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Linear thinking is valuable when the environment is relatively stable and familiar. But in uncertain economic times, executives also need to think expansively about the future, analyzing a range of potential scenarios. Alan Iny discusses how executives can prepare for uncertainty rather than be overwhelmed by it. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
COP27, the global climate conference in Egypt, represented a mix of accomplishments and frustrations. Wealthy nations agreed to establish a fund to help pay for the loss and damage that their emissions have imposed on poor countries in Africa and elsewhere.And yet the current levels of emissions from the North remain stubbornly high, and will continue to affect nations in the South. Several members of BCG’s COP27 delegation discuss what the conference means for Africa—the need for resilient infrastructure and communities, the need for the private sector to do more, and the dangers that both climate change and climate action impose on women.Mentioned in this episode:BCG Present: Climate Vision 2050It’s 2050 and we’re exploring how the world radically reduced carbon emissions and saved itself from climate catastrophe. What have our cities done to accommodate massive population growth? And how do businesses, governments, researchers and everyday people work together to build sustainable supply chains, agricultural practices and transportation infrastructure?Climate Vision TrailerThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
We often hear that the climate transition must also be a just transition. But how can we make that happen when, for example, coal remains both the largest source of energy in the world and a source of steady income for miners in many countries? Keshlan Mudaly, a BCG principal in Johannesburg, South Africa, unpacks the many tradeoffs and dilemmas that confront public and private leaders in their quest to lower carbon emissions. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
It’s 2050 and we’re exploring how the world radically reduced carbon emissions and saved itself from climate catastrophe. What have our cities done to accommodate massive population growth? And how do businesses, governments, researchers and everyday people work together to build sustainable supply chains, agricultural practices and transportation infrastructure?This is Climate Vision 2050, a new podcast series from BCG.In an exclusive peek at episode 1, energy islands around the world power our societies in 2050, each with hundreds of offshore wind turbines. In this episode, we travel alongside offshore technician Sofia Rojas to the North Sea energy island; one of the oldest. Sofia must investigate and fix an anomaly detected through the island's AI interface known as SAILOR.Full series launching 2023. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
How well will the world adapt to ever more extreme climate events? To date most government and business leaders are focusing on climate mitigation at the expense of climate adaptation. Charmian Caines, a senior partner at BCG, argues that they must do both. They should build scenarios assessing the economic, social, and natural damage of rising temperatures and develop financial and operational plans to combat rising sea levels, raging fires, and other extreme weather events. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
Corporate values are more important than ever. Should companies boycott countries with values they do not share? Kushal Khandhar, global Pride@BCG manager, argues it often makes sense for companies with LGBTQ+–friendly policies to continue to work in queer-unfriendly countries. Companies can be “embassies of values,” says Khandar who has worked in conservative countries whose governments outlaw his sexuality.This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
Inflation is higher than it’s been in a generation, but policy makers still have room to maneuver. Philipp Carlsson-Szlezak, BCG’s global chief economist, is concerned about inflation but not yet willing to say the world is in a new era of constantly spiraling prices and collapsing asset prices. Central banks and policy makers still have the tools to control potential contagion. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
Are companies looking for talent in all the wrong places? Only 10% of jobs are filled by internal lateral candidates. Companies need better ways to find internal candidates especially those who work in a different part of the organization or have latent skills, explain BCG's Nithya Vaduganathan and Gloat's Brian Hershey. Internal talent marketplaces, which are sort of dating apps matching employees to jobs, are one promising option for companies to pursue. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
Are traditional companies, long derided for being sluggish and stuck in the past, about to undergo a renaissance? Patrick Forth, of BCG’s Technology, Media & Telecommunications practice, talks about the exciting future for incumbents that succeed at digital transformation. Unfortunately, only one-third of digital transformations are successful. What separates the winners from the losers? After years of studying digital transformations, Forth has identified the six factors that can elevate the chance of success to more than 80%—and only one is a technology issue. Forth talks about the importance of strategy, leadership, talent, governance, and measurement—and why middle managers are the unsung heroes of digital transformation.This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
The future of the tech industry depends on women. So how do you grow that tech career, and why is imposter syndrome sometimes a good thing? In this episode, hear from our new podcast series In Her Ellement, where AI expert Andrea Gallego and product designer Corin Lines from Boston Consulting Group have honest conversations with women at the vanguard of technology in business, art, education, and more.They're speaking with Alaina Percival, CEO of Women Who Code—the largest and most active community for technical women in the world. Her advice is to continually challenge yourself and elevate your voice and goals—remember that you’re in high demand!Alaina shares her career path; she’s run niche products for Puma in Germany, led developer outreach for a technical recruiting company in San Francisco, and taught herself to code. As the CEO of Women Who Code, she works to inspire women to thrive in the tech industry. Alaina shares how she navigates the always near and dear imposter syndrome; that if you aren’t feeling it—you may have been in your role too long. There should always be 40% that you don’t know. She also emphasizes the importance of community and support; don’t be shy to reach out and share your goals—there is a very accessible and supportive community willing to help.Follow In Her Ellement for more meaningful conversations with women in digital, technology, and business.Visit Women Who Code to access free resources and workshops, browse job & scholarship opportunities, and engage with an amazing network of technical women across the globe.This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
