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AIM CCI is encouraging communities to come together using their Maternal Monologues Toolkit, whereby birthing people and their support systems can share their experiences related to the maternal health journey, illuminate what the national maternal health crisis looks like in their own community, and strategize about what they can do to address it. In this episode, Race for Equity's Deitre Epps is joined by Dr. Valerie Newsome Garcia to discuss how to use this toolkit and the importance of community storytelling in understanding and advocating for change in maternal health.Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.MHLIC collaborates with many organizations and people for content such as the podcasts, videos, and webinar series. The statements, information, and opinions shared may not reflect MHLIC and MHLIC partners. Our team strives to hold ourselves and invited experts accountable, and will address violations to our values and overall mission. Read our full disclaimer here.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
In 2017, Dr. Shalon Irving passed away after complications from giving birth to her daughter. A passionate trailblazer for community health, her legacy inspired the Dr. Shalon's Maternal Action Project, which works to address inequities and disparities for the Black women and women of color in maternal health. In this episode, learn more about Dr. Shalon's legacy and how MAP is on a mission to create a world in which Black women are heard, respected and cared for in their birthing processes.Participate in MAP's Giving Tuesday Campaign!Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.MHLIC collaborates with many organizations and people for content such as the podcasts, videos, and webinar series. The statements , information, and opinions shared may not reflect MHLIC and MHLIC partners. Our team strives to hold ourselves and invited experts accountable, and will address violations to our values and overall mission. Read our full disclaimer here.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
In this special episode, Maternal Health Innovation is teaming up with AMCHP's MCH Bridges podcast to bring you this episode on maternal health policy successes, challenges and opportunities while discussing Colorado's recent passing of the Birth Equity Bill Package. A series of three bills designed to increase access to decrease inequities in and overall improve obstetric care in the state, this comprehensive and community-led response to the maternal health crisis is the first ever state led policy platform for birth equity. In this episode, host Laura Powis, program manager for Evidence-Based Policy and Practice at AMCHP and member of the Policy Core at MHLIC, is joined by Indra Lusero, Birth at Justice, advocate and founder of the Elephant Circle; Demetra Seriki, midwife at A Mother's Choice Midwifery; and George Davis V, a community member on Elephant Circle's Birth Equity Implementation Steering Committee.Learn more about the Colorado Birth Equity Bill Package policy development efforts by checking out their Innovation Hub database entry here.Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.MHLIC collaborates with many organizations and people for content such as the podcasts, videos, and webinar series. The statements , information, and opinions shared may not reflect MHLIC and MHLIC partners. Our team strives to hold ourselves and invited experts accountable, and will address violations to our values and overall mission. Read our full disclaimer here.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
Language matters. Body language matters. Accessibility matters. Inclusivity and equity should be at the heart of all maternal healthcare touchpoints. In this episode, Fernanda Ochoa Toro, research coordinator at UNC Chapel Hill and a patient navigator for Spanish speaking patients at UNC Health sits down with Dr. Kristin Tully, research assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and part of the UNC Collaborative for Maternal and Infant Health team to discuss Latina maternal health.Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.MHLIC collaborates with many organizations and people for content such as the podcasts, videos, and webinar series. The statements , information, and opinions shared may not reflect MHLIC and MHLIC partners. Our team strives to hold ourselves and invited experts accountable, and will address violations to our values and overall mission. Read our full disclaimer here.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
While several states are in the process of implementing Medicaid coverage for doula services, only a handful of states are actively providing that coverage. In this episode, host Deitre Epps, founder and CEO of Race for Equity, is joined by Averjill Rookwood, founder of The Corporate Doula, and Amy Chen, senior attorney at the National Health Law Program, to discuss the importance of accessible doula coverage and the National Health Law Program’s Doula Medicaid Project.The information in this podcast about states currently implementing Medicaid coverage for doula care is accurate as of September 2022 when the podcast was recorded. For the most current updates, please see the Doula Medicaid Project webpage at https://healthlaw.org/doulamedicaidproject/Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.MHLIC collaborates with many organizations and people for content such as the podcasts, videos, and webinar series. The statements , information, and opinions shared may not reflect MHLIC and MHLIC partners. Our team strives to hold ourselves and invited experts accountable, and will address violations to our values and overall mission. Read our full disclaimer here.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
