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Face2Face with David Peck
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Face2Face with David Peck

Author: David Peck

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Face2Face is hosted by change maker David Peck and is rooted in casual conversation and intelligent inspiration. David interviews film makers, actors, writers and artists of various kinds and he does it in a fun, thoughtful and entertaining way. Check out this weekly podcast where David honors and celebrates people who believe in the power of little things, the splash and ripple effect and who are rolling up their sleeves to make the world a better place.

 



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Barry Avrich and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new film Oscar Peterson: Black & White, generosity, fear and confidence, music as a universal, the civil rights movement and Oscar’s Hymn To Freedom, and the alchemy of music.Learn more about Barry here and watch the film streaming Crave and HBO.Synopsis:Oscar Peterson: Black & White is a ground-breaking “docu-concert” that deeply explores the life and legacy of jazz icon and composer, Oscar Peterson: his sound, stardom, and cult of virtuoso. Oscar Peterson is the one jazz figure who had, and still has, the larger-than-life quality of jazz royalty. Other jazz artists from Ella Fitzgerald and Nat King Cole to Duke Ellington and John Coltrane became legends but Oscar, like Picasso or Mozart, had an undeniable style rooted not just in his genius but in his relentless performances and personality. The documentary delves into the seven-decade career of the musical genius: from his days as a child prodigy to the development of his signature sound on recordings with his trio, from his collaborations with huge stars to his shifts to brilliant solo performances around the world — as well as his tenacious experiences confronting racism and segregation while touring in the United States which culminated in his epic composition of Hymn to Freedom. Set against a backdrop of civil rights and racial discrimination, this “docu-concert” will examine an extraordinary life journey, from prodigy to legend.There was only one Oscar Peterson. As the man himself prophesied, “Ain’t but a few of us left.”About Barry:Acclaimed documentary filmmaker, Barry Avrich is responsible for over 50 documentaries and best known for provocative exposes of Hollywood power brokers such as Lew Wasserman (The Last Mogul), Harvey Weinstein (The Reckoning), Blurred Lines: Inside the Art World, David Foster: Off the Record and the critically acclaimed film Prosecuting Evil.Avrich has also produced the Scotiabank Giller Prize and Canadian Screen Awards broadcasts. In 2007, Avrich built the world’s first state-of-the-art movie theatre in a hospital at Toronto’s SickKids. Barry Avrich also directs and produces the prestigious Stratford Festival 'Stage to Screen' films.In 2016, Avrich released his best-selling memoir, Moguls, Monsters and Madmen.Image Copyright and Credit: Melbar Entertainment Group/Barry AvrichF2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Wi Ding HO and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his poetic, compelling and intimate new film Terrorizers, challenging the status quo, fragmented headlines, choice and responsibility, perspective, sympathy and loneliness and why we’re all just looking to be loved.Synopsis:“A slashing incident connects a group of disillusioned youths, in director Wi Ding HO’s powerful look at the truth beyond the headlines. A splendid, tragic fresco of the lost life of youths in pre-COVID Taipei, Terrorizers is his latest film. Ho returns to directing with a complex, multiple-narrative work that defies genre definitions and classic film structure. Reality can be captured through cinema, but there is a gap between what an image shows and what really is — between representation and the real world. What lies behind the headlines, what happens around tragedy, forms the prism of events at the core of Ho’s story of passion, love, and vengeance — illuminated fragments of scattered lives.Terrorizers is a powerful story that investigates the origins of violence and finds poetry within aesthetics, while giving voice to a remarkable ensemble cast.”With thanks to TIFF and Giovanna FulviAbout Wi Ding Ho:A graduate of NYU Tisch School of the Arts, born and raised in Malaysia and currently based in Taipei, Wi Ding HO is truly a versatile international filmmaker. Wi Ding’s audacity is not only reflected in the choice of his subjects but also in his stylistic approach. His audacious style was first noticed at Cannes’s Critics Week with his short film Respire, where it won two awards and later Best Fantasy Short Film at Sitges Fantasy International Award. Back in 2005, the film depicted a distant future where people were required to wear masks by law because of the air born virus.Wi Ding’s debut feature Pinoy Sunday was a comedy of manners, devoid of strong visuals, but rather focusing on performance and story. Wi Ding tackles the challenge of shooting a culture and a language both utterly foreign to him. He also continued to push the envelope as he defied the definition of Taiwanese Cinema with a film featuring 90% of non-Mandarin language and two non- Taiwanese leads. The film landed Wi Ding a much-coveted Chinese- Oscar Golden Horse Award for Best New Director.His last feature film Cities of Last Things, in the form of a triptych, pinpoints three extraordinary nights in the life of a common man, as told with reverse chronology.Each vignette examines his relationships with women, which result in life-changing events. It won the Platform Award at the Toronto International Film Festival andGrand Jury Prize in Beuane Film Festival of France, both voted unanimous by juries.Terrorizers is his latest feature film and is making its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival.Image Copyright and Credit: Changehe Films Ltd and Wing Di HoF2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Memory, Film & Faces

