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The Daily

The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

989 Episodes
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“As a Black woman who works at Adidas my experiences have never been business as usual.”Julia Bond, an assistant apparel designer at the sportswear giant, says she had resigned herself to experiencing and witnessing racism at work — until she saw the George Floyd video.Today, we speak to Ms. Bond, an assistant apparel designer at Adidas, who has brought the global racial reckoning to the company’s front door.Wanting more than just schemes and targets, she has been protesting in front of the company’s Portland headquarters every day since June, awaiting an apology from leadership and an admission that they have enabled racism and discrimination. Guest: Julia Bond, assistant apparel designer at Adidas, who has been protesting outside the company’s Portland headquarters for the last three months. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Adidas has made a number of pledges to diversify its work force. However, Black employees want more: an admission that the company’s leadership has enabled racism and an apology.  From Facebook’s pledge to double the number of Black and Latinx by 2023 to YouTube creating a $100 million fund for Black creators, organizations across the U.S. have committed to redressing racial imbalance. 
With the possibility that millions or tens of millions of American children will not enter a classroom for an entire year, school districts face an agonizing choice: Do the benefits of in-person learning outweigh the risks it poses to public health in a pandemic? Today, we explore how teachers and their unions are responding to demands from some parents, and the president, to reopen their schools this fall. Guest: Dana Goldstein, a national correspondent for The New York Times, who covers the impact of education policies on families, students and teachers. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: With almost 1,200 staff and students now quarantined, the reopening of Atlanta’s Cherokee County School District could presage a difficult back-to-school season.Many teachers are anxious and angry: They say crucial questions about how schools will stay clean, keep students physically distanced and prevent further spread of the virus have not been answered.Our illustrator imagined what going back to school might look like this fall.
A Historic V.P. Decision

A Historic V.P. Decision

2020-08-1230:0929

Joseph R. Biden Jr. picked Senator Kamala Harris of California as his running mate, making her the first Black woman and the first Asian American woman to run for vice president on a major party ticket. Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times, shares his thoughts on the decision. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Joe Biden selected Kamala Harris as his vice-presidential running mate on Tuesday. She will be the first is the first Black woman and the first person of Indian descent to be nominated for the office by a major party.The selection of Ms. Harris was conventional by some political standards, and groundbreaking in others. Democrats hope that having her on the ticket will attract moderates and Black voters in swing states.Here’s what you should know about the California senator and her stances on key policy issues. 
Yesterday on “The Daily,” the New York Times reporter Jonah Bromwich explained how the idea of cancel culture has emerged as a political and cultural force in 2020. In the second of two parts, he returns with a case study. Guest: Jonah Engel Bromwich, who writes for the Styles section of The New York Times, spoke with Zeeshan Aleem about his experience of cancel culture. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Here’s the first episode in this two-part series exploring cancel culture’s origins and political power.There’s an emerging class of people canceled for bad, conservative or offensive opinions. Cancellation is bringing many of them together.For teenagers, cancellation on social media is not a new phenomenon. Here are some of their own experiences with being canceled.
In the first of two parts, the New York Times reporter Jonah Bromwich explains the origins of cancel culture and why it’s a 2020 election story worth paying attention to. Guest: Jonah Engel Bromwich, who writes for the Styles section of The New York TimesFor more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: What does it mean to be canceled? It can take only one thing — and sometimes, nothing — for fans to dump a celebrity.Many figures in the public eye — including Kanye West and J.K. Rowling — have fretted about being, or claimed to have been, canceled. When an open letter published by Harper’s and signed by 153 prominent artists warned against an “intolerant climate” engulfing the culture, the reaction was swift.The prevalence of “call-out culture” is something former President Barack Obama has challenged. 
John Aldridge fell overboard in the middle of the night, 40 miles from shore, and the Coast Guard was looking in the wrong place. This is a story about isolation — and our struggle to close the space between us.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.This is the article read in this episode, written by Paul Tough.
It’s been four years since the 2016 election laid bare the powerful role that social media companies have come to play in shaping political discourse and beliefs in America.Since then, there have been growing calls to address the spread of polarization and misinformation promoted on such platforms.While Facebook has been slower to acknowledge a need for change, Twitter has embraced the challenge, acknowledging that the company made mistakes in the past. But with three months to go until the 2020 election, these changes have been incremental, and Twitter itself is more popular than ever.Today, Jack Dorsey, Twitter’s C.E.O., discusses the platform’s flaws, its polarizing potential — and his vision for the future.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: A 17-year-old in Florida was recently responsible for one of the worst hacking attacks in Twitter’s history — successfully breaching the accounts of some of the world’s most famous people, including Barack Obama, Kanye West and Elon Musk. But did the teenager do the country a favor?Twitter is in hot water with the government for sharing with advertisers phone numbers given to the company for personal security purposes
The Day That Shook Beirut

