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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

928 Episodes
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Note: This episode contains strong language. Today, we’re sharing the series finale of “Rabbit Hole,” a Times podcast with the tech columnist Kevin Roose. In this episode, we follow one QAnon believer’s journey through faith and loss — and what becomes of reality as our lives move online. For more information on “Rabbit Hole” and today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole. 
Why They're Protesting

Why They're Protesting

2020-06-0536:2927

This episode includes disturbing language including racial slurs.They came together to protest the killing of George Floyd — and because what happened to him had echoes in their own experiences. Today, we speak with five protesters about the moments in their lives that brought them onto the streets.Guests: Donfard Hubbard, 44, from Minneapolis; Rashaad Dinkins, 18, from Minneapolis; Joe Morris, 32, from Tallahassee, Fla.; Azalea Hernandez, 12, from Minneapolis; and Joyce Ladner, 76, from Washington. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 
This episode contains sounds of explosives and descriptions of violence.Today, we go inside a high-stakes White House debate over how President Trump should respond to reports that he was hiding in a bunker while the nation’s capital burned. This is the story of what happened in Lafayette Square. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Our chief White House correspondent explains why, when the history of the Trump presidency is written, the clash with protesters that preceded President Trump’s walk across Lafayette Square may be remembered as one of its defining moments.“He did not pray,” said Mariann E. Budde, the Episcopal bishop of Washington, said of Mr. Trump’s militarized visit to St. John’s church for a photo opportunity. “He did not mention George Floyd.”
The Mayor of Minneapolis

The Mayor of Minneapolis

2020-06-0329:1830

As nationwide protests about the death of George Floyd enter a second week, we speak with the leader of the city where they began. Guest: Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Mr. Frey came into office in 2018 on promises to fix the broken relationship between the community and law enforcement in the wake of two fatal police shootings. This is what he has done in the years since.
The Minneapolis police officer whose tactics led to George Floyd’s death had a long record of complaints against him. So why was he still on patrol? Guest: Shaila Dewan, a national reporter covering criminal justice for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Efforts to hold problem officers accountable often face resistance from unions, and juries are reluctant to second-guess police decisions.Violence escalated overnight in protests across the country, with police officers under fire in St. Louis and Las Vegas. Here are the latest updates.
This episode contains strong language.Demonstrations have erupted in at least 140 cities across the United States in the days since George Floyd, a black man, died in police custody in Minneapolis. We were on the ground in some of them, chronicling 72 hours of pain and protest. Guests: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes for The New York Times Magazine; John Eligon, a national correspondent who covers race for The Times; and Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: The video discussed by Nikole Hannah-Jones in the episode is featured here.The Times has reporters on the ground in dozens of cities across the country. Here’s a look at what they’re seeing.George Floyd died one week ago today. Here’s a timeline of what has happened since.
Note: This episode contains strong language. Today, we’re sharing Episode 7 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.In this episode, our reporter investigates the QAnon conspiracy theories. The story of QAnon believers, united in a battle against what they see as dark forces of the world, reveals where the internet is headed.For more information on “Rabbit Hole” and today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole.
As protests spread over the death of George Floyd, the former officer at the center of the case has been charged with murder. We listen in on the demonstrations, and examine why this tragedy — though too familiar — may be a turning point. Guest: Audra D. S. Burch, a national enterprise correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:Derek Chauvin, a former police officer, was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for kneeling on the neck of Mr. Floyd for nearly nine minutes as he repeatedly pleaded “I can’t breathe.”In the year before their fatal encounter, Mr. Floyd and Mr. Chauvin worked at the same nightclub.Protests over racism and police violence have erupted across the U.S. Follow the latest updates.
Barbara Krupke won the lottery. Fred Walter Gray enjoyed his bacon and hash browns crispy. Orlando Moncada crawled through a hole in a fence to reach the United States. John Prine chronicled the human condition. Cornelia Ann Hunt left the world with gratitude.Over 100,000 people have died from the coronavirus in the United States. Today, we glimpse inside the lives of just a few of them.Background reading: Memories collected from obituaries across the country help us visualize and reckon with the incalculable loss of more than 100,000 lives.
Space Travel, Privatized

