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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

858 Episodes
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States and cities across the United States are reporting dangerous shortages of the vital medical supplies needed to contain the coronavirus. Why is the world’s biggest economy suffering such a scramble to find lifesaving equipment?Guest: Sarah Kliff, an investigative reporter covering health care for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The scarcity of ventilators has become an emergency, forcing doctors to make life-or-death decisions. The collapse of a government effort to produce an emergency stockpile reveals much about the challenges now being faced in fighting the pandemic.This map of the United States shows gaps in the existing health care infrastructure — and which areas may face a shortage of hospital beds as the virus spreads.
Back From the Brink

Back From the Brink

2020-03-3033:5738

Across the United States, many hospitals are confronting their first cases of coronavirus. Today, we speak to New Jersey’s first confirmed coronavirus patient, a medical professional, about what having the virus was like for him, what he learned from the experience and why he thinks, “America is not ready.”Guests: Susan Dominus, a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine, spoke with James Cai, a physician assistant. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: James Cai was told his test for coronavirus had not been completed. Then he heard from the governor on the news that he was the first confirmed case in New Jersey. Why states must ask knotty questions about how much to tell the public — and when.President Trump, listening to his health advisers, has said that the country should be practicing social distancing until at least the end of April. Here are the latest updates.
After weeks of caring for her sick husband, our colleague wanted to write an essay about her family’s battle against the coronavirus — a warning to those in isolation who haven’t experienced the ravages of the virus intimately. Today, we read her letter from the future aloud.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
Jody Rosen, a writer for The Times Magazine, transports us into his current soundtrack. From Alberta Hunter's “voice of longevity” to the “transfixing performance” of Missy Elliott, Jody shares the music that’s helping him find new rhythms — during these days stuck inside.Music discussed:“My Castle’s Rockin’” by Alberta Hunter“I’ll Get By” by Nick Lucas“Lick Shots” by Missy Elliott“Simply Beautiful” by Al Green
Over the last few weeks, children have called into “The Daily” with a lot of questions about the coronavirus: How did the virus get on earth? What color is coronavirus? And can dogs get it? Today, we try to answer them. Guest: Carl Zimmer, science reporter and author of the “Matter” column for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Do your children still have more questions? Here’s a guide on how to talk to them about the coronavirus.With many kids home from school, we have some tips for creating structure around your children’s school days, and some recommendations for podcasts to help keep little ones occupied — and learning.
A Historic Stimulus Bill