Memory, Film & Faces

2021-10-0920:43

Bianca Stigter and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Three Minutes - A Lengthening, Kodak memories, human stories and faces as traces, film as a record, family and history and why everyone wants to be seen.Synopsis:Three Minutes - A Lengthening presents a home movie shot by David Kurtz in 1938 in a Jewish town in Poland and tries to postpone its ending. As long as we are watching, history is not over yet.The three minutes of footage, mostly in colour, are the only moving images left of the Jewish inhabitants of Nasielsk before the Holocaust. The existing three minutes are examined to unravel the human stories hidden in the celluloid.The footage is imaginatively edited to create a film that lasts more than an hour. Different voices enhance the images. Glenn Kurtz, grandson of David Kurtz, provides his knowledge of the footage. Maurice Chandler, who appears in the film as a boy, shares his memories.Actress Helena Bonham Carter narrates the film essay.About Bianca:Bianca Stigter is an historian and cultural critic. She made the short film essays Three Minutes -Thirteen Minutes – Thirty Minutes (2014) and I Kiss This Letter - Farewell Letters from Amsterdammers (2018). She is associate producer of Steve McQueen’s feature films 12 Years a Slave and Widows. In 2019 she published the book Atlas of an Occupied City: Amsterdam 1940-1945.Image Copyright and Credit: Family Affair Films and Bianca StigterF2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Mourad Zaoui and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new film The Forgiven, idealism and access, the truth found in parables, the magic of newfoundland, walking the journey little by little and acknowledging and respecting others.Synopsis:Jessica Chastain, Ralph Fiennes, Caleb Landry Jones, Christopher Abbott, Saïd Taghmaoui, and Marie-Josée Croze lead a stellar ensemble cast in this wild foray into opulence, sin, and reckoning set deep in the Moroccan desert.On the verge of divorce, wealthy couple David (Fiennes) and Jo (Chastain, also appearing at the Festival in The Eyes of Tammy Faye) are on their way to a lavish weekend party, and accidentally run over and kill a young Moroccan man trying to sell fossils by the roadside. They put his body in their car and arrive at the party at a mansion hosted by a worldly gay couple. Once the body is tucked away in the bowels of the villa, the partygoers return to the circus of dancing, drugs, and debauchery. The next morning, David’s buzz becomes a hangover as he’s forced to reckon with the boy’s father and meet his own fate. For the others, the party must go on.Making his TIFF debut, John Michael McDonagh (The Guard) applies a Felliniesque lens towards the bourgeoisie, showing how their vapid pursuits prey on (or ignore) the livelihoods of others, sometimes with deadly results. The shimmer of these events, contrasted with the bleakness of the working class and Moroccan help who observe from the periphery, allows McDonagh to explore fatalistic themes of hedonism, neocolonialism, and the negligence of privilege.A weekend of fun reveals a world of oppression in this bold and sly critique driven by star-studded performances.With thanks to TIFFAbout Mourad:After earning his bachelor's degree in business communication at the Lycée Elbilia in Casablanca in 1999, he moved to New York City to study English at Queens College. It was there that he discovered his passion for theatre and cinema.In 2005, at the age of 25, Mourad was cast as the lead role in his first feature film, Wake Up Morocco. His first film role proved to be a difficult experience, as Mourad suffered from injuries from a motorcycle accident right before filming, as well as an appendicitis attack during filming. Despite these initial hurdles, Mourad persevered in his acting career, moving on to being cast in more than 60 film and television projects in Morocco and around the world.When he is not acting, Mourad enjoys surfing, fashion, motor sports, and martial arts.Image Copyright and Credit: Mourad Zaoui.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Kathryn Bertine and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new book Stand, activism, social change, the gender gap, beacons of hope, mental health and why things are not always as they seem.Buy the book here and learn more about Kathryn here.STAND: A memoir on Activism. A manual for progress. What really happens when we stand on the front lines of change.“I don’t have time for a blurb, but congratulations on your book!”Malcolm Gladwell.“When confronted with injustice, Kathryn Bertine didn't quit, and she didn't back down: she poured her heart and soul into confronting this injustice, and she emerged victorious. Kathryn's story is one of hope and perseverance despite the odds being stacked against her. Every girl and woman who's been told they can't play or keep up with the boys will take heart from this inspirational, life-affirming story.”Gabby Giffords, U.S. Congresswoman, Survivor & Activist.“On and off the bicycle, Kathryn Bertine has always chosen the challenging road. Whether it was her tenacious battle for equal road at the Tour de France, or her soul searching comeback from a traumatic crash, Bertine's career as an athlete and advocate has been marked by courage, determinedness and an unshakeable sense of humor. As a slowpoke on two wheels, I hate that a talented cyclist can also be a great writer, but STAND is an inspiring testament to the power of choosing the challenging road, and it demonstrates how lucky all of sports – not just cycling – is to have Kathryn Bertine.”Jason Gay, The Wall Street Journal. Author of Little Victories.“No one takes a stand like Kathryn Bertine. Rider, writer and above all activist she has fought long and hard for everyone to share the road. As a collaborator and interviewee she’s warm, witty and above all wise, as a writer she has the rare talent of infusing activism with humour and it’s her intelligence and humanity that makes STAND such a compelling, honest and kick ass (could substitute inspiring but you’re a kick ass) read.”Suze Clemitson, The GuardianAbout Kathryn: Kathryn Bertine is an author, athlete, activist and documentary filmmaker. During her pro career in cycling, she was a three-time Caribbean Champion, six-time national champion of St. Kitts and Nevis (SKN) and raced five years on pro circuit with four UCI domestic and World Tour teams Colavita, Wiggle-Honda, BMW and Cylance Pro Cycling. She retired from racing in 2017 but remains active in advancing equity for women’s pro cycling.Off the bike, Bertine is a filmmaker, activist, journalist and author of three nonfiction books, All the Sundays Yet to Come, As Good As Gold, and The Road Less Taken. From 2006 through 2012, Bertine was a columnist, author and senior editor for ESPN. When she pitched a documentary film on women’s pro cycling to ESPN in 2012, they rejected the proposal. So Bertine decided she would make it herself. After a two-year labor of love and crowdsourcing adventures, in 2014, HALF THE ROAD: The passion, pitfalls and power of women’s professional cycling was released. It won five film festivals, debuted in 16 nations, scored international distribution and successfully brought the hammer down on the corruption and sexism in sports. Half the Road is now available on iTunes, Vimeo, Amazon Prime and DVD. Five years later, she continues to receive royalties on a film ESPN said no one would watch.As an advocate for equality in women’s sports, Bertine then started the social activism movement Le Tour Entier in an effort to bring parity to women’s professional road cycling, starting with the Tour de France. She and her team succeeded, and women’s field was included in 2014 with the addition of La Course by Tour de France. In 2017, she founded (and currently serves as CEO for) Homestretch Foundation, which provides free housing to female professional athletes struggling with the gender pay gap. Bertine was featured on the cover of Bicycling Magazine and profiled in Outside Magazine for her platforms of implementing change in the world.As an activist, Bertine continues to serve as a public speaker/lecturer on equality and advocacy. She shares her journey and her message—that through passion, disruption, opportunity and focus, anything is possible and we’re all capable of effecting change—with corporations, universities and other professional outlets. She is currently at work on her fourth book. A native of Bronxville, NY she lives in Tucson, AZ. She holds a BA from Colgate University and an MFA from the University of Arizona and a PhD from The School of Hard Knocks. Image Copyright and Credit: Kathryn Bertine.