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šŸŽ¤Follow us on Twitter: @TheChessAngleā™ŸThis podcast is sponsored by Chessable.Ā  Chessable uses science-backed learning and the concept of spaced repetition to ensure retention. Check out their courses today!ā™ŸGrandmaster John Emms is a distinguished chess professional. He is one of the UK's top players, as well as a prolific writer, educator, and chess coach. The bulk of our conversation focused on his amazing (and highly recommended) book, The Survival Guide to Competitive Chess (Amazon).Ā  Club players and adult improvers of all levels should find our discussionĀ  highly beneficial. John reviews several topics from the book and offers practical strategies for tournament play at the amateur level.Some of our talking points include:The CEM (check every move) methodAvoiding high risk/low reward tacticsBluffing & The Poker FaceConverting winning positionsDraw offers & "draw by reputation"Choosing an opening repertoireClock control & time managementLong think, wrong thinkInternet & blitz chessJohn's Twitter page: @GMJohnEmmsšŸ“šVisit John's Amazon.com Author Page for a full list of titlesšŸ“šSelected works by GM John Emms:The Survival Guide to Rook EndingsThe Ultimate Chess Puzzle BookStarting Out: The Queen's IndianStarting Out: The SicilianEasy Guide to the Nimzo-IndianDiscovering Chess Openings : Building a repertoire from basic principlesMore Simple Chess: Moving on from the Basic PrinciplesThis episode is our Season 2 Finale. Season 3 begins September 2022. The Amazon links above are affiliate links, which earn us a commission on qualifying purchases. This helps support the podcast at no additional cost to you. Our links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
šŸŽ¤Follow us on Twitter: @TheChessAngleā™ŸThis podcast is sponsored by Chessable.Ā  Chessable uses science-backed learning and the concept of spaced repetition to ensure retention. Check out their courses today!ā™ŸThis episode is a discussion of common endgame ideas, themes, and mistakes at the club level.Mentioned: Four Thousand Weeks by Oliver Burkeman (Amazon)Recommended Resources:Silman's Complete Endgame Course by Jeremy Silman (Amazon)Pandolfini's Endgame Course by Bruce Pandolfini (Amazon)The Amazon links above are affiliate links, which earn us a commission on qualifying purchases. This helps support the podcast at no additional cost to you.Our links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
šŸŽ¤Follow us on Twitter: @TheChessAngleā™ŸThis podcast is sponsored by Chessable.Ā  Chessable uses science-backed learning and the concept of spaced repetition to ensure retention. Check out their courses today!ā™ŸThis episode explores possible reasons why your rating is not increasing. It may have little to do with study time or knowledge of chess theory. Our links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
šŸŽ¤Follow us on Twitter: @TheChessAngleā™ŸThis podcast is sponsored by Chessable.Ā  Chessable uses science-backed learning and the concept of spaced repetition to ensure retention. Check out their courses today!ā™ŸThe London System has become one of the most popular openings for White. While it's a staple at amateur events, many top players use it as well, including GMs Magnus Carlsen, Gata Kamsky, Simon Williams, and Anish Giri. The London System is easy to learn yet very sound and solid. It can lead to slow positional play or dynamic attacking play. The London can be used as a complete opening repertoire for White or as an occasional surprise against an unsuspecting opponent. Regardless, Black can easily get crushed if he's not careful or plays on autopilot. Some of this episode's talking points include the following:"System" openings definedWhat exactly is the London System?Why the London is so effective at the amateur levelAddressing criticism of the London SystemBasic themes and conceptsComments on the recommended resources belowRecommended Resources:The London System in 12 Practical Lessons by Oscar De Prado (Amazon)The London System for the Busy Chess Player by GM Simon Williams (chess.com)Tips & Tricks of the London System by GM Aman Hambleton (chess.com)The Agile London System by GM Alfonso Romero & FM Oscar De Prado (chessable)The Jobava London System by GM Simon Williams (chessable)While I currently recommend the recent De Prado book above as your starting point (as far as physical books), you should be aware of the seminal text Win With the London System by Johnsen & Kovacevic (Amazon), which contains both illustrative games and an in-depth analytical section.The resources above include affiliate links, which earn us a commission on qualifying purchases. This helps support the podcast at no additional cost to you.Our links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
