: Introduction and Early Life of Barbara Jordan Barbara Jordan's Political Career Barbara Jordan's Role in Nixon's Impeachment Barbara Jordan's Speech at the 1976 DNC Convention Impact and Legacy of Barbara Jordan Reflection on the Progress Made Credits: Created, written, researched, and produced by Dominic Lawson. Executive producer is Kenda Lawson. Cover art by Alexandria Eddings of Art Life Connections. Resources: The New York Times, CBS News, U.S. House of Representatives Archives and the Texas Southern University Barbara Jordan Archives. Connect: Subscribe to the Black Is America Podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, or your preferred podcast platform. For a full transcript of this episode and other resources, visit www.blackisamericapodcast.com.
In this special Memorial Day presentation of the Black Is America podcast, we explore the extraordinary life and enduring legacy of Doris "Dorie" Miller. From his humble beginnings in Waco, Texas, to his decision to join the Navy during a time of racial segregation, Dorie's story captivates and inspires.  We first set the stage for his extraordinary path. Next, we delve into the events leading up to World War II and examine the impact of his choices. Then we highlight his heroic actions during the attack on Pearl Harbor, showcasing his bravery and resilience in the face of adversity. Lastly, we explore the recognition he received and the ultimate sacrifice he made aboard the USS Liscome Bay. We also introduce you to Charles Jackson French and his heroic actions aboard the USS Gregory during the attack. There's also the exploration of a "what if" scenario with Jackie Robinson at Pearl Harbor (yep, he was there too!) This Memorial Day, we pay tribute to Dorie Miller's unwavering courage and honor his legacy as an American defender. Join us for this powerful and enlightening episode of the Black Is America podcast. More information on what happened to Jesse Washington The Black Is America podcast, a presentation of OWLS Education, was created and is written, researched, and produced by Dominic Lawson. Executive Producer: Kenda Lawson Cover art was created by Alexandria Eddings of Art Life Connections.  Sources to create this episode include Naval History and Heritage Command, CBS News, Infographics Show, ESPN’s Down and Distance Podcast with Ivan Maisel,  the Brookings Institute, Waco History.com Scenes from the movie Peal Harbor are courtesy of Touchstone Films and Jerry Bruckheimer Films and is distributed by Buena Vista Pictures. Be sure to Like, review and subscribe to the Black Is America Podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, where ever you like to listen to podcasts. Also, let people know about the podcast, we would appreciate that very much.  For a full transcript of this episode and other resources, go to www.blackisamericapodcast.com. There you can read our blog, leave us a review, or you can leave a voicemail where you can ask a question or let us know what you think about the show that we may play in an episode.     
In the #BlackHistoryMonthFinale, host Dominic Lawson tells the inspiring story of Sergeant Henry Johnson, the first American hero of World War I. Johnson was a member of the 369th Infantry Regiment, an all-black unit known as the Harlem Hellfighters, and his bravery and sacrifice in battle helped to establish the United States as a military superpower firmly. Despite facing racism and discrimination at home, Johnson and his fellow soldiers fought courageously for their country and paved the way for future generations of African American soldiers. Key Points: Sergeant Henry Johnson was the first American hero of World War I and a member of the all-black 369th Infantry Regiment, known as the Harlem Hellfighters. Johnson's bravery and battle sacrifice helped establish the United States as a military superpower. Despite facing racism and discrimination at home, Johnson and his fellow soldiers fought courageously for their country. Johnson was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor in 2015, and efforts are underway to rename a military base in his honor. The story of Sergeant Henry Johnson and the Harlem Hellfighters is an important part of African American and United States history. Show Notes: Background on the 369th Infantry Regiment and the Harlem Hellfighters Discussion of racism and discrimination faced by African American soldiers during World War I Detailed account of Sergeant Henry Johnson's bravery in battle and the many injuries sustained while defending his fellow soldiers Discussion of the