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Brett Gaylor and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new film Discriminator, serendipitous creativity, privacy laws, facial recognition, digital ethics and human rights, data sets, remix culture, surveillance technology and automated decision making.TrailerWATCH the film here.Find out more about Brett and his work here.Synopsis:Discriminator, Brett Gaylor’s latest cautionary tale about life online, looks at the sea of faces we’ve willingly uploaded to social media and the consequences of our oversharing.As the Internet has evolved, so has documentarian Brett Gaylor’s attitude towards it. The filmmaker, who imagined a utopian future of shared creativity in 2008’s hit documentary feature RIP: A Remix Manifesto, began to sound the alarm in 2015 with his Peabody award winning series on digital privacy Do Not Track. Last year’s CBC documentary The Internet of Everything explored the implications of the Internet moving off of our screens and into the world around us with the Internet of Things.And in his latest film, the interactive documentary Discriminator, he looks at the vast global database of faces – captured without consent on social media and other platforms – and how it’s being used to hone facial recognition and other advances in artificial intelligence.Discriminator traces the almost accidental amassing of photos on digital sites through the beginning of this century, and follows through to the realization in 2015 by Yahoo/Flickr that this archive had limitless possibilities no one could have imagined. The subsequent cloning of these databases has been used to build technology used by US defence contractors, the Chinese military and the largest corporations on earth.In this interactive documentary, viewers can see how this technology works by activating their own webcams. While this may sound creepy, the film manages to stay away from fear-mongering territory with AI-assisted animation, interactive AR filters, a glitchy original score and Gaylor’s familiar voiceover. It’s the most fun you will have exploring surveillance capitalism.“We need to move beyond narratives around AI that are scary and grant the technology it’s own human agency,” says Gaylor, whose own wedding images play a role in his digital supply chain analysis. “What we need to understand is that these are technologies that we can shape, and that we are alive during a moment where we can set the course “People’s faces are being used for purposes over which they have no control. We need to have consent over our digital bodies - we need to make permission normal again.”About Brett:Brett’s documentaries The Internet of Everything, Do Not Track, OK Google, and Rip! A Remix Manifesto chronicled the Internet’s peril and promise. His AR documentary Fortune premiered at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival.Brett has received the International Documentary Association award, a Peabody Award, the Prix Gemaux and three Webbys.Image Copyright and Credit: Brett Gaylor and Imposter media.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Trevor and Ellen Scherer Crafts and Face2Face host David Peck talk about Street Gang, revolutionary ideas, the definition of genius, lightening in a bottle, TV as a wasteland and Kermit the Frog.TrailerFind out more about Street Gang here.Synopsis:Street Gang: How We Got To Sesame Street takes us inside the minds and hearts of the Sesame Street creators, artists, writers, and educators who, together established one of the most influential programs in television history.In late 1960s, Joan Ganz Cooney, a socially conscious female television executive was working in the fledgling world of public television. She was asked by friend Lloyd Morrisett, who worked for the Carnegie Corporation of New York and who specialized in the psychological studies of pre-school children, to take on revolutionary experiment. Could Joan create a children’s show that would "master the addictive qualities of television and do something good with them?"Inspired by the civil rights movement, Joan and Lloyd took this experiment one step further and began to envision using the new medium of television to educate all children, and specifically reach America’s "inner city" children to help close the educational gap that systemic racism and poverty had created. It was the right project, at the right time, and she needed the right group of people to make it happen.To harness the burgeoning power of television and create an educational, impactful, and entertaining show that could reach children nationwide. Cooney recruited visionary Muppets creator Jim Henson and acclaimed children’s television writer and director Jon Stone to craft the iconic and uplifting world of what became Sesame Street.Street Gang: How We Got To Sesame Street focuses on the first two experimental and groundbreaking decades of Sesame Street, highlighting this visionary "gang."With interviews with the original surviving creators, and their families, we hear and see how “the gang” came together. They share stories of the challenges and stumbling blocks involved to create the show and its iconic characters, and also speak to confronting boundaries that came their way with unflinching purpose. All with a wicked sense of humor, and pure joy. The gang knew that they were part of something that was special, critically important, and bigger than themselves.Street Gang: How We Got To Sesame Street reintroduces the world to Joan’s gang. With exclusive behind-the-scenes footage, and original cast and creator interviews, audiences will meet the people that audaciously interpreted radical changes in society and engaged children in ways that entertained and educated them like never before.Now is the perfect time to tell the story of the show’s origins and inspire people to use purpose, and the power of creativity, to make a positive impact in our world.About Trevor and Ellen:Known for creativity, flexibility, and a sense of humor, Trevor Crafts is a Producer/Director whose work has won an Emmy®, the LATV Festival, and 13 additional industry awards.With a visionary creative drive, strong leadership abilities, and a true understanding and passion for the cinematic arts, Trevor has spent his career creating dynamic stories with striking visuals featuring strong characters.His proven track record of leading studio teams to produce innovative story-driven content has helped film projects like the recently completed Sundance 2021 Premiere Street Gang: How We got to Sesame Street (2021) a feature length documentary on the origins of Sesame Street distributed by Screen Media and HBO, based on the book of the same name. Other Films include 7 Splinters in Time (2018) 12 Feet Deep (2016), Experimenter with Peter Sarsgaard and Winona Ryder (2015) which premiered at Sundance, Manson Family Vacation from the Duplass Brothers (2015), Deep in the Heart (2013) and Smokewood, Nevada (2013).In publishing, Trevor is currently working on The Unseen Photos of Street Gang a photo book of behind-the-scenes pictures from renown photographer David Attie. Also he recently released The Not-So Secret Society Graphic Novel for middle readers, published by BOOM! Studios, under their KaBoom imprint. BOOM! Studios also published his original IP series Lantern City in 2015.Ellen Scherer Crafts started her career in entertainment producing special events to include headline entertainment for Cesar’s Entertainment and live boxing co-productions with HBO and Telemundo. She went on to prominent roles in promotion and marketing in the corporate arena executing large scale meetings and product launches for Fortune 500 companies all over the world.Ellen partnered with her husband and producer Trevor Crafts to build Macrocosm Entertainment, helping to market their original transmedia property Lantern City and co-create the original children’s property The Not-So Secret Society. Ellen is a producer on the anticipated documentary Street Gang: How We Got To Sesame Street premiering in 2021.Image Copyright and Credit: Macrocosm and levelFilm.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Beans, Bridges & Oka