šŸŽ¤Be sure to follow us on Twitter: @TheChessAngleā™ŸThis podcast is sponsored by Chessable.Ā  Chessable uses science-backed learning and the concept of spaced repetition to ensure retention. Check out their courses today!ā™ŸThe French Defense (1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5) is one of the most respected openings for Black, and is particularly effective at the amateur level. This is recommended as a complete repertoire against 1. e4. Some of this episode's talking points include:Why amateurs should avoid the Sicilian defense (1...c5) and open games (1. e4 e5)Ā Why the French Defense is so effective at the club levelThree variations that will cover 95% of your games versus 1. e4Some additional thoughts about confidence and patienceRecommended Resources:Starting Out: The French by Byron Jacobs (Amazon)Why Simon Loves the French Defense by GM Simon Williams (chess.com)Master the French Defense by NM Bryan Tillis & GM Alex Lenderman (Chessable)The resources above include affiliate links, which earn us a commission on qualifying purchases. This helps support the podcast at no additional cost to you.Our links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
šŸŽ¤Be sure to follow us on Twitter: @TheChessAngleā™ŸThis podcast is sponsored by Chessable.Ā  Chessable uses science-backed learning and the concept of spaced repetition to ensure retention. Check out their courses today!ā™ŸThis week I spoke with my friend Jay Kleinman, a fellow chess amateur and social worker in NY. Jay recounted some fascinating experiences from the amateur tournament scene, and an overriding theme in our conversation was how becoming a parent changes the narrative of adult improvement. Some of our talking point include:The unfortunate decline of OTB post-mortem analysisThe dangers of mimicking super-GMsHow Jay almost gave a lesson to the late William Lombardy (Fischer's coach)Jay's encounters with some now-famous GMs ("I knew them when...")Chess improvement beyond parentingOpening choicesOur links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
šŸŽ¤Be sure to follow us on Twitter: @TheChessAngleā™ŸThis podcast is sponsored by Chessable.Ā  Check out their courses today!ā™ŸHappy Father's Day to all the chess dads out there! In this episode, I will discuss the chess thought process through the lens of two of my recent OTB games. Some of the talking points include:Confidence against higher-rated opponentsTrusting your analysisPlaying experience vs. studyingA suggested tip for the opening phaseOur links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com
šŸŽ¤Be sure to follow us on Twitter: @TheChessAngle ā™ŸThis podcast is sponsored by Chessable. Neal is currently enjoying the course entitled The Agile London System, based on the book of the same name.ā™ŸWe've all been there: the opponent who won't sit still or who keeps adjusting every piece. Distracting behavior at the chess board can be so infuriating that it adversely affects your results. In this episode, we discuss many of these behaviors and offer some solutions (hint: SAY SOMETHING to your opponent or call the TD over). Some of the behaviors mentioned include:repeated draw offersincessant fidgeting"acknowledgers" and "sighers"tappinghand hoveringOur links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
ā™ŸWe are happy to announce our new collaboration with Chessable, who is now a sponsor of this podcast. Neal is currently enjoying the course entitled The Agile London System, based on the book of the same name.ā™ŸšŸŽ¤Be sure to follow us on Twitter: @TheChessAngleĀ For this interview episode, I spoke with USCF Expert Jarrod Tavares. Jarrod is an amateur/club player who has achieved tournament success with an unconventional, anti-book style. Amateur players and adult improvers of all levels should find this conversation enlightening and provocative. Some of our talking points include:Should the London System be banned from chess?šŸ˜‰Endgame theory and the amateur playerMaking unconventional moves to get into your opponent's headThe importance of confidenceThe psychology of draw offersOur links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
šŸŽ¤NEW Twitter page for the podcast: @TheChessAngle šŸŽ¤Be sure to follow us!While some favor slower time controls, blitz & rapid games are more popular than ever, mainly due to the explosion of online chess. Can speed chess actually help you in slow games and improve your chess overall? National Master Tyrell Harriott believes it can. Tyrell is very active in the New York chess scene and runs the Kings of Queens Chess Club. He also streams on his YouTube channel. Tyrell shared some great insight on the benefits of speed chess, as well as his approach to playing and his thought process. Some of our talking points include:Chess in the parks of New York CityThe importance of time delay/incrementsMindset & attitudeUsing a consistent opening repertoireHow quick time controls can help you improveOur links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
Are you constantly comparing your chess progress to that of others? Are four, five, or six-hour-a-day study plans effective for amateur players? I offer opinions on these topics and more. The segments in this episode include:The "tournament hall" vs. the "study hall"Handling decision fatigue from all the available study materialThe essential areas of focus for beginnersOTB vs. online strategyThe comparison gameTalent vs. hard workIs studying several hours a day actually necessary at the amateur/club level?Mentioned: The Amateur's Mind (Amazon)The link above is an affiliate link, which earns us a commission on qualifying purchases. This helps support the podcast at no additional cost to youOur links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
