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Crime Capsule

Crime Capsule

Author: Evergreen Podcasts | Killer Podcasts

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From DNA testing to the Dixie Mafia, Crime Capsule brings you new stories of true crime in American history. Join writer and host Benjamin Morris for exclusive interviews with authors from Arcadia Publishing, writing the hottest books on the most chilling stories of our country’s past. Crime Capsule: history so interesting it’s criminal.

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This week, we welcome back Rita Schuler to talk about everything from her books to the Alex Murdaugh murders in the Lowcountry of South Carolina. Gwendolyn Elaine Fogle's murder remained a cold case for 37 years until the dogged work of two detectives. Investigators periodically revisited the case over the years, but it remained the department's top cold case for thirty-seven years. Special Agent Lt. Rita Shuler worked on the case shortly after she joined the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED), and she just couldn't let it go, not even after her retirement in 2001. In May 2015, Lt. Shuler teamed up with new investigator Corporal Gean Johnson, and together they uncovered key evidence that had been overlooked. With new advancements in DNA and fingerprint technology, they brought the case to its end in just four months. Join Shuler as she details the gruesome history of this finally-solved case. Listening to Rita's experiences was insightful and a testament to law enforcement professionals' dedication and hard work. If you're interested in learning more about these fascinating cases and Rita's perspective, be sure to check out her previous episodes on Crime Capsule. #CrimeCapsule #LawEnforcement #PodcastEpisode #Justice #Collaboration #Persistence #Timing Buy her book HERE
Chapel Hill has seen its share of violence and murder, but it has been able to push those instances aside and keep the ambiance of a Norman Rockwell–style small town. A walk through the campus of the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill can be inspiring, but the school has a darker side that has been well hidden. Over the years, there have been many murders that have taken place among the oak trees and in the dorms and frat houses on campus. Many of the murders are unsolved and remain mysteries to this day. The victims know the truth, though, that evil has no boundaries. Local historian Rick Jackson narrates the mysteries of one of North Carolina’s quaintest towns. Rick Jackson is a native North Carolinian who grew up in Durham and now lives with his family in Wake Forest, just outside Raleigh. He currently teaches business and economic courses to high school students after spending many years in banking and finance in various positions. He has always had a passion for history and the stories of the people that lived it. He holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Campbell University and an MBA from The University of Mount Olive. PURCHASE HERE
CC-100th Teaser 2

CC-100th Teaser 2

2024-06-0602:23

Join us next week as we resume our 100th episode celebration.