Johann Harnoss doesn’t just advise companies on innovation and global talent mobility. He also has cofounded a nonprofit organization to help students from nations such as Syria and Afghanistan secure jobs in Europe. In other words, Harnoss has seen global talent from both sides. He debunks notions that immigration is harmful to host nations or that it leads to a brain drain from countries of origin. He’s not optimistic, however, about the state of immigration in the US.Mentioned in this episode:BCG Present: Climate Vision 2050It’s 2050 and we’re exploring how the world radically reduced carbon emissions and saved itself from climate catastrophe. What have our cities done to accommodate massive population growth? And how do businesses, governments, researchers and everyday people work together to build sustainable supply chains, agricultural practices and transportation infrastructure?Climate Vision TrailerThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
In an interconnected world, global health is not just a scientific aspiration but an economic one. As supply shortages brought on by factory shutdowns in China demonstrate, a disease outbreak in one part of the world has ramifications on the other side of the globe. Johanna Benesty, who leads BCG’s global health work, talks about the opportunities for pharmaceutical and other health care companies in serving underserved populations in lower- and middle-income countries and elsewhere. Price is not the only barrier. Treatments may need to be redesigned to meet the realities of these countries rather than the wealthy countries where they were developed.Mentioned in this episode:BCG Present: Climate Vision 2050It’s 2050 and we’re exploring how the world radically reduced carbon emissions and saved itself from climate catastrophe. What have our cities done to accommodate massive population growth? And how do businesses, governments, researchers and everyday people work together to build sustainable supply chains, agricultural practices and transportation infrastructure?Climate Vision TrailerThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
Companies will never achieve net zero unless they can measure their emissions, and few of them do it successfully. Only about one in ten companies accurately tracks its emissions. Artificial intelligence is starting to help fill in the data gaps. Charlotte Degot, BCG partner, and founder of CO2 AI by BCG, an an AI-based solution for emissions measurement and reduction, explains how better data about emissions accelerates action. She's joined by Dexter Galvin, global director of corporations and supply chains for CDP, a global nonprofit organization that runs the world’s environmental disclosure system for companies, cities, states, and regions.Mentioned in this episode:BCG Present: Climate Vision 2050It’s 2050 and we’re exploring how the world radically reduced carbon emissions and saved itself from climate catastrophe. What have our cities done to accommodate massive population growth? And how do businesses, governments, researchers and everyday people work together to build sustainable supply chains, agricultural practices and transportation infrastructure?Climate Vision TrailerThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
While the world races ahead into the metaverse, education remains rooted in the era of neat orderly rows of desks and lesson plans. In this wide-ranging conversation, Leila Hoteit, the managing director and senior partner who leads BCG’s education, employment, and welfare work, argues for a lifelong approach to learning inside and outside the classroom—one that teaches people to solve hard problems and develop soft skills. She talks about why students should think about the fairytale “Little Red Riding Hood” from the perspective of the wolf, how the technology that treats autism can help others learn better, and why people from different cultures may come up with different answers to the famous trolley problem. Mentioned in this episode:BCG Present: Climate Vision 2050It’s 2050 and we’re exploring how the world radically reduced carbon emissions and saved itself from climate catastrophe. What have our cities done to accommodate massive population growth? And how do businesses, governments, researchers and everyday people work together to build sustainable supply chains, agricultural practices and transportation infrastructure?Climate Vision TrailerThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
Over the past two years, the world has seen what happens when supply and procurement chains seize up and shortages in such staples as infant formula and sunflower oil become commonplace. Daniel Weise, leader of BCG’s global procurement business, explains how companies can move beyond a cost-cutting mentality to treat their supply chain as a strategic imperative—the way that Apple did when it promoted Tim Cook, an operations and supply chain executive, to CEO. Unfortunately, most CEOs spend only minutes a day on their supply chain and procurement issues, and these topics are far too important to be relegated to corporate Siberia, Weise is a coauthor of Profit from the Source, published by Harvard Business Review Press.Mentioned in this episode:BCG Present: Climate Vision 2050It’s 2050 and we’re exploring how the world radically reduced carbon emissions and saved itself from climate catastrophe. What have our cities done to accommodate massive population growth? And how do businesses, governments, researchers and everyday people work together to build sustainable supply chains, agricultural practices and transportation infrastructure?Climate Vision TrailerThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