This episode is a book review/discussion of the acclaimed text The Seven Deadly Chess Sins (Amazon) by Jonathan Rowson. This is a follow up to Episode 16 which discussed Chess for TigersĀ (Amazon) by Simon Webb. I believe these two outstanding books are probably the only resources you need for chess psychology at the amateur and club level. Chess for Tigers is an excellent primer, while The Seven Deadly Chess Sins is more advanced. The seven chess sins include the following:Thinking (erroneously)BlinkingWantingMaterialismEgoismPerfectionismLoosenessAll links above are affiliate links, which earn us a commission on qualifying purchases. This helps support the podcast at no additional cost to you.Our links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
Grandmaster Romain Edouard joins the podcast this week to explain how players of all levels can minimize mistakes in their games. Be sure to check out Romain's chess.com lesson on this subject (affiliate link), as well as his chessable course on facing the English opening (1.c4). You may also want to check out The Immortal Game platform. I caught up with Romain during his current visit to the US for his stint as GM in Residence for the St. Louis Chess Club.Ā Ā Romain's books discussed in this episode:The Chess Manual of Avoidable MistakesChess Calculation Training (bundle)My Magic Years with TopalovAs mentioned, Romain is offering Chess Angle listeners a discount on all books from his website, thinkerspublishing.com. Use the code ROMAIN15 to receive 15% off all books from the site. This discount does not apply to sale items or bundles. Affiliate links earn us a commission on qualifying purchases. This helps support the podcast at no additional cost to you.Our links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
This is the second episode in our Game Analysis Series where I thematically discuss one or more of my OTB games. Some of the concepts from this episode include:Positional ideas vs. tacticsAdults vs. kidsUnconventional openingsThoughtless one-move attacksAs mentioned in this episode, please follow us on Twitter and comment on our pinned post about your rating goal for 12/31/22.Our links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
For this interview episode, I spoke with Fide Master Roger LaFlair.Ā  Roger teaches high school chemistry and chess at a private school here on Long Island in NY.Ā  He also has an active roster of private chess students.Ā  Roger can be reached at rlaflair@gmail.com.Ā  We touched on a variety of topics regarding tournament play and chess improvement.Ā  Some of our talking points include:The dangers of "me chess"Awareness of your opponent's ideasAvoiding impulsivity & impatienceThe London System for club/amateur playersChess educationOur links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
This episode details some of my experiences as a club player and tournament director in three parts:Why I started the Long Island Chess ClubWhat it's like directing and playing in the same tournamentSome funny stories from the clubOur links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com Intrinsic Driveā„¢This show was born of a desire to explore and share individual and collective...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Ā  Spotify
This is the first episode for our new Game Analysis Series. I will thematically break down one or more of my OTB games, covering a variety of chess concepts and ideas for the amateur and club player. Some of the themes from this episode include:Why you shouldn't fear higher-rated opponentsHow to play against lower-rated opponentsHow to handle draw offersThe French Defense advance variation Ā Our links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com
This week I spoke with National Master Alex King who resides in Memphis, Tennessee. Alex is an active tournament player, teacher, and writer. His 6-part article series for Chess Life magazine on the Tarrasch DefenseĀ  begins with the March 2022 issue. Alex is also an accomplished musician, and he composed and performed all the music in this episode. Some of our talking points include:Chess improvement tips for amateursThe prevalence of chess cheatingThe relationship between music and chessAlex's links & info:Marshall Spectator articlechess.com: AlexanderKinglichess: OjaiJoaoE-mail: snarkusmusic@gmail.com Our links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com
I spoke with Candidate Master and renowned chess educator Brian Karen. He is one of the most active teachers in the country. Some of our talking points include:Tournament players vs. hobbyistsA rating system based on norms, rather than individual gamesStudying chessDoes preparing for a specific opponent actually make a difference at the club level?Links referenced in this episode:Chess Book Collectors FB GroupFide World Chess Championship FB GroupThe Seven Deadly Chess Sins (affiliate link)Chess for Tigers (affiliate link) Brian's email: briankaren@usa.net Our links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com
Arguably, certain "theoretical advantages" often have less significance at the amateur level. For example, material imbalances such as "having the two bishops" or "being up the Exchange" are often overrated when non-titled players face off. Our Links:WebsiteTwitterFacebookE-mail: info@thechessangle.com
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