In 1978, Elaine Fogle was found murdered in her home in rural South Carolina. After months of investigation by local and state investigators, the case went cold. But one of those investigators, Lieutenant Rita Shuler, wouldn't let it go: Shuler would spend the next 40 years pursuing Fogle's case until she finally cracked it -- and then wrote a book about it. This episode is part one of our two-part interview with Shuler, author of "The Lowcountry Murder of Gwendolyn  Elaine Fogle: A Cold Case Solved", out now from Arcadia Publishing.For decades, evidence of the 1978 murder of Gwendolyn Elaine Fogle lay in the evidence room at the Walterboro Police Department. Investigators periodically revisited the case over the years, but it remained the department’s top cold case for thirty-seven years. Special Agent Lieutenant Rita Shuler worked on the case shortly after she joined the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED), and she couldn’t let it go, not even after her retirement in 2001. In May 2015, Lieutenant Shuler teamed up with new investigator Corporal Gean Johnson, and together they uncovered key evidence that had been overlooked. With new advancements in DNA and fingerprint technology, they brought the case to its end in just four months. Join host Ben Morris as he interviews Rita Shuler, author of Murder in Pleasanton: Tina Faelz and the Search for Justice, published by The History Press. Find us on your favorite podcast provider, or on evergreenpodcasts.com.
Four decades after Jeannette DePalma's tragic death, authors Jesse P. Pollack and Mark Moran present the definitive account of the shocking Springfield township cold case. As Springfield residents decorated for Halloween in September 1972, the crime rate in the quiet, affluent township was at its lowest in years. That mood was shattered when the body of sixteen-year-old Jeannette DePalma was discovered in the local woods, allegedly surrounded by strange objects. Some feared witchcraft was to blame, while others believed a serial killer was on the loose. Rumors of a police cover up ran rampant, and the case went unsolved - along with the murders of several other young women. Jesse P. Pollack is a New Jersey native who has served as a contributing writer and correspondent for Weird NJ magazine since 2001. In addition to Death on the Devil's Teeth, Pollack is the author of The Acid King (Simon & Schuster, 2018) and co-directed a 2021 documentary of the same name. Pollack is the co-host of Podcast 1289, the True Crime Movie Club podcast and the Devil's Teeth podcast. Mark Moran graduated from Parsons School of Design. In the early 1990s, Moran teamed up with Mark Sceurman to create Weird NJ magazine, the ultimate travel guide to New Jersey's local legends and best-kept secrets. The magazine has since spawned several books and a History Channel television series. Moran and Sceurman can be seen on the Travel Channel television series Paranormal Caught on Camera. Buy the book HERE
Congratulations to Crime Capsule for reaching 100 episodes. Today, we're celebrating returning a former guest, Kate Zaliznock, author of The San Francisco Doodler Murders. In 1974, one of San Francisco's most horrific unsolved serial murder cases began. In less than two years, the man police called "The Doodler'? took at least five lives, terrorized the LGBTQ community, and left three survivors forever changed. Initial reports claimed the murderer didn't approach his victims with the knife he used to kill them but that the suspect shared skilled drawings--sketches of faces and animals--before leaving several gay men to bleed out in the sands of Ocean Beach. Police investigations and activist efforts to uncover the killer led to several suspects but no definitive identification of the artist of death. Author Kate Zaliznock shines a light on this riveting cold case.
Celebrating 100 episodes, host Benjamin Morris reflects on milestones and the journey to reaching this momentous occasion. He acknowledges the support of Christen Thompson from Arcadia and the History Press, who played a pivotal role in bringing the podcast to life. Join the celebration as they delve into the backstory of how a simple idea evolved into a successful podcast.
100th Episode Teaser

