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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

954 Episodes
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What Went Wrong in Brazil

What Went Wrong in Brazil

2020-07-0229:1635

Brazil has a long, distinguished history of successfully navigating public health crises. But in recent weeks, it has emerged as one of the world’s most severe coronavirus hot spots, second only to the United States. What went wrong? Guest: Ernesto Londoño, The Times’s Brazil bureau chiefFor more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Here’s an overview of what you need to know about the coronavirus in Brazil.The country’s pioneering responses to past health crises, including AIDS and Zika, won global praise.
A New York Times investigation has revealed evidence of a secret Russian operation to kill U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan — and of the failure of the Trump administration to act on that intelligence. As lawmakers from both parties react with fury, one of the journalists who first reported the story tells us what has come to light so far.Guest: Eric Schmitt, who covers terrorism and national security for The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: The Times reported on Monday that President Trump was provided a written briefing on the intelligence about the suspected Russian plot in late February.“If it does come out as true, obviously the heartache would be terrible,” said the father of a Marine who died in a 2019 car bombing in Afghanistan, which is reportedly the focus of investigators’ work.
The Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Louisiana law that could have left the state with a single abortion clinic. It was a setback for conservatives in the first major ruling on abortion since two Trump appointees joined the bench. We examine the implications for future challenges, and why — for the third time in two weeks — Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. sided with his four more liberal colleagues.Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Chief Justice Roberts also voted with the court’s liberal wing in rulings on job discrimination against L.G.B.T.Q. workers and on a program protecting young immigrants.The ruling on Monday stalled anti-abortion momentum for now, but the movement has a long pipeline of new cases.Justice Stephen G. Breyer wrote that the Louisiana law was “almost word-for-word identical” to a law from Texas, which the court struck down in 2016.
In the weeks since George Floyd was killed by the Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, Americans have been confronting hard questions about bias and racism within law enforcement — and what the role of the police should be.In the process, many have asked whether the culture of policing can be changed or if the system needs to be reimagined entirely. Today, we talk to an officer at the center of that debate inside one of the country’s largest police unions.Guest: Vince Champion, the southeast regional director of the International Brotherhood of Police Officers. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Protesters across the country are calling for the abolition of police forces. But what would that actually look like?Last week, the House passed a sweeping police overhaul bill, aimed at combating racial bias and excessive use of force, by a vote of 236 to 181. The bill is not expected to pass the Republican-controlled Senate.
In this episode of The Sunday Read, we look at the complexity, diversity and humanity of America through the eyes of Robert Frank — one of the most influential photographers in history — who, through his camera, collected the world.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
Gregg Breinberg has been directing the chorus at Public School 22 on Staten Island for twenty years. He tells his fourth and fifth grade students that participation is not about whether they can sing on key or not. It’s about expressing the meaning of a song — and the music inside themselves. Today, we listen to the voices of P.S. 22 as they harmonize from afar.
A Dilemma in Texas