Beans, Bridges & Oka

2021-07-3038:52

Tracey Deer and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Beans, bridges under construction, storytelling and changing the world, persistence, forgiveness, how anger can guide us for good, listening well and why trauma doesn’t need to define us.TrailerFind out more about the film here and Tracey here.Synopsis:Beans is a coming-of-age story, inspired by co-writer/director Tracey Deer’s own experience as a 12-year-old Mohawk girl who had to grow up fast during the 1990 Oka Crisis, a 78-day armed stand-off between the Quebec/Canadian governments and the Mohawk who were peacefully protesting a golf course expansion that would desecrate their burial ground.Since debuting at TIFF 2020, the film has reaped many accolades – among them, Berlin’s Generation Kplus Crystal Bear for best film, two CSAs (Best Motion Picture and Best First Feature), TIFF Emerging Talent Award (Deer), TIFF Rising Stars (actor Rainbow Dickerson), TIFF’s Canada Top Ten, VIFF’s Best Canadian Film, VFCC’s One to Watch (actor Kiawentiio), DGC Discovery Award, and WGC Screenwriting Award for feature film.Beans (Kiawentiio) lives with her caring parents (Rainbow Dickerson and Joel Montgrand) and her little sister (Violah Beauvais) on the Mohawk reserve of Kahnawà:ke, Quebec, where the two girls happily play in the woods. Unprepared for the racism and violence that the Oka Crisis brings, Beans decides to transform into her own kind of warrior. “I was Beans,” says Deer. Using 200 local extras and partially shot in Kahnawà:ke (where Deer grew up) and nearby Kanesatake (where the protest began), the film is a Canadian production. Its female crew includes Deer, producer Anne-Marie Gélinas, executive producers Justine Whyte and Meredith Vuchnich (also co-writer), cinematographer Marie Davignon and editor Sophie Farkas-Bolla. Note: At age 13, Kiawentiio composed and performed the song for the end credits.About Tracey:Filmmaker Tracey Deer is a Mohawk filmmaker with multiple credits to her name, as a producer, writer and director. She currently resides in Kahnawake, her home reserve in Quebec.Deer began her professional career with CanWest Broadcasting in Montreal, and later joined Rezolution Pictures to co-direct One More River: The Deal that Split the Cree, with Neil Diamond (Cree), which won the Best Documentary Award at the 2005 Rendez-vous du cinema québécois in Montreal and was nominated for Best Social/Political Documentary at the Geminis.Deer formed Mohawk Princess Pictures in 2006, which produced her first short fiction called Escape Hatch, a dramedy about the romantic misadventures of a Mohawk woman on her quest for love. She also wrote, directed and filmed Mohawk Girls, about the lives of three teenagers, and herself as a teen, growing up in Kahnawake, which won the Alanis Obomsawin Best Documentary Award at the 2005 imagineNATIVE Film & Media Arts Festival.Currently, she has multiple projects in development, including a 3D feature documentary and a fiction feature screenplay.Tracey received a B.A. in film studies from Dartmouth College in 2000, graduating with two awards for excellence. In 2009, she shared the Don Haig Award with colleague Brett Gaylor for overall career achievement as an emerging filmmaker. In 2008, Playback Magazine declared her one of the 25 rising stars in the Canadian entertainment industry. She is also a member of The Writer’s Guild of Canada."Tracey represents the next wave of native filmmaking," says Adam Symansky, NFB producer of Mohawk Girl and Club Native. "It isn't based on the past so much ason native communities taking responsibility and control of their future. That is the challenge she is putting out in her films."Image Copyright and Credit: Tracey Deer and EMA Films.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Saul Williams, Motion and Face2Face host David Peck talk about their new film Akilla’s Escape, extended family, lived experience, existence as resistance, racialized capitalism, poetry, art and pushing boundaries and why it may not be a great idea to dabble in hope or cynicism.TrailerFind out more about the film here.Synopsis:Akilla’s Escape weaves the present and past in a crime-noir about the urban child-soldier. Set in Toronto and New York where over 450,000 Jamaicans reside, the story speaks to the historical criminalization of black boys that modern society overlooks.Akilla Brown is forty years old and for the first time in his life, the clandestine cannabis grow operation he runs is legit. Only one year into government approvedlegalization, the pendulum of hypocrisy takes a toll and Akilla decides to cash out. While making a routine delivery on a cool, summer night, destiny takes anunexpected turn when Akilla confronts a firestorm of masked youths in an armed robbery.In the aftermath of the heist, Akilla captures one of the thieves, a mute fifteen-year-old boy named Sheppard. Upon learning thebandits are affiliated with the Garrison Army, a Jamaican crime syndicate his grandfather founded. Akilla is forced to reckon with a cycle of violence he thought he escaped.About Saul Williams:Saul Williams came to public attention after the release of the internationally acclaimed film Slam, which he co-wrote and starred in. Slam introduced the world to the Slam poetry movement and won Sundance’s Grand Jury Prize and the Cannes Camera D’Or in 1998.Saul holds a B.A. in Philosophy and Drama from Morehouse College and an M.F.A. in acting from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. He has performed in over 30 countries with invitations that have spanned from the White House, the Sydney Opera House, Lincoln Center, The Louvre, The Getty Center, Queen Elizabeth Hall, to villages, townships, community centers, and prisons across the world.Saul has published five books of poetry and 7 musical albums. On stage, he was chosen for the lead role in Holler If Ya Hear Me, a Broadway musical featuring music by Tupac Shakur and he has appeared in numerous films and television shows. He is currently working on his directorial debut Neptune Frost.Wendy "Motion" BraithwaiteWendy Motion Brathwaite is a Canadian musician, writer and activist from Toronto, Ontario. She is most noted as cowriter with Charles Officer of the screenplay for the 2020 film Akilla's Escape, for which they won the Canadian Screen Award for Best Original Screenplay at the 9th Canadian Screen Awards in 2021.She also wrote the short films A Man's Story (2016) and Theodore (2020) and has worked as a story editor on the television series Coroner.She has performed as a hip hop artist and spoken word poet under the stage name Motion, and released the CD Motion in Poetry: The Audio Xperience and has also published the poetry collections Motion in Poetry and 40 Dayz, and has written theatrical plays including Oraltorio: A Theatrical Mixtape, 4our Woman, Aneemah’s Spot, Loveleigh’s Logue, Nightmare Dream and Rebirth of the Afronauts: A Black Space Odyssey.Image Copyright and Credit: Cane Sugar FilmWorks.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Nicole Dorsey and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Black Conflux, identity and uncertainty, empathy, attitude and ego, staying present, humility in asking good questions and why what you do next really matters.Watch the film now online.TrailerFind out more about Nicole and the film here.Synopsis:“The lives of an anxious teenage girl and a troubled man converge fatefully, in Nicole Dorsey’s vivid debut exploring womanhood and toxic masculinity.“Black Conflux is a constant visual delight.” –Stephen Dalton, The Hollywood ReporterSet in suburban Newfoundland in 1987, Nicole Dorsey’s debut feature is a dreamy account of two converging lives.Fifteen-year-old Jackie (Ella Ballentine) is navigating the tricky transition between vulnerable adolescence and impending adulthood. The film opens with Jackie auditioning for her school choir with a gorgeous rendition of “Hey, Who Really Cares?”, by obscure early-’70s psychedelic folk singer Linda Perhacs. It’s a symbolic overture for a promising young woman from a broken home. Raised by her aunt and living under the cloud of all the disappointments endured by the women in her family, Jackie finds herself giving in to internal and external pressures — partying, skipping school, and hitchhiking — in search of her own identity. Her choices leave her speeding inevitably towards Dennis (Ryan McDonald), a socially inept loner with a volatile dark streak and delusional fantasies of adoring women at his beck and call.Black Conflux is a vibrant and stunning debut, one that shies away from conventions common to small-town coming-of-age stories. Dorsey exhibits an inspiring cinematic style — both assured and mature — as she reflects on the past and her own experience. Exploring womanhood, isolation, and toxic masculinity, Black Conflux is a bracingly relevant narrative for today.”With thanks to Ravi Srinivasan and TIFFAbout Nicole:Nicole Dorsey is a Canadian film director and screenwriter, whose debut feature film, Black Conflux, premiered at the 2019 Toronto International Film Festival.The film was subsequently named to TIFF's annual year-end Canada's Top Ten list for 2019, and received a nomination for the John Dunning Best First Feature Award at the 8th Canadian Screen Awards in 2020.A native of Burlington, Ontario, she is a graduate of the film studies program at Ryerson University. She directed a number of short films prior to Black Conflux, including Ivadelle (2009), Pop the Grapes (2013), Dennis (2015), Star Princess (2015) and Arlo Alone (2018).Image Copyright and Credit: Nicole Dorsey and Band With Productions.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
CJ Hunt and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his film The Neutral Ground, memory and racial justice, rewriting history, propaganda, troubling stories we tell and why it’s time to be honest, out loud and in public.TrailerFind out more about CJ and the film here and you can watch the film here on PBS and through WNED in Canada.Synopsis:An official selection of the 2021 Tribeca Film Festival, The Neutral Ground begins in 2015 as Hunt documents a raucous New Orleans City Council meeting about the removal of four Confederate monuments. It quickly becomes apparent just how divided white and Black residents are on the meaning of the city's statues. This tension between what to Hunt seems obvious – that the statues should be removed – and the fervor with which so many people oppose this view opens an opportunity for him to try and understand the mythology of the Confederacy and why Americans are willing to put so much on the line to guard its stone remnants.When death threats halt the removals in New Orleans, Hunt hits the road, travelling across the South to try and understand why a losing army from 1865 still holds so much political and imaginative power in contemporary America.Executive producer Roy Wood Jr. notes, “This film tells the story of people courageously dragging this nation into a promising and progressive conversation about racial reckoning. It’s also the story of those who refuse to admit that this reckoning has arrived." Raised in Birmingham, Alabama, a correspondent on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah and known as one of the country's most incisive comedians on issues of race, Wood continues, "CJ’s approach to this topic ties into a much larger question facing America: How do we heal this nation’s deepest wounds when there are still so many people who won’t acknowledge those wounds exist?”About CJ:A comedian and filmmaker living in NYC, CJ is currently a field producer on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah. He has also served as a staff writer for A&E's Black and White, and a field producer for BET's The Rundown with Robin Thede.Before working in late night, CJ spent nine years living in New Orleans where - in 2015 - he began filming what he thought would be a quick and easy confederate monument removal.CJ is an alumnus of Firelight Media's Doc Lab and New Orleans Film Festival's Emerging Voices program. He is also a 2020 New America Fellow and a regular host of The Moth.A graduate from Brown University's Africana Studies department, CJ is endlessly fascinated by race and comedy's ability to say what we can't.Image Copyright and Credit: CJ HuntF2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Guns, Fact & Fake News