A Historic Stimulus Bill

2020-03-2630:4147

To rescue the American economy in the coronavirus crisis, Congress is on the verge of adopting the most expensive stimulus bill in U.S. history. But how much is the battle over this measure being influenced by the last financial crisis? Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, the congressional editor of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The bill promises a $1,200 payout to millions of Americans, increased jobless aid and grants to save small businesses from permanent closure. Here’s what it means for you.
Last week, President Trump called himself a “wartime president” as he faced up to the threat caused by the coronavirus. But only days later — and with the crisis escalating — he has abandoned that message. What changed?Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Despite the warnings, President Trump said he believed a crippled economy and forced social isolation would inflict more harm than the spread of the virus.Mr. Trump is now facing a personal dilemma as he responds to the crisis: How can he save his campaign for re-election when so much is suddenly going so wrong?The White House and Congress have reached a $2 trillion stimulus deal, the biggest such package in modern American history. The plan would offer jobless benefits to individuals and direct cash payments to taxpayers.
So far, the United States has been losing the battle against the pandemic, with a patchwork of inconsistent measures across the country proving unequal to halting the spread of the virus. Today, we ask: What will it take to change the course of the crisis?Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump has played down the threat of the virus, while at least 16 states institute stay-at-home orders. Here are the latest updates.The rampant spread of the coronavirus has left a trail of loss across most people’s lives. Here is some advice on how to cope.
Two weeks ago, the biggest story in the country was the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. Now, with the dramatic onset of the coronavirus crisis, the primary has largely gone off the radar. Today, we talk to Alexander Burns, a political reporter at The New York Times, about what happened when those two stories collided. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: In a presidential debate without an in-person audience earlier this month, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Senator Bernie Sanders clashed over how to handle the coronavirus crisis. With so much news, you may have missed the debate — here are six takeaways to catch you up.Mr. Sanders is now reassessing his campaign as Mr. Biden plans for the nomination, announcing he will pick a woman as his running mate should he be chosen as the candidate.
On this special episode of “The Daily,” one magazine writer reflects on life’s unpredictability and shares her story of a hospital error that scrambled two pairs of Colombian identical twins. This is the story of how the four brothers found one another — and of what happened next.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
On this special episode of “The Daily,” Kevin Roose, a tech reporter for The Times, shares what he’s realized after a week in self-isolation: The internet has become kinder. From virtual birthday parties and singalongs, to happy hours and yoga classes, people are pulling together on the internet, in real time, all over the world. We listen in on what that sounds like.
Across America, businesses are scaling back, firing workers and shutting their doors because of the coronavirus. New York’s Chinatown has been experiencing a downturn for weeks as anxiety and discrimination affected business. Now, the state government has mandated nonessential businesses in the city keep 75 percent of their workers home. So what did it sound like as one of the busiest cities in the world ground to a halt? Five producers at “The Daily,” Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Jessica Cheung, Daniel Guillemette and Andy Mills, spoke to small business owners to find out. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: With so many businesses being forced to close, some indefinitely, claims for jobless benefits surged 33 percent last week. Here are the latest updates on the crisis and its impact on daily life across America.As so much of life begins to shift, we have answers to some common questions about the coronavirus crisis.
New Rochelle, a suburb north of New York City, has one of the largest clusters of coronavirus infections in the U.S. We visited the community to find out how the containment measures were being implemented and how successful they have been. On today’s episode: Sarah Maslin Nir, a breaking news reporter at The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York created a “containment zone” in New Rochelle last week, hoping to curb the spread of the virus in “the single most troubling area in the state.” Soon after, the National Guard arrived to help implement the measures.New York is among about 10 states that have set up drive-through testing centers, as state and local leaders try to figure out how to safely screen more people.
New York was one of the earliest states with confirmed cases of coronavirus, and it now has the most confirmed infections in the U.S. To control the outbreak, the authorities have begun taking increasingly drastic steps, including closing schools and businesses. Today, we talk with the governor, Andrew M. Cuomo, to hear about how he is handling the crisis.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Life in New York, a city of 8.6 million people and an economic engine for the country, is grinding to a shocking halt.The White House issued plans for an economic stimulus that included sending $1,000 to every American. In Europe, leaders voted to seal the borders of 26 countries. Here are the latest updates on the spread of the virus.
On Monday, President Trump announced sweeping new guidelines to control the spread of the coronavirus. Among them: encouraging Americans to work from home and to avoid gatherings of more than 10 people. We look at a report that may have inspired the president’s change in tone — and whether U.S. hospitals are prepared for the potentially staggering projections.“The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories.
‘It’s Like a War’

‘It’s Like a War’

2020-03-1724:2375

Italy has become the epicenter of the pandemic’s European migration, with nearly 30,000 infections and more than 2,000 deaths in just a few weeks. These numbers are soaring by the day, even after the government took extreme measures to lock down much of the country. Now, the U.S. surgeon general is warning that America is on a strikingly similar path. Today, we speak to one Italian doctor triaging patients north of Milan about the road that may lie ahead. Guest: Dr. Fabiano Di Marco, a professor at the University of Milan who is also the head of the respiratory unit of the Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII in Bergamo, a nearby town. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: In less than three weeks, the virus has overloaded hospitals in northern Italy, leaving doctors to decide who lives and who dies. Now, with the country on lockdown, families are having to delay the burial of their loved ones.President Trump released suggested guidelines to control the virus, stopping short of the mandatory lockdown now in place in Italy. Here are the latest updates on the crisis.We hope you are well, wherever you are. Here are a few tips on staying safe and coping in this moment.
In past financial crises, central banks across the world developed a time-tested tool kit to rescue national economies. So why don’t previous interventions seem to be working this time? Guest: Peter S. Goodman, who writes about the economy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The Federal Reserve cut interest rates to near zero and said it would buy hundreds of billions of dollars in U.S. government debt, moves reminiscent of its actions during the 2008 financial crisis.The coronavirus is upending life as we know it — and news is changing rapidly. Here are the latest updates on school closings, travel restrictions and governmental directives.
On this special episode of “The Daily,” a magazine writer for The Times reflects on her experience interviewing Tom Hanks last fall — and on the generosity he showed her in a difficult personal moment. In this time of collective stress, we wanted to bring the story to you in audio as a reminder that “contagion is real, but it doesn’t just work for viruses,” our writer said. “It works for kind words and generous thoughts, and acts of selflessness and honesty.”This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
We’re in a moment that feels scary, uncertain and unsettling, and may feel this way for a while. While we’ll continue to cover the coronavirus pandemic until it’s over, we realize that this time requires more than news and information. We also need release — and relief. And we’ll do our best to provide that in the coming weeks. To start, we asked a few of our colleagues at The Times to share what’s bringing them comfort right now. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Guests:Taffy Brodesser-Akner reads from “Love in the Time of Cholera” by Gabriel García Márquez.Wesley Morris reads from “In Pursuit of Flavor” by Edna Lewis.Dean Baquet reads from “On Living in an Atomic Age” by C.S. Lewis.
Now that the coronavirus is a pandemic, with both infections and deaths surging in many places across the world, we return to a reporter who has covered the story from the start and ask him how best to navigate this new reality. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The World Health Organization now describes the coronavirus as a pandemic, and the number of cases continues to rise worldwide. These basic steps can help you reduce your risk of getting sick or infecting others.The global pandemic is affecting many aspects of daily life. Here are the latest updates on school closures, social distancing measures and event cancellations.
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Comments (3280)