A Dilemma in Texas

2020-06-2629:3153

Texas has become the latest hot spot in the coronavirus pandemic, forcing its governor to pause the state’s reopening process after a surge of infections and hospitalizations. We speak with our Houston correspondent about the state’s dilemma. Guest: Manny Fernandez, The New York Times’s bureau chief in Houston. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: A growing number of state leaders are pausing plans to reopen as case counts rise. Among them is Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas, who did so reluctantly after facing mounting pressure in the Republican-controlled state.We analyzed travel patterns, hidden infections and genetic data to show how the epidemic has spun out of control in the United States.
This fall’s presidential race is likely to be decided by a handful of battleground states won by President Trump in 2016. So how do voters in those states view the candidates? Guest: Nate Cohn, who covers elections, polling and demographics for The Upshot at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: A New York Times/Siena College poll found that Joseph R. Biden Jr. is ahead of the president by 14 points, leading among women and nonwhite voters and cutting into his support with white voters.
Three months after mass layoffs began across America, 20 million Americans remain out of work because of the pandemic. Federal employment benefits are about to run out, and Congress can’t agree on more financial help. We called people struggling with unemployment to hear how they are doing. Guest: Julie Creswell, Sabrina Tavernise and Ben Casselman, reporters at The New York Times, spoke with Nicolle Nordman, Analía Rodríguez and Nakitta Long about being laid off. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Some people have started to return to work, but the recovery is uneven. More than a million new jobless claims continue to be filed each week, and certain industries are far outpacing others in the rebound from the mass job losses in April.The unemployment rate isn’t the whole story when it comes to understanding the economic impact of the pandemic.
This episode contains strong language. Today’s Senate primary in Kentucky has been transformed by the outcry over police brutality. What can the election tell us about the future of Democratic politics? Guest: Jonathan Martin, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Amy McGrath was considered a safe bet in the Democratic primary in Kentucky. But the recent movement for racial justice has elevated the candidacy of her African-American rival, Charles Booker, in the race to defeat Mitch McConnell.
Companies like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have come out in support of Black Lives Matter and its mission. But are their platforms undermining the movement for racial justice? Guest: Kevin Roose, who covers technology, business and culture for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Kevin Roose explains why shows of support for Black Lives Matter from Facebook, Twitter and YouTube don’t address the way racists and partisan provocateurs have weaponized the platforms.
In today’s episode of The Sunday Read, Carvell Wallace considers why, for his kids, a global pandemic that shut down the world was not news — it was the opposite of news. It was a struggle that had, in some ways, always been a part of their lives.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
After 155 years, Juneteenth, a celebration of the emancipation of enslaved Americans, is being acknowledged as a holiday by corporations and state governments across the country. Today, we consider why, throughout its history, Juneteenth has gained prominence at moments of pain in the struggle for black liberation in America. We also ask: What does freedom mean now?Guest: Dr. Daina Ramey Berry, a professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: In a project examining the history and import of Juneteenth, we ask: What is freedom in America?Opal Lee, 93, an activist and lifelong Texan, has campaigned to make June 19 a national holiday for years. This is her vision for honoring the emancipation of enslaved Americans.
In a 5-to-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that President Trump may not shut down Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, the program that shields immigrants brought to the United States as children from deportation. But is this the end of challenges to DACA?“The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories.Host: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.Background reading:This is the reasoning Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. gave for reversing the Trump administration decision.For thousands of “Dreamers,” as DACA recipients are known, following the ups and downs of the program’s fate has been a wild ride. Here’s why it’s not over yet.
Joseph R. Biden Jr. is looking for a potential vice president in one of the most tumultuous moments in modern American history. His selection committee is attempting to winnow an exceptionally diverse field. So who’s on the list? Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: This is where the top candidates stand in Mr. Biden’s search for a running mate.
This episode contains strong language.Rayshard Brooks fell asleep in his car at a Wendy’s drive-through. Soon afterward, he was shot. We look closely at what happened in the minutes in between — and at the unrest his killing has sparked in Georgia.Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Here is our visual investigation into how Rayshard Brooks was shot and killed by the Atlanta police.The resignation of Atlanta’s police chief, Erika Shields, was the latest in a series of shake-ups at several large police departments.
The Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay and transgender workers from workplace discrimination. We examine the three words the case hung on; what the written opinions had to say about bathrooms, locker rooms, sports, pronouns and religious objections to same-sex marriage; and the implications for the ruling. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times and Aimee Stephens, the lead plaintiff in a transgender discrimination case heard by the Supreme Court. Ms. Stephens died in May; she was 59. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Ms. Stephens was fired after she announced that she would live as a woman. She did not live to see the Supreme Court rule in her favor.Until Monday’s decision, it was legal in more than half of the states to fire workers for being gay, bisexual or transgender.The justices are confronting an unusually potent mix of political and social issues in the middle of both a presidential election year and a public health crisis. Here’s an overview of the major cases this year to get you up to speed.
States are reopening. Parks are crowded. Restaurants are filling, again, with diners. But is this dangerous? Six months into the pandemic, we reflect on what we’ve learned about the virus — and ask how that knowledge should chart the course forward. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: As New York businesses reopened, Gov. Andrew Cuomo warned that a second wave of infections was almost inevitable if residents did not abide by social-distancing rules. “It will come,” he said. “And once it comes, it’s too late.” Restrictions are easing across the United States, but Arizona, Florida and Texas are reporting their highest case numbers yet. As of Saturday, coronavirus cases were climbing in 22 states.
The Sunday Read: 'Getting Out'

The Sunday Read: 'Getting Out'

2020-06-1401:05:1442

In this episode of The Sunday Read, one man reflects on what it was like to go to prison as a child and to attempt to become an attorney upon his release. In doing so, he asks: What is punishment in America? What is it for? And how should we think about it?This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
The Times critic Wesley Morris had listened to Patti LaBelle’s live rendition of “If You Don’t Know Me by Now” over a hundred times before. But one recent Sunday, the song came on and he heard something new. “I heard her thinking through an ultimatum now being laid down in the streets of this country,” he went on to write. Soon after, he got a call from one Ms. Patti LaBelle.
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Comments (3983)

Rodrigo Pacheco

Good Evening, Sir I don't get your point, do you really believe China revealed their accurate number of deaths of covid-19 ? Really ? Is that a joke ? and World Health Organization is totally corrupted even my niece who is five yeard old known that. And I give you a advice take a look on this website https://www.ipea.gov.br/atlasviolencia/, and see how many people died murdered in Brazil and the press gave a littel bit of attention and now they find out the deaths ? Come on give a break, the press are for sure and doubt biased, and please if you want to talk about our Country first step, move here, live our life our daily bases, and then speak for yourself.Bye.