Guns, Fact & Fake News

2021-06-1443:05

Marc Silver and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his film 3.5 minutes, cities designed to separate, bridge building, racism, gun violence, fact versus fake news, vertical learning curves and justice through storytelling.TrailerFind out more about Marc here and stream the film here.Synopsis:Black Friday 2012: four boys in a red SUV pull into a gas station after spending time at the mall buying sneakers and talking to girls. With music blaring, one boy exits the car and enters the store, a quick stop for a soda and a pack of gum.A man and a woman pull up next to the boys in the station, making a stop for a bottle of wine. The woman enters the store, and an argument breaks out when the driver of the second car asks the boys to turn the music down.3½ minutes and ten bullets later, one of the boys is dead.About Marc:Marc Silver is an award-winning filmmaker and director of the Oscar shortlisted and Emmy nominated feature doc, 3 ½ Minutes, Ten Bullets. It premiered at the Sundance Festival 2015 winning the U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Social Impact.His first feature length film Who is Dayani Cristal? premiered at the Sundance Festival 2013, where it won the Cinematography Award: World Cinema Documentary and the Amnesty International Best Documentary Award 2014.In 2017 his third feature length film To End A War about the peace process with the FARC was released in Colombia.From 2018-20 Marc has been embedded inside Amnesty International researching ideas related to future technologies and their impact on human rights. The work has led to a short film about the profound gene editing tool CRIPSR, as well as a series of ideas with Shoshana Zuboff, author of The Age Of Surveillance Capitalism, and Christopher Wylie who whistle blew the Cambridge Analytica/Facebook story.He is completing his latest feature length documentary The World Is Forest in spring 2021.Image Copyright and Credit: Motto Pictures and Candescent Films.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Aidan Turner and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new TV series Leonardo, mystery and wonder, curiosity, nature versus nurture, solving puzzles, ego, painting the details and why humility is underrated.TrailerSynopsis:A compelling look at one of the most restlessly brilliant men of all time, Leonardo gets inside the mind of the genius, showing the drama behind his art, and exploring a tantalizing mystery left unexplained by biographers – the nature of his relationship with the model Caterina da Cremona.Caterina’s apparent murder – and the painting’s disappearance – make for a mystery full of twists and turns that takes us through the key years of Leonardo’s artistic life, leading to a thrilling climax nearly as ingenious as one of Leonardo’s own creations.About Aidan:Aidan Turner was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1983. After graduating from the Gaiety School of Acting in 2004, Aidan appeared in a number of stage productions, many with Ireland's national theatre, The Abbey. Such productions included The Plough & The Stars, Romeo & Juliet and A Cry from Heaven. In 2008, Turner made the transition to movies and television with a lead role in the film Alarm and a co-starring role in the popular Irish TV drama The Clinic.In 2009, Turner moved to the UK to take on a starring role in BBC's acclaimed Being Human. Aidan played the spellbinding Mitchell for 3 seasons during which time he also starred in BBC's Desperate Romantics and BBC's top rated TV movie Hattie. In 2011, famed director Peter Jackson cast Turner in the role of Kili in JRR Tolkien's The Hobbit. The highly successful movie trilogy filmed for approximately two years in New Zealand during which time Aidan also starred in Cassandra Clare's The Mortal Instruments.In 2014 Turner was cast as Poldark in the BBC remake. Poldark premiered to excellent rating in the UK in March 2015 and also in the USA in June 2015. The BBC series also aired across Europe and Australia and returned for a second series, aired during 2016.In 2015 Aidan took on a small role in The Secret Scripture so he could work with one of his favorite directors, Jim Sheridan. He also voiced a role in the first painted animation movie, Loving Vincent, co-starred in the dark comedy, Look Away and starred in the BBC mini-series, And Then There Were None.With thanks to IMDBImage Copyright and Credit: Sony Pictures Entertainment.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Wuhan, Heroes & Hope