A Pride@BCG leader talks about how a supportive culture unlocks creativity. For Dakota Santana-Grace, being out at work is a professional necessity as much as a personal choice. When Santana-Grace once hid his queer identity from a client, he was stressed and exhausted, and his work suffered. The weight of his secret lifted after Santana-Grace, BCG’s Northeast lead for Pride@BCG, casually mentioned his boyfriend. Santana-Grace also talks about the time a straight ally called him out for deepening his voice in meetings--and why he invited a drag queen to the Boston office.Mentioned in this episode:BCG Present: Climate Vision 2050It’s 2050 and we’re exploring how the world radically reduced carbon emissions and saved itself from climate catastrophe. What have our cities done to accommodate massive population growth? And how do businesses, governments, researchers and everyday people work together to build sustainable supply chains, agricultural practices and transportation infrastructure?Climate Vision TrailerThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
Corporate leaders often view sustainable products as a series of technical challenges—how to decarbonize the supply chain, reduce waste in manufacturing, eliminate plastic packaging, and so on. But what about the human dimensions? Shalini Unnikrishnan, a leader on social impact at BCG, discusses the importance of designing, marketing, and pricing products through the lens of the consumer. She also discussed the need to create ecosystems of like-minded companies and institutions and to connect sustainability to a company’s core purpose.Mentioned in this episode:BCG Present: Climate Vision 2050It’s 2050 and we’re exploring how the world radically reduced carbon emissions and saved itself from climate catastrophe. What have our cities done to accommodate massive population growth? And how do businesses, governments, researchers and everyday people work together to build sustainable supply chains, agricultural practices and transportation infrastructure?Climate Vision TrailerThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
Nan DasGupta played soccer in her youth and worked as an engineer at GE early in her career, so she has firsthand experience breaking into male-dominated realms. DasGupta, BCG people and organization expert and Women@BCG leader, talks about the difficulties in breaking down bias at work, how bias prevents men from assuming more caregiving responsibilities, the importance of role models, and why nobody wants to talk about menopause.Mentioned in this episode:BCG Present: Climate Vision 2050It’s 2050 and we’re exploring how the world radically reduced carbon emissions and saved itself from climate catastrophe. What have our cities done to accommodate massive population growth? And how do businesses, governments, researchers and everyday people work together to build sustainable supply chains, agricultural practices and transportation infrastructure?Climate Vision TrailerThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
Businesses that lead on climate and sustainability will have tailwinds at their back, says Rich Lesser, BCG’s global chair. Reaching net zero will require investments of $3 trillion to $5 trillion per year for the next 30 years—and it is much smarter to participate in this massive industrial transformation than to fight it. To succeed, businesses will need to engage deeply with other businesses, their customers, and governments. The challenge is too large to go it alone or to view government as an impediment. For businesses that want to do the right thing, Lesser says, “getting government policies that raise the standard for everyone is in their interest.” Lesser also talks about his own evolution in understanding the climate crisis, how purpose can drive performance, and why the job of CEO today is harder but more rewarding than it was a decade ago. Mentioned in this episode:BCG Present: Climate Vision 2050It’s 2050 and we’re exploring how the world radically reduced carbon emissions and saved itself from climate catastrophe. What have our cities done to accommodate massive population growth? And how do businesses, governments, researchers and everyday people work together to build sustainable supply chains, agricultural practices and transportation infrastructure?Climate Vision TrailerThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
Pay, promotion, and benefits have been the traditional carrots for hiring and retaining employees. But what happens when they are not enough? During the Great Resignation, companies have watched well-paid, decorated employees walk out the door. They have watched front-line workers who had just received raises walk. Why? The emotional needs of employees are as critical as their functional needs, says Gabi Novacek, a BCG Henderson Institute fellow researching diversity, equity, and inclusion. Feeling safe, challenged, and valued at work can be even more important as a paycheck. Novacek, an archeologist by training, also discusses how a family medical emergency shaped her thinking about what really matters at work.   Mentioned in this episode:BCG Present: Climate Vision 2050It’s 2050 and we’re exploring how the world radically reduced carbon emissions and saved itself from climate catastrophe. What have our cities done to accommodate massive population growth? And how do businesses, governments, researchers and everyday people work together to build sustainable supply chains, agricultural practices and transportation infrastructure?Climate Vision TrailerThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
Comments (5)

ryan screaigh

Great podcast! I just saw a teenager liking apparently random tiktok videos; but the reality might have been that he was curating his feed. How being aware of cognitive reserves and what depletes vs recharges, has implications on decision making throughout the day. Interesting to see how the field of psychology is making its way into the business space and the MBA.

Feb 9th
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Mohammad Javad Elmi

A magnificant episode, I hope that we as human beings take more care about our language.

Jan 9th
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Mohammad Javad Elmi

The last 4 minutes of this was amazing

Jan 1st
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Loh Rachel

Brilliant insights and a must-listen! I’ve started listening to The So What consistently and highly recommend. Their pieces are relevant, timely, and overflow with insightful content from experts in the field. Also, a great length for a commute / morning run.

Nov 14th
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Bhavana S

Great one! Insights coming directly from the industry leaders are huge takeaways!

Nov 8th
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