100th Episode Teaser

2024-04-2503:03

Join Crime Capsule in celebrating their 100th episode milestone with a special birthday bash! Starting off with an exclusive interview with director Christen Thompson from the History Press, followed by updates from past guests on their cases. Get ready for promotions, giveaways, and a big birthday bash to wrap it all up. Tune in next week to join the celebration and hear from the team as they express their gratitude to partners and listeners for their support throughout the years.
Before the Flood The lost town of Sopris lies silently beneath the depths of Trinidad Lake. Once a thriving mining community in the late 1800s, it was renowned for abundant coal deposits and a bustling population. Three generations called Sopris home. They fought in the Civil War, homesteaded and immigrated to work in the mines. Unfortunately, the town's fate took a drastic turn with the construction of the Trinidad Dam, which flooded the area and submerged the town. Authors Genevieve Faoro-Johannsen and Robert Daniel Vigil, Jr. preserve an enduring legacy of community and resilience through first-hand accounts, historic photos and never-before-seen maps. Genevieve Faoro-Johannsen's Italian grandfather began his career working in the Sopris mine. Her grandmother was born in Sopris to a Sicilian immigrant. She graduated from Pueblo South High School and attended the University of St. Mary (Saint Mary College) in Leavenworth, Kansas, earning a Liberal Arts degree. Buy HERE
Before the Flood The lost town of Sopris lies silently beneath the depths of Trinidad Lake. Once a thriving mining community in the late 1800s, it was renowned for abundant coal deposits and a bustling population. Three generations called Sopris home. They fought in the Civil War, homesteaded and immigrated to work in the mines. Unfortunately, the town's fate took a drastic turn with the construction of the Trinidad Dam, which flooded the area and submerged the town. Authors Genevieve Faoro-Johannsen and Robert Daniel Vigil, Jr. preserve an enduring legacy of community and resilience through first-hand accounts, historic photos and never-before-seen maps. Genevieve Faoro-Johannsen's Italian grandfather began his career working in the Sopris mine. Her grandmother was born in Sopris to a Sicilian immigrant. She graduated from Pueblo South High School and attended the University of St. Mary (Saint Mary College) in Leavenworth, Kansas, earning a Liberal Arts degree. Buy HERE
People may associate Texas with cattle drives and oil derricks, but the sea has shaped the state's history as dramatically as it has delineated its coastline. Some of that history has vanished into the Gulf, whether it is an abandoned port town or a gale-tossed treasure fleet. Revisit the shipwreck that put Texas on the map. Add La Salle's lost colony, the Texas Navy's forgotten steamship and Galveston's overlooked 1915 hurricane to the navigational charts. From the submarines of Seawolf Park to the concrete tanker beached off Pelican Island, author Mark Lardas scours the coast to salvage the secrets of its sunken heritage. Buy the book HERE
People may associate Texas with cattle drives and oil derricks, but the sea has shaped the state's history as dramatically as it has delineated its coastline. Some of that history has vanished into the Gulf, whether it is an abandoned port town or a gale-tossed treasure fleet. Revisit the shipwreck that put Texas on the map. Add La Salle's lost colony, the Texas Navy's forgotten steamship and Galveston's overlooked 1915 hurricane to the navigational charts. From the submarines of Seawolf Park to the concrete tanker beached off Pelican Island, author Mark Lardas scours the coast to salvage the secrets of its sunken heritage. Buy the book HERE
Settlers came to Central Alabama in the early 1800s with big dreams. Miners panned the streams and combed the hillsides of the state's Gold Belt, hoping to strike it rich. Arbacooche and Goldville were forged by the rush on land and gold, along with Cahaba, the first state capital. Demand for the abundant cotton led to the establishment of factories like Pepperell Mills, Russell Manufacturing Company, Tallassee Mills, Avondale Mills and Daniel Pratt Cotton Gin. Owners built mill villages for their workers, setting the standard for other companies as well. But when booms go bust, they leave ghost towns in their wake. Author Peggy Jackson Walls walks the empty streets of these once lively towns, reviving the stories of the people who built and abandoned them. Peggy Walls is a member of several historical, lineage and writing societies: Tohopeka Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, Alabama Historical Association, Tallapoosee Historical Society, Alabama Writers' Forum, National League of American Penwomen, Alabama's Writers Conclave and Alabama State Poetry Association. She earned an undergraduate degree in secondary education from AUM and a Master of Arts degree and postgraduate Professional Educators Certification from Auburn University. Her interests are history and lineage research, poetry and art. She is the author of Alabama Gold, a History of the South's Last Mother Lode (2016). She has written articles for journals, the Alabama Review and Alabama Heritage, as well as multiple news articles. Purchase HERE
Settlers came to Central Alabama in the early 1800s with big dreams. Miners panned the streams and combed the hillsides of the state's Gold Belt, hoping to strike it rich. Arbacooche and Goldville were forged by the rush on land and gold, along with Cahaba, the first state capital. Demand for the abundant cotton led to the establishment of factories like Pepperell Mills, Russell Manufacturing Company, Tallassee Mills, Avondale Mills and Daniel Pratt Cotton Gin. Owners built mill villages for their workers, setting the standard for other companies as well. But when booms go bust, they leave ghost towns in their wake. Author Peggy Jackson Walls walks the empty streets of these once lively towns, reviving the stories of the people who built and abandoned them. Peggy Walls is a member of several historical, lineage and writing societies: Tohopeka Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, Alabama Historical Association, Tallapoosee Historical Society, Alabama Writers' Forum, National League of American Penwomen, Alabama's Writers Conclave and Alabama State Poetry Association. She earned an undergraduate degree in secondary education from AUM and a Master of Arts degree and postgraduate Professional Educators Certification from Auburn University. Her interests are history and lineage research, poetry and art. She is the author of Alabama Gold, a History of the South's Last Mother Lode (2016). She has written articles for journals, the Alabama Review and Alabama Heritage, as well as multiple news articles. Purchase HERE
Lost Cities Teaser