posthumous honors and awards given to Johnson, including the Medal of Honor and the Purple Heart Information on efforts to rename a military base in honor of Johnson and the Harlem Hellfighters Analysis of the question of why African Americans continue to fight for a country that does not always love them back Quotes from Johnson and other African American leaders Conclusion and call to action for listeners to support the Black Is America Podcast and continue learning about important moments in African American history. Zimmermann Telegram | Facts, Text, & Outcome | Britannica   Sources: White house.gov History.com Smithsonian Magazine The Department of Defense The National Museum of African American History and Culture The National Archives CSPAN Website: www.blackisamericapodcast.com
Introduction: In this episode, we delve into the life and legacy of Sylvia Robinson, the music executive and producer who brought hip hop to the masses and changed the music landscape forever. Sylvia was the founder of Sugar Hill Records and was responsible for producing some of the biggest hip hop hits of all time. Segment 1: Ed Anderson, a DJ at the station, was asked to play the song during the last hour of his show. The song became an instant hit and went viral, with people calling the station to ask what it was. The song was a commercial success and peaked at number 36 on the Billboard Hot 100, number one in Canada and the Netherlands, and number three in the UK. Segment 2: Sylvia changed the name of her label from All Platinum to Sugar Hill Records after the success of the Sugar Hill Gang. She went on to sign successful acts such as the Treacherous Three, Funky Four Plus One, and others. Sylvia even produced some of the music videos for her artists, including working with a young Spike Lee. She signed Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five to create the hit song "The Message", which was considered one of the greatest songs of all time by Time Magazine. Segment 3: Despite the success of Sugar Hill Records, not everyone was happy about it. The originators of hip-hop didn't understand how three inexperienced MCs not from the birthplace of hip-hop could create its first commercial success. Sylvia knew that for the evolution of hip hop, she had to put out fun and great music, but she also had to get out what was going on in the streets. Segment 4: Sugar Hill Records fell on hard times due to competition, and financial and legal problems. Many of the founding hip-hop pioneers were going commercial, and new players in the game, including LL Cool J, Run DMC, and the Beastie Boys, were entering the scene. Sylvia and her husband Joe would divorce, and Sylvia would create a new label with a group from New Jersey called the New Style. The group would resurface two years later under a new name, Naughty by Nature. Conclusion: Sylvia passed away in 2011 due to heart failure and was 76 years old. In 2022, she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame due to her contribution of bringing hip hop to the masses. The Black Is America podcast, a presentation of OWLS Education, was created and is written, researched, and produced by Dominic Lawson. Executive Producer Kenda Lawson Alexandria Eddings of Art Life Connections created cover art.  Sources to create this episode include National Public Radio, St. Louis Public Radio, BBC 4, American Masters, Billboard .com, and more. For a complete list, look in the show note of your podcast player or our website www.blackisamericapodcast.com. Be sure to Like, review, and subscribe to the Black Is America Podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, where ever you like to listen to podcasts. Also, let people know about the podcast,we would appreciate that very much.  For a full transcript of this episode and other resources, go to www.blackisamericapodcast.com. There you can read our blog, leave us a review, or you can leave a voicemail where you can ask a question or let us know what you think about the show that we may play in an episode. You can also hit the donation button if you like what you heard which helps us to create more educational content like this.   
The award-winning podcast returns with all-new stories of great African Americans.  In this preview, we share audience reviews and how the show faired during award season. We also share the opening for the season 2 premiere of Doris Miller: The American Defender. Lastly, we pay tribute to civil rights legend and historian Carl Westmoreland.   Season 2 of the Black Is America podcast debuts on Feb. 1, 2023. 