Wuhan, Heroes & Hope

2021-05-2335:45

Yung Chang and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new, memorable and hopeful film Wuhan Wuhan, empathy, universals, hatred and division, humanizing statistics and tragedy, everyday heroes and the poetic history of a city.Find out more about the film here.Synopsis:Wuhan Wuhan is an observational documentary unfolding during February and March, 2020 at the height of the pandemic in Wuhan city, where the coronavirus began. With unprecedented access at the peak of the pandemic lockdown, Wuhan Wuhan goes beyond the statistics and salacious headlines and puts a human experience into the early days of the mysterious virus as Chinese citizens and frontline healthcare workers grappled with an invisible, deadly killer.The film focuses on five heart-wrenching and endearing stories: a soft-hearted ER doctor and an unflappable ICU nurse from the COVID-19 hospital; a compassionate volunteer psychologist at a temporary hospital; a tenacious mother and son who are COVID-19 patients navigating the byzantine PRC healthcare system; and a volunteer driver for medical workers and his 9-month pregnant wife whose heartfelt story forms the backbone of this film. In a time when the world needs greater cross-cultural understanding, Wuhan Wuhan is an invaluable depiction of a metropolis joining together to overcome a crisis.About Yung:Yung Chang is the director of Up the Yangtze, China Heavyweight and The Fruit Hunters. He is currently completing a screenplay for his first dramatic feature, Eggplant, which was selected in 2015 to participate in the prestigious Sundance Labs.Chang’s films have premiered at international film festivals including Sundance, Berlin, Toronto, and IDFA and have played theatrically in cinemas around the world. Up the Yangtze was one of the top-grossing documentary releases in 2008. In 2013, China Heavyweight became the most widely screened social-issue documentary in Chinese history with an official release in 200 Mainland Chinese cinemas.His films have been critically acclaimed, receiving awards in Paris, Milan, Vancouver, San Francisco, the Canadian Genie, Taiwan Golden Horse, Cinema Eye Honors, among others and have been nominated at Sundance, the Independent Spirit Awards and the Emmys. Chang's films have been shown on international broadcasters including PBS, National Geographic, ARTE, ZDF, Channel 4, HBO, TMN, NHK, CBC, TV2, SBS and EBS. Chang is the recipient of the Don Haig Award, the Yolande and Pierre Perrault Award, and the Guggenheim Emerging Artist Award.He is a member of the Directors Guild of Canada. In 2013, he was invited to become a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.Image Copyright and Credit: Yung Chang and Kartemquin Films.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Cody Westman and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new film Hell or Clean Water, the environment, activism, awareness, confidence and doubt, how change takes time and how one person can make a difference and why everyone should try.TrailerSynopsis:Shawn Bath is an unlikely environmentalist. Just 10 years ago he was throwing garbage out his truck window. But as a commercial diver in Newfoundland, Shawn has seen ‘everything that mankind doesn’t want’. The harbours in the province are full of tires, bottles, boat parts and fishing equipment, a world-wide problem that is ‘out of sight, out of mind’.After meeting his girlfriend Staunene, Shawn has a change of heart and is now hell bent on cleaning up the trash that’s littering the bottom of the Atlantic. He quits his job and devotes all his time and energy into his new cause Clean Harbours Initiative, relying solely on donations while he tries to secure government funding.The problem? He only has $9 in his bank account; creditors are calling daily and the funds aren’t coming in fast enough. Shawn is also a former seal hunter and one of the first groups to step up and help with his cause is the International Fund for Animal Welfare, an animal rights group that is against the commercial seal hunt, and therefore hated in Newfoundland.But Shawn will take help from anyone willing to assist him in cleaning up the mammoth issue of trash in his beloved ocean. In this David and Goliath story, Shawn risks everything to keep his waters clean. But with so much to care about in the world today, will the help ever arrive?About Cody:Cody Westman lives in in St. John's NL, Canada and is the owner of CatsEyeCinema Inc. - a video production company where Cody directs, shoots and edits, but also hires and collaborates with some of the best freelance film makers around.Cody has been involved in the film and entertainment industries in Montreal, Vancouver and St. John's since 1999. Since 2013, he has directed/produced/edited videos and commercials for countless corporations in Canada such as VICE, Canadian Tire, Amex, Hockey Canada, WWF, Atlantic Lottery and more. He has also directed 4 short films and many music & comedy projects.Check out the company demo reel HERE.Cody lives in St. John’s NL with his wife, 2 young boys and a cat named Miles.Image Copyright and Credit: Cody Westman and Little Heat FilmsF2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Jason Sherman and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new film My Tree, fresh starts and gifts, staying inquisitive, conscience and push back, mysteries that unfold, belief systems and stories that are used to suppress.Synopsis:Jason Sherman, a Canadian Jew, searches for the tree that was planted in his name in Israel many years earlier.His travels take him to parks and forests throughout the country, where he learns a number of surprising facts about his tree: that it was likely a pine; that it was chosen because it grows fast; that it was completely wrong for the Israeli climate — and that it is sitting atop the remains of a Palestinian village that was captured and destroyed in 1967.Deeply disturbed by his findings, Jason returns home, determined to learn how it is he never knew these things — and what he should do now that he knows them.About Jason:Jason Sherman is one of Canada’s most influential and prolific playwrights, with a multi-award-winning body of work that has been produced around the world, including the US, UK and China. Among his plays are Patience, It’s All True, The Retreat and Three in the Back, Two in the Head, which won the Governor General’s Award for Drama.Sherman has also written extensively for the screen, notably the docudramas Jonestown: Paradise Lost, and We Were Children, about Canada’s residential schools system, as well as numerous one-hour dramas for network and cable television, including two shows he executive produced: Bloodletting & Miraculous Cures and The Listener. He also created and wrote a number of radio dramas for the CBC, including two long-running series: National Affairs and Afghanada.My Tree is his first feature-length documentary as both writer and director.Image Copyright and Credit: Jason Sherman.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