Space Travel, Privatized

2020-05-2827:5617

After nearly a decade on the sidelines of space travel, Cape Canaveral is again launching a shuttle into space. But this time, a private company will be sending NASA astronauts into orbit. What does this moment mean for human exploration of the solar system? Guests: Kenneth Chang, a science reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Here’s a look inside the vessel that is scheduled to become the first crewed spacecraft launched in the United States since the end of the shuttle program in 2011.Meet SpaceX’s first NASA astronauts: Robert L. Behnken and Douglas G. Hurley, who have been friends and colleagues for two decades.
The U.S. Postal Service has survived the telegraph, the fax machine and the dawn of the internet. But will it survive coronavirus? Guests: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times and Derek Harpe, a Postal Service worker with a mail route in Mocksville, N.C. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: With the coronavirus threatening the Postal Service’s financial viability, a rescue for the organization has become a political battle.
Two brothers, Javier Morales, 48, and Martin Morales, 39, died of coronavirus within hours of each other in their adopted home of New Jersey. Their last wish was to be buried at home in Mexico, but, to make that happen, their family must navigate the vast bureaucracies of two countries, international airfare and the complications of a pandemic. Guest:Annie Correal, an immigration reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Shaila and Melanie Cruz Morales, twin sisters from New Jersey who are the men’s nieces. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: In Mexico, being buried near home is a sacred rite. These are the obstacles the Morales family has faced as they try to return their uncles’ bodies home.
Note: This episode contains strong language. Today, we’re sharing Episode 6 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.In this episode, we hear from PewDiePie, one of the biggest and most polarizing YouTube celebrities. He sat down with our reporter to discuss how he’s coming to grips with his influence — and looking to the future.If you're tuning in to “Rabbit Hole” for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole.
There are moments when the world we take for granted changes instantaneously — when reality is upended and replaced with the unimaginable. Though we try not to think about it, instability is always lurking, and at any moment, a kind of terrible magic can switch on and scramble our lives. You may know the feeling.In 1964, it happened to Anchorage, Alaska, and to a woman named Genie Chance. Today, the author Jon Mooallem tells her story — and the story of the biggest earthquake to hit North America in recorded history — using sonic postcards from the past.Guest: Jon Mooallem, author of the book “This Is Chance.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 
From the earliest days of the coronavirus outbreak, health officials believed that it was largely sparing children and teenagers. But the rise of a mysterious inflammatory syndrome — with symptoms ranging from rashes to heart failure — in children testing positive for the virus is challenging that belief. Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times, spoke with Jack McMorrow, 14, and his parents in Queens about his experience contracting the coronavirus. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: “If I send you home today, you’ll be dead by tomorrow.” This is what Jack heard after learning he had a mysterious illness connected to the coronavirus in children. “I would say that scared me to death but it more like scared me to life.”The new syndrome has been compared to a rare childhood illness called Kawasaki disease. But doctors have learned that it affects the heart differently and is appearing mostly in school-age children, rather than infants and toddlers.
Some have called the pandemic “the great equalizer.”  But the coronavirus is killing black Americans at staggeringly higher rates than white Americans. Today, we explore why. Guest: Linda Villarosa, a writer for The New York Times Magazine covering racial health disparities, who spoke to Nicole Charles in New Orleans, La. about the death of her husband, Cornell Charles, known as Dickey. He was 51. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: How Mardi Gras accelerated the spread of the coronavirus among an already vulnerable population in New Orleans.The coronavirus has killed black and Latino people in New York City at twice the rate that it has killed white people. Black Britons are also twice as likely to die from coronavirus.Black Americans can face subconscious bias from medical professionals when they seek care. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have advised health professionals to be on the lookout for such bias, but some say the issue is far more systemic.
It used to be rare for a president to fire an inspector general, a position created within government agencies after Watergate and assigned to fight waste and corruption. Today, we look at what President Trump’s pattern of replacing inspectors general reveals about the nature of the independent office — and about presidential power. Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Mr. Trump decided to fire Steve A. Linick, the Department of State’s inspector general, last week. Mr. Linick had opened an investigation into Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s spending habits. Congressional Democrats have now opened an investigation into the firing.The president also recently fired the intelligence community’s inspector general. Our chief White House correspondent explains why Mr. Trump’s drive against those he considers disloyal continues even during a pandemic.
As the American economy plunges toward a recession, economists and policymakers are triaging proposals to stanch the bleeding. All of their ideas will cost money the government doesn’t have. That leaves Democrats and Republicans with two major questions: How much should be borrowed for bailouts — and what spending is needed to avoid permanent economic damage?  Guest: Ben Casselman, an economics reporter at The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Jerome H. Powell, the Federal Reserve chair, has urged Congress to spend more on economic relief — even if doing so means increasing the federal deficit. He warned that the United States was experiencing an economic hit “without modern precedent.”
Our worlds have contracted; once expansive, our orbits are now measured by rooms and street blocks. But there are still ways to travel. Today, escape to the worlds contained in three letters — one about the summer of 1910, another describing an upended misconception and a third about how superstitions can offer release. We hope they can offer you some meaning — or at least a distraction.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
Note: This episode contains strong language. Today, we’re sharing Episode 5 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose. In this episode, our reporter investigates how a Swedish gamer with a webcam grew to become the biggest YouTuber in the world. We follow PewDiePie’s path to megastardom — and the war that unfolds when his reign is threatened. If you're tuning in to “Rabbit Hole” for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole.
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Comments (3778)