In the season one finale of Black Is America, we share the story of Tom Lee. On May 8, 1925, when the M.E. Norman steamer suffered a catastrophic failure, Tom Lee saved thirty-two people from the Mississippi River. Fellow Memphian and historian Terri Stephens comes along for the ride to tell the tale of the humble hero.    In this episode, you will hear: Why was Tom Lee on the river that day? Why was it dangerous for Tom to attempt the rescues? Why is May a fun time in Memphis? How did Memphis repay his good deed?    Sources to create this episode come Memphis Magazine.com and Michael Finger beautiful piece be sure to read it as it has additional information about what happened that day. We have a link there in the show notes. NBC Olympics.com, WREG Memphis, WCNC Charlotte, GilderLehrman.org, History.com, and more. For a complete list, look in the show note of your podcast player or our website www.blackisamericapodcast.com. Be sure to Like, review and subscribe to the Black Is America Podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, where ever you like to listen to podcasts. Also, let people know about the podcast. We would appreciate that very much.  For a full transcript of this episode and other resources, go to www.blackisamericapodcast.com. There you can read our blog, leave us a review, or you can leave a voicemail where you can ask a question or let us know what you think about the show that we may play in an episode. You can also hit the donation button if you like what you heard which helps us to create more educational content like this. 
In August 1963, people traveled far and wide to Washington DC to advocate for civil rights. They took planes, trains, and automobiles. However, one man traveled there in a different way.    To commemorate the 59th anniversary of the March on Washington For Jobs and Freedom, we lace up our skates to tell the story of Ledger “Roller Man” Smith and his almost 700-mile journey to Washington DC.    In this episode, you will hear: Why Ledger Smith went to the March On Washington on roller skates Why Dr. King thought it was essential for Civil Rights to desegregate places of leisure Ledger Smith route from Chicago to Washington DC Why media was essential to the Civil Rights movement More about an unlikely ally in the Civil Rights movement The Children's March and Kelly Ingram park Notable figures mentioned in this episode: Martin Luther King Jr. John Lewis Mamie Chalmers Bayard Rustin  A.G. Gaston A. Phillip Randolph President John F. Kennedy  Attorney General Robert Kennedy President Barack Obama The Black Is America podcast, a presentation of OWLS Education, was created and is written, researched, and produced by me, Dominic Lawson. Executive Producer Kenda Lawson Cover art was created by Alexandria Eddings of Art Life Connections. Credit for this episode's cover art: The Baltimore Afro American Sources to create this episode come from The National Civil Rights Museum, History.com, The New York Times, The Baltimore Afro American,  The National Museum of African American History & Culture, WAMU National Public Radio in DC Scenes from United Skates are courtesy of Vice and HBO Documentary Films, a Warner Brothers Discovery Company.   Mamie Chalmers audio courtesy of Comcast NBCUniversal's Voices of the Civil Rights Movement David Vann and A.G. Gaston audio courtesy of the Youtube Channel curated by Geoff Hiron (Note: The host could not locate the original source of audio) "Beat It" is written and performed by Michael Jackson and produced by Michael Jackson & Quincy Jones for Epic Records.  "I'm On My Way" performed by Mamie Brown & Choir from "Lest We Forget, Vol. 2: Birmingham, Alabama, 1963 - Mass Meeting" from Smithsonian Folkways Recordings. Audio of Martin Luther King Jr. courtesy of Martin Luther King Jr Research and Education Institute at Stanford University Audio of John Lewis courtesy of the National Archives Audio of President Barack Obama courtesy of BBC News Be sure to Like, review and subscribe to the Black Is America Podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, where ever you like to listen to podcasts. Also, let people know about the podcast. We would appreciate that very much.  For a full transcript of this episode and other resources, go to www.blackisamericapodcast.com. You can read our blog, leave us a review, or leave a voicemail where you can ask a question or let us know what you think about the show we may play in an episode. You can also hit the donation button if you like what you heard, which helps us to create more educational content like this. 