Indigenous communities have unique respect and traditions for bringing life into the world, but Indigenous women are three to four times more likely to die of complications related to pregnancy or childbirth than white women. A trained physician and member of the Oglala Lakota Tribe from Pine Ridge, South Dakota, Dr. Donald Warne is working to address those disparities through Indigenous medicine. In this episode, hosted by Amy Stiffarm—a member of the Aaniiih White Clay Tribe of Fort Belknap—learn about how Indigenous communities access healthcare and the uniquities of their maternal health needs.Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.MHLIC collaborates with many organizations and people for content such as the podcasts, videos, and webinar series. The statements , information, and opinions shared may not reflect MHLIC and MHLIC partners. Our team strives to hold ourselves and invited experts accountable, and will address violations to our values and overall mission. Read our full disclaimer here.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
After a difficult pregnancy and postpartum journey of her own, Ana Rodney founded MOMCares, a postpartum doula program designed to help support Black mothers in the NICU that are under-supported and facing financial stress. Ana is also chair of Baltimore's Maternal Mortality Review Board and a member of the Infant Mortality Review Board, and she's noticed a difference between the two: one is composed of professionals, institutions and government organizations, and the other of doulas and individuals with lived experiences. In this episode, hosted by UNC School of Medicine's Dr. Rachel Urrutia, hear why Ana thinks doctors and doulas coming together can lead to more positive health outcomes for birthing people and their babies.Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.MHLIC collaborates with many organizations and people for content such as the podcasts, videos, and webinar series. The statements , information, and opinions shared may not reflect MHLIC and MHLIC partners. Our team strives to hold ourselves and invited experts accountable, and will address violations to our values and overall mission. Read our full disclaimer here.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
Dr. Kira Schabram studies burnout as it relates to employees who view their work as a calling, as many healthcare workers do. So, how can you remind yourself that you're in the right place when you feel drained? In this episode, learn the signs of burnout to look out for and how to bounce-back from feelings of tiredness and cynicism in your work.Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.MHLIC collaborates with many organizations and people for content such as the podcasts, videos, and webinar series. The statements , information, and opinions shared may not reflect MHLIC and MHLIC partners. Our team strives to hold ourselves and invited experts accountable, and will address violations to our values and overall mission. Read our full disclaimer here.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
From the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Ellen Pliska and Britta Cedergren know that preventing maternal mortality and morbidity is crucial to promoting health across lifespan. Hosted by UNC Gillings School of Public Health’s Dr. Sarah Verbiest, this episode discusses the ways in which public health is succeeding, lacking and changing in its ways of supporting birthing people and their care providers. Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.MHLIC collaborates with many organizations and people for content such as the podcasts, videos, and webinar series. The statements , information, and opinions shared may not reflect MHLIC and MHLIC partners. Our team strives to hold ourselves and invited experts accountable, and will address violations to our values and overall mission. Read our full disclaimer here.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
Season two episodes of Maternal Health Innovation episodes will be released weekly. This season, we're including topics about provider burnout, public health, and sharing experiences and creating policies that are helping propel maternal health toward a better future in the U.S. Episode one is out now, so be sure to tune in!Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.MHLIC collaborates with many organizations and people for content such as the podcasts, videos, and webinar series. The statements , information, and opinions shared may not reflect MHLIC and MHLIC partners. Our team strives to hold ourselves and invited experts accountable, and will address violations to our values and overall mission. Read our full disclaimer here.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
In this episode, Erin McClain, assistant director at the UNC Collaborative of Infant and Maternal Health, is diving deep into the disparities Black birthing people face in care and education. Joined by Dr. Tanya Bass, an award-winning educator on sexual health and health inequities, the two discuss the challenges and—most importantly—what we can do as care providers and community leaders to improve access to treatment and education.Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.MHLIC collaborates with many organizations and people for content such as the podcasts, videos, and webinar series. The statements , information, and opinions shared may not reflect MHLIC and MHLIC partners. Our team strives to hold ourselves and invited experts accountable, and will address violations to our values and overall mission. Read our full disclaimer here.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
RMOMS is a federally funded grant program that seeks to improve maternal health in rural communities. The Texas and Missouri RMOMS representatives with us today that you'll hear from our awardees of the initial pilot between the federal Office of Rural Health Policy and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Today, we discuss innovative solutions these teams are implementing to address issues facing birthing people in rural areas.Today's guests are Anna Taranova, Barb Gleason, Mariluz Martinez, Susan Kendig, Rebecca Burger, and Morgan Nesselrodt.Today's episode is hosted by Tanisa Adimu, assistant project director at the Georgia Health Policy Center and is a co-leader of the Community Health Systems Development team. Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