June Millington, director Bobbi Jo Hart and Face2Face host David Peck talk about their fun, engaging, long overdue new film Fanny: The Right to Rock. They touch on sexism in the industry, liberation, your inner compass, poetry, safe spaces and role models, racism and why it’s so important to play it forward.“Revivify Fanny. And my work will be done.” David BowieTrailerTo learn more about the band and their work head here.For more information about IMA go to www.ima.orgSynopsis:Fanny: The Right to Rock opens with the words of David Bowie, bemoaning the band’s fate: “One of the most important bands in American rock has been buried without a trace.” The film then takes us deep into the woods of Goshen, Massachusetts, where we discover the Institute for the Musical Arts. It’s an underground music camp and recording studio for girls and women only, where Fanny lead guitarist June Millington, 69, has been teaching young girls to rock out long before rock camps became “a thing.”There, she and fellow Filipina-American bandmates, including her bass-playing sister Jean and drummer Brie Darling, celebrate their 50-year reunion with a new rock record deal -- cheekily titled Fanny Walked the Earth. If the stars align, it’s a chance to right the wrongs of music history.Fanny: The Right to Rock juxtaposes an intimate, cinema verité journey of Fanny’s uphill battle to complete and release their new album, with the fascinating herstory of the band’s improbable journey during their 70s heyday. Their controversial, self-penned lyrics dared embrace the newfound freedom of birth control as well as the trauma of the Vietnam War.Discovered early on by the secretary of legendary producer Richard Perry and signed as teenagers to the epic Warner/Reprise label,Fanny honed their signature sound in edgy L.A. clubs like The Troubadour. Fanny Hill, hosted regular jam sessions with visitors/crashers including Joe Cocker, Little Feat, and Bob Dylan’s The Band. There, serious rock & roll comingled with sex, drugs and skinny dipping.Fanny toured extensively across North America and Europe with major groups including Slade, Chicago and Ike & Tina Turner. They toured while writing, recording and releasing a new album every year from 1970 -75. They performed live and gave interviews on major network TV shows with Dick Cavett, Sonny & Cher, Helen Reddy and The Tonight Show, as well as the famed BBC show “The Old Grey Whistle Test”.The movie includes testimonials from Kate Pierson of the B-52s, Bonnie Raitt, Cherie Currie of The Runaways, Kathy Valentine of the Go-Gos, and Bowie bassist Gail Ann Dorsey. Male music icons also sing their praises including Todd Rundgren, Charles Neville of The Neville Brothers, The Lovin’ Spoonful’s John Sebastian and Def Leppard’s Joe Elliott (who unveils a Fanny flexi-disc he has saved for 50 years, since he discovered the band at age 12).About June Millington and Bobbi Jo Hart:Bobbi Jo Hart is an award winning American/Canadian documentary filmmaker with Adobe Productions International, based in Montreal, Canada. With a career that has spanned 25 years, Hart has filmed in countries as diverse as Pakistan, Russia, Guatemala, Australia, Scotland and Zimbabwe — with subjects ranging from women’s professional soccer and tennis to classical music, comedy, dance and manic depression. Her documentary films have the most common thread of revealing untold stories of marginalized girls and women, weaving universal threads of dreams, family, love, loss, happiness, sadness, success, failure and determination. Her intimate, cinema verité style results in thought-provoking films that ultimately celebrate our shared humanity.Her most recent feature documentary I Am Not A Rock Star premiered at dozens of worldwide film festivals and was broadcast on networks in many countries, including BBCFour, SVT Sweden, ABC Australia, Documentary Channel. Music in the film included Jack Johnson & Patrick Watson. This film won many festival awards as well. Hart’s previous award-winning films include SHE GOT GAME: Behind-the-Scenes of the Women's Tennis Tour (LIFE Network, Starz), which had exclusive access during over a year on tour. Hart is currently starting the festival tour for her exclusive theatrical documentary celebrating Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo (Documentary Channel, ARTV).June Millington “one of the hottest female guitarists in the industry” wrote, Guitar Player Magazine has been making music since she was a child playing ukulele in her native Philippines. Having moved from Manila to California in the early sixties, she and her sister bassist Jean turned in their folk guitars for electric and formed a succession of all-girl bands. By ‘69 they were in Hollywood with their band Fanny, which was one of the first all-women’s rock band to be signed to a major label (Reprise). Through five successful albums and extensive touring of Europe and North America, Fanny served notice that women could do more than simply sing, they could write and play passionate rock ‘n roll. As David Bowie said of the group in an interview with Rolling Stone (RS January 2000): “They were extraordinary: They wrote everything...they are as important as anyone else who’s ever been, ever....”Fanny played with major artists like Chicago, BB King, Dr John, the Kinks, the Staples Singers, Ike and Tina Turner, & Chuck Berry - and recorded an album at Apple Studios with Geoff Emerick, the Beatles engineer. June left the band in 1973 and continued to record and perform with her sister and on a number of solo albums. She played in the genre of women’s music for many years, and produced records by artists Cris Williamson, Holly Near, Mary Watkins, Melanie DeMore, and Bitch and Animal, among others. She is the co-founder and Artistic Director of the non-profit Institute for the Musical Arts [IMA], an internationally known teaching, performing and recording facility supporting women and girls in music and music-related business. Founded by June, along with partner Ann Hackler, activist/writer Angela Davis, and engineer/producer Roma Baran, IMA expanded into a 25- acre campus in Goshen, MA which runs five residential summer programs for girls and young women from 9-24 and hosts shows and workshops with established artists the rest of the year.Millington has received numerous awards for her achievements including the Audio Engineering Society’s Lifetime Achievement award, the Bay Area Career Women’s LAVA award for being a “leg- end of women’s music,” the Outmusic Heritage Award and in 2007 she, along with the other members of FANNY, received the Rockrgrl Women of Valor Award at Berklee College of Music. In 2013 she received New England Public Radio’s (NEPR) Arts and Humanities Outstanding Individual of the Year Award, the Veteran Feminists of America Award and, along with her partner Ann Hackler the Outstanding Activist Award from the Living Kindness Foundation. In 2015 she was given an award for her contributions by the National Women’s Music Festival.June released her autobiography Land of a Thousand Bridges: Island Girl in a Rock ‘n Roll World in June of 2015 and has received a great deal of press, including articles in MS Magazine, Pitchfork and Newsweek as well as on NPR. Millington continues to perform, write and record and teaches at IMA as well as colleges and universities around North America.Image Copyright and Credit: Adobe Productions International and Bobbi Jo Hart.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Chris J. Russo, Sue Taylor, Chiah Rodriques and Face2Face host David Peck talk about their new film Lady Buds, Cannabis, big business, trailblazing, racism, sexism, happy accidents, the war on drugs and our authentic selves.More about the movie here.See it at Hot Docs 2021Synopsis:Following the widely praised 2016 decision to legalize cannabis in California, six courageous women emerge from the shadows to enter the new commercial industry. As farmers, entrepreneurs and activists, these modern-day pioneers find their initial optimism is quickly replaced with uncertainty and fear as the new legislation favors deep pocketed corporations. Those who shaped the foundations of the cannabis industry for decades soon find themselves struggling to fight for their piece of the American Dream in a market they helped create.Lady Buds features second-generation cannabis farmer Chiah Rodriques, 72-year-old African American retired Catholic school principal turned dispensary owner Sue Taylor, Latinx queer activist Felicia Carbajal, serial entrepreneur Karyn Wagner, and Humboldt elders The Bud Sisters. Their stories speak to the many opportunities and issues facing commercial cannabis today: the complicated dynamics of raising a family on a cannabis farm, the ongoing fight for those adversely affected by the War on Drugs, educating seniors citizens about the healing power of cannabis, and honoring the LGBTQ activists who fought for legalizing medical marijuana over 25 years ago.At every turn these trailblazers defy stereotypes, while revealing that cannabis is much more than a plant-it's a community.ln her feature debut, award-winning filmmaker Chris J. Russo offers an insightful journey into the lives and work of the women who are the backbone of the cannabis culture in California. Their struggles and triumphs paint a picture of an industry in fux as it grapples with preserving its storied heritage