The Day That Shook Beirut

2020-08-0623:4934

A mangled yellow door. Shattered glass. Blood.A devastating explosion of ammonium nitrate stored at the port in Beirut killed at least 135 people and razed entire neighborhoods on Tuesday. This is what our correspondent in the Lebanese capital saw when the blast turned her apartment “into a demolition site” — and what happened in the hours after.Guest: Vivian Yee, our correspondent based in Beirut. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: As the shock of the blast turns to anger in Lebanon, this is what we know so far about the explosion.In a land conditioned by calamity, Vivian wrote about what it felt like to emerge from the debris into the kindness of strangers and friends.
‘Stay Black and Die’

‘Stay Black and Die’

2020-08-0543:4826

Demonstrations against police brutality are entering their third month, but meaningful policy action has not happened. We speak with one demonstrator about her journey to the front lines of recent protests — and the lessons she’s learned about the pace of change.Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter at The New York Times, spoke with Sharhonda Bossier, deputy director at Education Leaders of Color, an advocacy group.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: While protests in most American cities have tapered off, the confrontation between protesters and federal agents in downtown Portland, Ore., continues.Here is our latest reporting on the protests against racism and police violence that spread around the world after the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May.
The United States is preparing to hold its first ever socially distant presidential election. But will it actually work?Guest: Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: President Trump’s suggestion that the Nov. 3 vote could be delayed — something he cannot do on his own — drew unusually firm Republican resistance and signaled worry about his re-election bid.Georgia’s troubled primary elections in June may be a preview of graver battles coming in the general election.
Facial recognition is becoming an increasingly central component of police departments’ efforts to solve crimes. But can algorithms harbor racial bias?Guest: Annie Brown, a producer for The New York Times, speaks with Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter, about her interview with Robert Julian-Borchak Williams, who was arrested after being misidentified as a criminal by an algorithm. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: In response to Mr. Williams’s story being published by The New York Times, the Wayne County prosecutor’s office said that he could have the case and his fingerprint data expunged.
In this episode, Leslie Jamison, a writer and teacher, explores the potentially constructive force of female anger — and the shame that can get attached to it.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
The remains of Vanessa Guillen, an Army specialist, were discovered last month about 25 miles from Fort Hood in central Texas. She was the victim, officials said, of a fellow soldier. Now her death has attracted the attention of the nation — veterans, active-duty service members and civilians.Today, we examine what some claim to be a pervasive culture of sexual harassment inside the U.S. military. Guest: Jennifer Steinhauer, a Washington reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Women from the military say the response to Specialist Guillen’s killing is their #MeToo moment and a prompt to examine racial inequities in the service.
The Big Tech Hearing

The Big Tech Hearing

2020-07-3034:3132

The C.E.O.s of America’s most influential technology companies — Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook — were brought before Congress to answer a question: Are they too powerful?Today, we talk to our colleague who was in the room about what happened. Guest: Cecilia Kang, a technology and regulatory policy reporter for The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: In the hearing, the chiefs of Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook faced withering questions from Democrats about anti-competitive practices and from Republicans about anti-conservative bias.
Confronting China

Confronting China

2020-07-2928:3943

A cooperative relationship with China has been a pillar of U.S. foreign policy for more than half a century. So why does the Trump administration think it’s time for a change? Guest: Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Why top aides to President Trump want to leave a lasting legacy of ruptured diplomatic ties between China and the United States.
A fight has erupted among congressional Republicans over how long and how generously the government should help those unemployed during the pandemic. But what is that battle really about? Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Supplemental checks for laid-off workers are set to stop at the end of July. Republicans and Democrats disagree on what to do next.Why the two parties are unlikely to reach a deal before the end of the month.
A New York Times investigation found that surviving the coronavirus in New York had a lot to do with which hospital a person went to. Our investigative reporter Brian M. Rosenthal pulls back the curtain on inequality and the pandemic in the city.Guest: Brian M. Rosenthal, an investigative reporter on the Metro Desk of The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: At the peak of New York’s pandemic, patients at some community hospitals were three times more likely to die than were patients at medical centers in the wealthiest parts of the city.The story of a $52 million temporary care facility in New York illustrates the missteps made at every level of government in the race to create more hospital capacity.
When the university told one woman about the sexual-harassment complaints against her wife, they knew they weren’t true. But they had no idea how strange the truth really was.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
This episode contains strong language.Today, we go inside the fraught weeks that led up to the opening game of the 2020 professional baseball season — from the perspective of the commissioner of Major League Baseball. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security for The New York Times, spoke with Rob Manfred, the commissioner of Major League Baseball. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: The schedule is short. The stadiums will be empty. This is what our baseball writer thinks the season might look like this year.
The Showdown in Portland