Jul 5th
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Corey Goodall

The "everyone calls 911 for any issue & we can't send someone besides cops" is bullshit. If a robbery is in progress, 911 doesn't route that to fire or ambulance. They seem to be able to figure out who the appropriate party is depending on the situation. Why wouldn't they be able to route to social worker or a psych call? 1 good, well-trained employee is far more valuable and effective than 5 shitty employees. Don't hire more cops, train the best ones more effectively and get rid of the bullies with badges.

Jul 3rd
Reply (2)

Haavard

hey who was paying ISIS, it was the US ofc - you will never hear a peep about it - a "fake" war why are they gone now ? Trump stopped paying them

Jul 1st
Reply (11)

Wendy Bruder

Well those guys were a huge predictable disappointment.

Jun 30th
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Kiturah Doward

nice story but the reading feels rushed and run on...

Jun 30th
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Irina Solokhin

пх7л* .й1л о 03 ты ф1эм

Jun 30th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

bravo!! courageous coverage of a timely, difficult topic. the guy representing police is a textbook example of the obstinacy within Police World to deny reality. the union rep doesn't really get it either but he shows slightly more potential to learn. So... I commend the host's patience and sensitivity; and also thank him for stepping up as a white person.

Jun 30th
Reply (5)

cookie monster

I wonder if we as a society funded preventative health care, mental health, drug treatment, family counseling, and had more financial equality, we would have less emergency situations requiring a police response.

Jun 30th
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Tyler Foss

Michael was trying as hard as he could to make it a race issue and was frankly made to sound like a bias idiot.

Jun 30th
Reply (5)

Vlad S

Smart and wise union rep. Amazing how the interviewer wants to twist things

Jun 30th
Reply (6)

Jonathan Petherbridge

in Australia we have a psychologist and a cop who make up a "psyc unit". You can't send a psychologist to someone who is having an episode, who they have no relationship with, without cop. a psychologist is paid a lot more than a cop. Our top tax rate is 48%.

Jun 30th
Reply (1)

Top Clean

R.I.P Goodbye Texas. You now invented the instant Death row express lane for all your citizens, even for the not guilty. https://www.propublica.org/article/state-coronavirus-data-doesnt-support-trumps-misleading-testing-claims/amp?__twitter_impression=true " Thank you Abbot and Trump for your tremendous job you really done." 🖓👎 https://eu.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/detroit-city/2020/05/06/duggan-discuss-efforts-verify-accuracy-rapid-testing-detroit/5175168002/

Jun 29th
Reply (1)

Galina Vladi

An outstanding interview with the police union director! I am glad it made him uncomfortable. He has a lot to think about now.

Jun 29th
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Anna Tramposch

talk about cognitive dissonance.....

Jun 29th
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Michael Blair

The last person in this particular episode has an unbelievable story. Forgive my candor in advance but it appears she was naive or simply did not want to use her advance degree in Criminal Justice. Her opportunities are endless with the federal government. She could be a civilian analyst for an array of federal law enforcement agencies making well over 100K in time. To have such a compelling degree and not crack ever $50,000 is striking and leads me to think she was comfortable in manufacturing as oppose to finding a better opportunity. I commiserate with her woes but I wish she used her degree better than manufacturing.

Jun 29th
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Darin Sharick

thanks for introducing me to this amazing team! What they inspire their kids to do is heartening!

Jun 28th
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Galina Vladi

Excellent Sunday Read piece! I enjoyed it immensely. Thank you!

Jun 28th
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markesssssss

Cool, now do one in the voters biden is losing

Jun 28th
Reply (1)

Megan Punches

It’s nice to hear from all women but maybe get a diverse selection of ages. Can we talk about how much this unemployment pandemic is affecting millennials who are suffering under the weight of student loans and who have significantly less assets? This is setting us back even further from financial freedom.

Jun 26th
Reply

Josh Chandler

We were also confused about the Local Govt releasing prisoners from jail, but more than willing to toss business owners into jail. That makes no sense to us down here to San Antonio.

Jun 26th
Reply
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