Lost Cities Teaser

2024-02-2202:01

Join us in 2 weeks for our new series on Lost Cities.
Blanketed by forests, dotted by lakes, crisscrossed by rivers and surrounded by Great Lakes, Michigan is a good place to hide secrets, bury bodies and stash evidence. Dig deep enough, and you will unearth something sinister. Is the suicide note of a prominent Detroit physician also a confession to murder? Were inmates unlawfully released from Jackson State Penitentiary to carry out a contract killing on a politician before he could turn State's evidence? Who silenced a fiery radio personality known as "the voice of the people'?? Did a notorious serial killer stalk women in Lansing during the 1970s? Join true crime author Tobin T. Buhk as he excavates some of the most vexing unsolved crimes in Michigan history. Buy the book HERE
Blanketed by forests, dotted by lakes, crisscrossed by rivers and surrounded by Great Lakes, Michigan is a good place to hide secrets, bury bodies and stash evidence. Dig deep enough, and you will unearth something sinister. Is the suicide note of a prominent Detroit physician also a confession to murder? Were inmates unlawfully released from Jackson State Penitentiary to carry out a contract killing on a politician before he could turn State's evidence? Who silenced a fiery radio personality known as "the voice of the people'?? Did a notorious serial killer stalk women in Lansing during the 1970s? Join true crime author Tobin T. Buhk as he excavates some of the most vexing unsolved crimes in Michigan history.
Nearly two decades after the fact, tragedy meets justice. One day in 1987, Fred Wilkerson up and vanished in Troup County, Georgia. It was a mystery beset with suspicious circumstances, but the evidence never led anywhere, and the case went cold, Wilkerson's whereabouts unknown. That is, until a remarkable set of circumstances allowed author and investigator Clay Bryant to breathe life back into the case nearly two decades later. Diving into what had previously been overlooked, Bryant was able to locate and recover Wilkerson's remains and successfully prosecute the killer, who'd crafted a calculating plot to take everything the victim had and murder him to keep it. The story concludes with the Wilkerson Family finally getting closure and the killer getting sentenced to life in prison. Join Byrant as he unravels this West Georgia cold case. Lewis Clayton (Clay) Bryant was born and raised in Troup County, Georgia, and began his career in law enforcement in 1973 as a radio operator with the Georgia State Patrol. In 1976, at twenty-one, he became the youngest trooper on the Georgia State Patrol. In 1980, he became police chief of Hogansville and stayed in that position for twelve years until resigning in 1992 and entering the private sector. He has been recognized as the most prolific cold case investigator in the United States for single-event homicides. His cases have been chronicled on 48 Hours Investigates, Bill Curtis's Cold Case Files, and Discovery ID Murder Book and featured in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, as well as articles in many local and regional newspapers. Buy the book HERE.
Nearly two decades after the fact, tragedy meets justice. One day in 1987, Fred Wilkerson up and vanished in Troup County, Georgia. It was a mystery beset with suspicious circumstances, but the evidence never led anywhere, and the case went cold, Wilkerson's whereabouts unknown. That is, until a remarkable set of circumstances allowed author and investigator Clay Bryant to breathe life back into the case nearly two decades later. Diving into what had previously been overlooked, Bryant was able to locate and recover Wilkerson's remains and successfully prosecute the killer, who'd crafted a calculating plot to take everything the victim had and murder him to keep it. The story concludes with the Wilkerson Family finally getting closure and the killer getting sentenced to life in prison. Join Byrant as he unravels this West Georgia cold case. Lewis Clayton (Clay) Bryant was born and raised in Troup County, Georgia, and began his career in law enforcement in 1973 as a radio operator with the Georgia State Patrol. In 1976, at twenty-one, he became the youngest trooper on the Georgia State Patrol. In 1980, he became police chief of Hogansville and stayed in that position for twelve years until resigning in 1992 and entering the private sector. He has been recognized as the most prolific cold case investigator in the United States for single-event homicides. His cases have been chronicled on 48 Hours Investigates, Bill Curtis's Cold Case Files, and Discovery ID Murder Book and featured in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, as well as articles in many local and regional newspapers. Buy the book HERE.
Muncie epitomizes the small-town America of squeaky-clean 1950s sitcoms, but its wholesome veneer conceals a violent past. Public scandals and personal tragedy dogged the long, notorious life of Dr. Jules LaDuron. Baseball ace Obie McCracken met a tragic and violent end after joining the police force. A mother's love could not stop James Hedges from committing murder. The paranoid delusions of Leonard Redden hounded him until one day he carried a shotgun into a quiet classroom. And newsman George Dale's showdown with the Klan prepared him for the political fight of his life. Douglas Walker and Keith Roysdon, authors of Wicked Muncie, introduce a new cast of characters from the city's notorious past. For most of the past four decades, veteran journalist Douglas Walker has covered the criminal justice system in East Central Indiana for the Star Press and its predecessor, the Muncie Evening Press . He has received dozens of awards for writing, investigative reporting and public service, many the result of collaborations with reporter Keith Roysdon, with whom he also wrote a weekly column on Muncie politics for many years. This marks the duo's fourth book on crime and justice in Muncie and Delaware County. Keith Roysdon is a lifelong Indiana resident who now lives in Tennessee. He has won more than thirty state and national first-place awards for journalism, many for work cowritten by Douglas Walker. Their third book, The Westside Park Murders , was named Best Nonfiction Book of 2021 by the Indiana Society of Professional Journalists. Roysdon's crime novel Seven Angels won the 2021 Hugh Holton Award for Best Unpublished Novel from Mystery Writers of America Midwest.
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