Miriam DeWitt

Yes! I am listening! I stand with any people of the world who are so oppressed. Every American should be thanking these protesters for fighting, for all us, against our brutal and deadly "justice" system! They should also be honored as Frontline fighters for risking infection to fight for our rights.✊

Jun 5th
Reply

Jennie Breuninger

I'm a 57 year old white woman...I'm listening.

Jun 5th
Reply

James Jone

I hope white Americans are listening

Jun 5th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

you are asking so many of the right questions?! good job and thank you for your work. the daily has near-perfect pitch lately.

Jun 5th
Reply (2)

John Taggert

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Jun 5th
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Truls Nordin

Do they know how mush they are hurting society with these lies?

Jun 4th
Reply

Joseph Campbell

This is the best thing the president has done.

Jun 4th
Reply (2)

Jonathan Petherbridge

This man eloquently sets off my bullshit detector. There is widespread republican support to abolish public sector unions. I fail to see how years of democrats couldn't have removed the Police Union if they wanted to.

Jun 4th
Reply

Junk Mail

This is a very heart wrenching episode. My heart sank further and further as the episode went on. it was upsetting to listen to but I really needed to listen to it. Thank You.

Jun 3rd
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Alex Mercedes

wow! excellent episode. I unsubscribed from The Daily months ago and only accidentally heard this. great job highlighting the nuances of a situation that's being described by many news sources in a cliched, one-dimensional way. what you've captured here is the complex and much more frightening truth about this week's crisis. time to subscribe again.

Jun 3rd
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Haley Kadlec

why are people so fixated on her voice? there's nothing wrong with this audio and then reporting is great.

Jun 2nd
Reply

Thais Tessler

Agree, painful to hear, hard to paid attention. Please, go to speech therapy!

Jun 2nd
Reply

Bob the Conqueror of Mornings

Vocal fry.... painful audio. Great subject, awful to listen to

Jun 2nd
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Peter Haines

can't wait to hear about how this is trump's fault.

Jun 2nd
Reply (4)

Walrus Bane

Wow

Jun 2nd
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N Me

who cares where people are coming from? it's horrible to watch a city burn, lines of para military police firing tear gas, rubber bullets etc. at our citizens..but ya know whats worse ? watching cops murder without any fear of consequence..let it burn 🔥

Jun 1st
Reply (28)

Chase Pipes

how can I find the video of the two protesters from Different generations debating ? please help

Jun 1st
Reply (2)

George Melbourne

so what does pizza mean to you?

Jun 1st
Reply

Dan Lohaus

m..okmml LMN ..l vvvc g y g g;

May 30th
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William H Bailey

Everything with Trump-related has all the same theme. I really think Main news media and podcast like this are really destroying the United States. Your day will come even if not for the whole body of your networks but to each of you individually. Maybe not to you but your love ones will be unfortunate. Just a fucking disgrace episode.

May 30th
Reply
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