while looking toward the future.About Chris, Chiah and Sue:Chris J. Russo's award-winning short films have screened all over the world, including the Sundance Film Festival, and have been broadcast on Showtime, PBS, lFC, LOGO and NETFLlX. She is a 2018 fellow of the Sundance lnstitute/Women ln Film Financing lntensive with Lady Buds, and is also a fellow of Film lndependent's Director and Screenwriters Labs, with her project, Directed By Dorothy Arzner. Notable short film credits include, A Woman Reported, about the moments before a hate crime occurs; Size 'em Up, a coming of age story; Straight Down The Aisle: Confessions of Lesbian Bridesmaids, winner of the Outfest Best Short Documentary Award for its poignant view on marriage non-equality (pre-Prop 8); and numerous music videos.After receiving two art degrees in Photography - a BFA from the University of Buffalo and MFA from the Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, NY - Russo moved to Hollywood and worked for Kodak for 15 years and as a Post Production Supervisor on over 15 feature films. Russo is an exhibited fine art photographer, with recent group shows in Los Angeles, West Hollywood and Beverly Hills. She has dedicated the last four years to producing and directing Lady Buds, her first feature film, which will be having its World Premiere at Hot Docs 2021.Sue Taylor is a 72-year old retired Catholic school principal whose mission is to open the first cannabis dispensary for seniors citizens to offer alternatives to pharmaceuticals. As an African- American businesswoman in a white, male-dominated industry, Sue presses forward despite financial concerns, repeated delays and the frustrations of dealing with the local bureaucracy.Chiah Rodriques grew cannabis plants under blackberry trees and hid from federal helicopters growing up. As an adult and second-generation farmer, she's lived most of her life in the shadows until California legalized cannabis, which offered her the opportunity to become a permitted cultivator. With the price of weed dropping and a leap of faith into the unknown, Chiah must find balance between working on the farm and parenting her two sons amidst the harsh financial pressures of legalization.Image Copyright and Credit: Chris J. Russo.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Louise Detlefsen and May Bjerre Eiby and Face2Face host David Peck talk about their beautiful new film It Is Not Over Yet, community, compassionate care, family and belonging, living with dementia and the ethical demands of others. TrailerTo learn more about May Bjerre Eiby and her books work check out the website here.Synopsis:It Is Not Over Yet is an immersive, life-affirming journey into the day-to-day rhythm of a controversial nursing home for people with dementia in Denmark. The founding nurse of Dagmarsminde, May Bjerre Eiby, has no interest in specific dementia diagnoses or medicine since neither improves the quality of life for her 11 residents. Instead, she and her staff have developed a new kind of treatment inspired by the methods introduced by Florence Nightingale 150 years ago, as well as Danish philosopher Løgstrup."Compassion Treatment," as May calls it, prioritizes hugs, touch, talking, humor, eye contact, cake, nature, bubbles, and the joy of community. Having suffered the painful loss of her father due to neglect at a nursing home, Bjerre Eiby is determined to inspire a complete change in the way people with dementia are treated in the healthcare system, prioritizing holistic care and kindness over medication of any kind.Filmmaker Louise Detlefsen’s vérité approach offers unique access into the intimate and sometimes intense moments between residents and caregivers, providing a rarely seen and uplifting experience of aging with dignity, grace, and joyAbout Louise and May:Louise Detlefsen, age 50, is one of Denmark’s most experienced documentary filmmakers. Louise has directed numerous documentaries reaching a wide audience. The films show strong solidarity with the characters while achieving a strong artistic expression and have often raised public debate about the issues of the film. Louise Detlefsen’s latest documentary feature film, Fat Front, had its international premiere at IDFA 2019 in the Frontlight section. Her films have been shown on both television and at festivals all over Europe, and her debut film From Barbie to Babe premiered at IDFA.From a young age, Louise Detlefsen has worked with storytelling, trying out scriptwriting, and she is the author of a political biography about one of Denmark’s most remarkable female politicians Ritt Bjerregaard, also an EU commissioner. Louise Detlefsen graduated from the Danish School of Journalism in 1996 and since 2000 she has been working as a documentary filmmaker.Louise has also worked in close collaboration with Louise Unmack Kjeldsen with whom she’s directed a number of documentary films and series. She lives in Copenhagen with her husband, cinematographer Per Fredrik Skiöld and their blended family of four children.May Bjerre Eiby, born in 1981, is a certified nurse, with a Masters degree in Nursing from the University of Aarhus in Denmark. Eiby primarily worked at nursing homes and hospitals with elderly patients, before single-handedly establishing her own nursing home north of Copenhagen for people with dementia in 2016.Her new form of treatment, which is entirely based on caring, personal contact, and active engagement with both the residents and their relatives, has successfully eliminated the use of anti-psychotic medicines and sedatives.Eiby has given lectures around the world on the current state of dementia care and her treatment, and she recently won the Fonsmark prize, a prestigious award given to Danish citizens who have raised public awareness about social issues.Image Copyright and Credit: Louise Detlefsen and First Hand Films and Fathom Film Group.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Ann Shin and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Artificial Immortality, biotech & empathy, rogue technology, trans humanism and memory, carbon footprints, Deepak Chopra and robot priests.TrailerSee it at Hot Docs 2021 and CRAVE – eventually.Synopsis:If you could create an immortal version of yourself, would you? Until recently, that question was the stuff of science fiction, but now experts in the fields of artificial intelligence and robotics suggest it will be possible.Artificial Immortality explores the latest advancements in AI, robotics and biotech as it poses the questions: what is the essence of being human, and can it be replicated? The technology in this field is exploding and it’s become a pressing issue as more and more of our lives is played out online.Visionaries, writers and thinkers such as: Nick Bostrom, Martine Rothblatt, Hiroshi Ishiguro, Douglas Rushkoff, Ben Goertzel and Deepak Chopra, explore how humanity is advancing toward a post-biological world of intelligence without bodies. As scientists point to a world where humans and machines are merged, we have to ask ourselves, will AI be the best, or the last thing we ever do?About Ann:Ann is a multiple award-winning Director and Producer known for compelling documentaries and series. Her feature documentary, Artificial Immortality was selected to be the Opening Night film at HotDocs 2021.Her previous film My Enemy, My Brother won Grand Jury Prize at SDAIFF, the short version was shortlisted for a 2016 Academy Award and nominated for an Emmy.Her cross-platform project The Defector film and interactive won Best Documentary, Best Documentary Director and the Diversity Award at the Canadian Screen Awards. The Defector Interactive won the FITC Award, the Canadian Digi Award, and at the SXSW Interactive Festival. Her directorial credits include: Artificial Immortality, The Superfood Chain, Smart Drugs, The Four Seasons Mosaic (CBC), Gemini nominee for Best Performance Doc; and Columbus International Film and Video Festival Award‐winning The Roswell Incident, Western Eyes, and Almost Real: Connecting in a Wired World.Image Copyright and Credit: Ann Shin and Fathom Film Group.F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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