The Showdown in Portland

2020-07-2330:1447

This episode contains strong language. Federal agents dressed in camouflage and tactical gear have taken to the streets of Portland, Ore., unleashing tear gas, bloodying protesters and pulling some people into unmarked vans. Today, we go behind protest lines to ask why militarized federal authorities are being deployed to an American city. Guests: Zolan Kanno-Youngs, The New York Times’s homeland security correspondent, and Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent for The Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: The federal authorities said they would bring order to Portland, after weeks of protests. But local leaders believe the federal presence is making things worse, and a backlash has grown since the deployment began.Protesters have used everyday home items, including pool noodles, to try to fight the militarized force. This is what our reporter saw on the streets of Portland.
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Comments (4153)

The Rabbit Hole

I personally see her as hypersensitive to racism but at the end of the day, she even confirmed this, all this could have been avoided if they acknowledged the issue was real and apologized. insensitive jokes and a rebel flag are are pretty easy to talk over

Aug 14th
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Rasheed Wllc

Why are black ppl so hyper sensible? You think its only you who are suffering? That woman should stop crying! If you dont like adidas than go and work somewhere else! We, Getman Taxpayers, did not save Adidas to spend the taxpayers money for such non sense!

Aug 14th
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John Smith

honestly all I heard was a story of the most hypersensitive entitled girl in history who milked Adidas for 150 million dollars then expected to be paid not to work... this isnt a problem of racism it's a problem of entitlement

Aug 14th
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lzk222

This moderate Republican ticket alienates progressives. I hope it comes back to haunt them. I for one will not be voting for these neoliberal corporatists.

Aug 14th
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Gabriella Arroyo

interesting that you bring up cancel culture in 2 episodes and never bring up Bari Weiss.... if you want to do a case study on cancel culture affecting employment there are a slew of examples in your own office...

Aug 13th
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Amirpasha Mozaffari

Thanks a lot for your super informing and concise show! Keep up the good work!

Aug 13th
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Porsha Gilbert

Being canceled because you're racist is different than a racist attacking you online. It's not two sides of the same coin, or something.

Aug 13th
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Porsha Gilbert

#cancelculture is a way for people without power, to impact the powerful, whereas they were unable to do so before. Racism isnt nuanced. She said "black man" specifically because she knew it would have more of an impact, she knew there would be a response to this "dangerous" black man- this terrible individual. She said it over and over. I hope she enjoys unemployment.

Aug 13th
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Chuckie G.

the podcast sounds clear to me

Aug 13th
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Mark Sudak

Incredible story! The Coastguard doesn't get enough credit or publicity for what they do every single day. It's always great to hear a successful Coast Guard rescue story!

Aug 13th
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hunterxninja

is someone typing at the broadcast? the constant noise is quite bothering.

Aug 12th
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Jonathan Petherbridge

There's a difference between a post on Twitter because you disagree with someone and trying to get someone fired from their job because you disagree with someone. I thought people liked former and not the latter. These two didn't appear to make the distinction.

Aug 12th
Reply (1)

Marian Merritt

Excellent story, well told. Brought me to tears. Throughout the story I wanted to google the results but was held fast to listening to the story. Love The Daily!

Aug 10th
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Tomik Dash

Brought me to tears.

Aug 10th
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Abdullah ÖZDEMİR

good

Aug 9th
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Paz Ibarra

I miss this place. Used to have bunch here and loved their Bloody Mary menu.

Aug 9th
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Jonathan Petherbridge

A rare good podcast. Well done NYT, missed all of your usual pitfalls and nailed it!

Aug 9th
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Alex Mercedes

Arrgh! 30 minutes and I can't take anymore of Barbaro. he seems unfamiliar with the idea that any tool can be used for good or for ill....what?

Aug 8th
Reply (1)

Alex Mercedes

I really hate when Barbaro gets locked into an adversarial posture with a guest. He misses important new information revealed by the interviewee because he is so intent on his pre-planned agenda, doggedly pursuing some kind of abject mea culpa when that's such old news. despite this, hearing Jack Dorsey in his own words was eye-opening for me. he seems like a decent human being, a surprise after listening to what many pundits say about him.

Aug 8th
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Top Clean

Politicians and diapers should be changed frequently and all for the same reason. ... When you are poor, they call it welfare. When you are rich, they call it saving the economy. It's socialism for the rich, and harsh capitalism for everyone else. A man's fate should not be decided on any single event, but on the sum of his contributions. ... Positive thinking will let you do everything better, than negative thinking will. "Stop trumping around, you aren't getting anything done!" You are what you do, not what you say you’ll do. Trump has two parts of brain, 'left' and 'right'. In the left side, there's nothing right. In the right side, there's nothing left. ... https://www.factcheck.org/2020/06/trumps-absentee-vs-mail-in-ballot-spin/ https://www.getyourballot.org/ #Vote.org

Aug 7th
Reply
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