Jessie Bananas

The narrator for the show needs to learn how to speed up his sentences. He takes a pause in between each word. it's extremely annoying and reminds me of the sloth.

Mar 31st
Reply

marry rahmani

As medical profeasional this felt pretty biased . Covid19 is a new virus but viral pneumonias are not . doctors understand saturation levels . they know about the medication , they know about the risk vs benefits of medication . all Covid19 medication are not specifically designed for this virus and can cause serious complications . As a rule the main defence against any virus is the person own immune system even with the very well known flu , trials are still going on about how much medecation can help. The main treatment is supportive measures and give the body time to do the rest . This interview has disregarded doctors experince and medical knowledge and is disrespectful to medical professionals treating james .

Mar 31st
Reply

Jay Rok

good story but sounds pretty scripted

Mar 31st
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John Smith

"Nobody in the hospital had any experience dealing with this disease"....??? WHAT? Except every doctor in the hospital who has limitless access to the world wide web and every medical journal entry from the very beginning of the outbreak.... NYT 👏👏 bravo... you guys are IDIOTS...

Mar 30th
Reply (1)

John Smith

what will the liberals have to complain about today...

Mar 30th
Reply (6)

ID17606932

He got better after the drugs he didn’t get better on his own...

Mar 30th
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WatchDawg

I'm tired of the whispering. unsub

Mar 30th
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Katherine Sinkler

I'm really thankful that she was able and willing to share her experience. We are all experiencing this somehow and someway; we often forget that the people we hear about on the news could so easily be us or our loved ones.

Mar 30th
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Frank Dusek

every one should listen to this

Mar 29th
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Stephen A Witmer

Apparently she didn't learn anything helpful, and the doctors know nothing. So here you go, stay healthy, it's not hard. 99% of COVID-19 deaths are already sick or diseased. Doctors are involved in sick care, they can't keep you healthy. Do your own research: keto diet, fasting, supplements, placebo (beliefs) exercise. It's our health, we need to educate ourselves about it!

Mar 29th
Reply (4)

Lis Stanger

Thank you for another excellent Podcast

Mar 28th
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ID17633314

I loved these honest questions from kids. For some reason I felt more hopeful. And I thought the answers were helpful and remarkably appropriate for children. Thank you both.

Mar 27th
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John Smith

how can these dipshits at the NYT call him a racist for halting flights from china one day, then say he did nothing to respond the next. You people are disgusting filthy frauds.

Mar 27th
Reply (1)

Maria Fattore

You who believe this is a hoax, note: I lost a friend yesterday. He was 40, an emergency room nurse , working at Mt Sinai West in midtown. They have been using trash bags and paper towels for protection, as they no longer have protective supplies. If you believe this is a hoax, you also obviously do not believe in scientific data and missed the chapter on critical thinking. This is truly virulent-- the NYC numbers do not lie. We are terrified here.

Mar 26th
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Receiptracker G

Dark but straight talk

Mar 26th
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Ivan

This was blunt straight talk needed to wake people up. Some will always refuse to listen and then it'll be too late for them.

Mar 25th
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CraggyPete

#Trump2020 hell yea I'll be at church for Easter, we gonna be dying eggs too, libz can't take that away from us! This hoax needs to end now #demhoax

Mar 25th
Reply (2)

Devendra Kazak

this is fear mongering. "bodies lining the streets"

Mar 24th
Reply (2)

Carol Reed

This was an excellent episode. Every American should hear.. it's that important.

Mar 24th
Reply

Sara Hlynosky

he pronounced the capital of Montana wrong. :/

Mar 24th
Reply (1)
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