How did Black America help birth a nation? In this special episode of the Black Is America podcast, we explore the story of the known patriots like Crispus Attucks and also some of the lesser-known ones like Peter Salem and Salem Poor. We also make the case why the 4th of July is very important to Black America.  In this episode, you will hear: How George Washington felt about enslaved black people serving in the Continental Army Why Crispus Attucks was in the front of the crowd at the Boston Massacre  How Black America saved soldiers a Valley Forge  Sources to create this episode come from History.com, Blackpast.com, Battlefield.org, and National Park Service at nationalparkservice.gov. Scenes from Good Times are courtesy of Tandem Productions and Sony Pictures Television.
How did Black America create Memorial Day?  In this special episode of the Black Is America podcast, we explore the little-known story of recently enslaved citizens of Charleston, South Carolina, honored Union soldiers.  In doing so, they inadvertently create a holiday we celebrate today. In this episode, you will hear: How the Charlestonians honored the Union Soldiers Who was given credit for creating Memorial Day How South Carolina has acknowledged what happened on May 1, 1865.  Yale professor David W. Blight is featured in this episode. His audio is courtesy of The New York Historical Society and Yale University.  This episode was also created due to sources from The Root.com, History.com, and Detroit ABC affiliate WXYZ.   
How does one compete in NASCAR while facing discrimination?  In this episode of the Black Is America podcast, we chronicle the life of NASCAR legend Wendell Scott. The Danville, Virginia native goes from the bootlegging on the back roads of the Commonwealth to extraordinary heights of stock car racing. Even though Scott would never have a significant sponsor, he would still compete against the best in NASCAR.  In this episode, you will hear: A brief history of Danville, Virginia Why the story of Wendell Scott mirrors the story of NASCAR Two pivotal moments in Wendell's Scott Career Why Wendell Scott served as his mechanic About Wendell Scott's success as a driver and owner Notable figures mentioned in this episode: Marshall Major Taylor The Texas Western Starting 5 Darrell "Bubba" Wallace Jr.  Willy T. Ribbs Bill Lester Michael Jordan John Cohen Floyd Mayweather Jr. Brad Daugherty Sir Lewis Hamilton 
How does one become a musical legend? In the conclusion of Marian Anderson: The American Contralto, we chronicle Marian's journey through Europe as she is called "the voice of the century." After a successful trip to Europe and being met with resistance to perform at Consitution Hall, it led to a concert at the Lincoln Memorial. Later we talk to Charlie Edmunds about her experience teaching music in East Tennessee and a new program she is creating to expose more students to learn how to play black music. In this episode, you will hear: What Marian needed in Europe and how Roland Hayes helped The type of money Marian was making at her peak. The origin of the Nuremberg Race Laws and how they affected Marian Why Marian was not able to perform at Constitution Hall A significant song she performed at the Lincoln Memorial  Notable figures mentioned in this episode: Roland Hayes Katherine Mary Dunham Walter White
What does it take to be the best to do it?  In Part 1 of this Black Is America podcast presentation, we chronicle the story of the great American contralto Marian Anderson. We discuss her early singing experiences in church, the power and emotion of the Negro spiritual, and why what Black America creates is often hard to duplicate. In this episode, you will hear: About Marian's upbringing Why the church is essential to the African American community The cheat code embedded in the black community About H.T. Burleigh and the art of the Negro spiritual Why did Marian Anderson go to Europe And so much more
What does it take to make the ultimate sacrifice? In the first episode of the Black Is America podcast, we learn the story of Lt. John Fox. From very humble beginnings in the Cincinnati area to courageous actions in the Italian theater, John Fox is an excellent example of Black America displaying bravery on the battlefield in the face of discrimination.  In this episode, you will hear:  Where John Fox grew up More about the village of Sommocolonia How his life was building towards his actions on Dec. 26th, 1944 Understand more about the famous 366th Infantry Regiment Why Captain Aaron Fisher was important in John Fox's military career. Why John Fox was worthy of the Medal of Honor And so much more
Black Is America Podcast creator Dominic Lawson explains why he created the show and what you can come to expect from Season 1. It also includes a clip from the very first episode. 
Comments 
loading