For true innovation in maternal health to occur, we need to take a look at what works (and what needs improving) with maternal health in various cultures. On this episode, we discuss learning from tribal and indigenous cultures, and the programs and trainings involved. Today's guests are Heidi Christensen and Lynn Lane, Maternal Health Innovation Program Managers at Arizona Department of Health Services, and Reena Oza-Frank and Ali Stevens with Ohio Department of Health's Division of Maternal, Child, and Family Health.Today's episode is hosted by Kimberly Harper, the Perinatal Neonatal Outreach Coordinator with UNC Maternal and Infant Health.Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
Vanessa Caldari founded Mujeres Ayudando Madres because she I realized that midwifery care, especially in Puerto Rico, was really for people with access to the finances and the education to have that care. She didn't want midwifery care to be a privilege, so she did something about it.Vanessa Caldari is the founder of Mujeres Ayudando Madres, a nonprofit in Puerto Rico that supports birthing people from gestation to parenthood and helps them make informed birthing decisions.Today's episode is hosted by Leslie deRosset, implementation specialist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she works on maternal health child projects housed at Gillings School of Global Public Health.Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
In the Appalachian region, poverty is a huge concern. Too often, pregnant women miss appointments because they don't have the money for gas. Or they'll have a baby on Thursday and return to work on Monday because they need the paycheck. And breastfeeding can be seen as for "hillbillies" or "rednecks." For our guests today, they saw the problem and found a way to help - a hotline to address transportation gaps, access to care, and support during the pandemic.Stephanie Hutchinson is the Founder and President of Appalachian Breastfeeding Network (ABN), Kate Tuttle is the membership chair of ABN, and Jeanna Spears is the ABN secretary and librarian.Today's episode is hosted by Andrea Serano, Program Manager at Reaching Our Sisters Everywhere (ROSE).Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
Black women have twice the rate of preterm birth compared to white women, and that has persisted despite decades of research, despite differences in socioeconomic status, maternal education, access to prenatal care. When you pair or look at a Black woman and a white woman who are pregnant, the Black woman will have their baby early at twice the rate of white women. Nurse midwife, mindfulness teacher, and adjunct professor Karen Sheffield-Abdullah is trying to figure out why.Today's episode is hosted by Dr. Kristin Tully, co-chair of the MHLIC Innovation Support Core, and researcher at UNC Chapel Hill.Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
Eight years ago, when To-wen Tseng returned to work after giving birth to her first child, her right to pump at work was denied and the company refused to provide either a space or a break time to pump (lawsuit).Stevie Merino (Birthworkers of Color Collective) is a doula and lactation professional whose graduate school research focuses on Pacific Islander and Chamorro breastfeeding, chest feeding, birth traditions, and the disparities in birthing health outcomes.Today they discuss the fight for lactation rights.This episode is hosted by Dr. Kimarie Bugg, President and CEO of Reaching Our Sisters Everywhere Inc (ROSE).Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
The sad reality is that people in rural communities don't have as many resources to healthcare, and that includes adequate prenatal and maternity care. For Shaunette Howard, her biggest role is advocating for birthing people and their families so that they can get as many of the necessary resources as possible.Today's episode is hosted by Dr. Kristin Tully, co-chair of the MHLIC Innovation Support Core, and researcher at UNC Chapel Hill.Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
According to today's guest, Dr. Rachel Caskey, "stark disparities exist whereby Black women are nearly three times more likely to die from a pregnancy-related condition compared to white women. In addition, it is estimated that the majority of deaths are actually preventable."  Today, we talk about what can be done to fix these inequities and disparities.Dr. Rachel Caskey is the chief of the division of academic internal medicine and associate professor of internal medicine and pediatrics at University of Illinois - Chicago. She's also the principal investigator at I-PROMOTE Illinois.Today's episode is hosted by Katherine Bryant, Research Associate and Project Manager for the UNC Center for Maternal and Infant Health and a Project Director in the UNC Jordan Institute for Families.Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
For Birth Sisters Doula Services' LaToshia Rouse, becoming a doula changed her entire life because she gets to give people exactly what she wishes she had while delivering her 4 children (including triplets). According to LaToshia, "the reward is instant. It's addictive and you get to do it again and again, and you keep hearing the stories."  But unfortunaely, there's a dark side to stories, which include hearing about the maternal mortality statistics and mistreatment numbers. For LaToshia, that's just another opportunity to help. Today's episode is hosted by Dr. Kristin Tully, co-chair of the MHLIC Innovation Support Core, and researcher at UNC Chapel Hill. Learn more about us, explore our resource center and find support for all maternal health professionals at MaternalHealthLearning.org.Maternal Health Innovation is a product of the Maternal Health Learning and Innovation Center and is produced by Earfluence.Music provided by Graham Makes.This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U7CMC33636 State Maternal Health Innovation Support and Implementation Program Cooperative Agreement. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
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