Claim Ownership

Author:

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

 Episodes
Reverse
This episode features:0:46 - 2:32 – Andrew Forbes2:34 - 2:50 – Greg Jeffs, William F. White2:53 - 3:18 – Mandi Taylor, RBC3:20 - 3:52 – Christa Dickenson, Telefilm Canada3:54 - 4:11 – Adam Kirkham, Hot Docs4:14 - 4:43 – Heather Hawthorn Doyle4:46 - 5:05 - Carissa McCart, TELUS and National Screen Institute board of directors5:07 - 5:27 – Kenny Boyce, City of Winnipeg5:30 - 5:58 – Tim Southam6:01 - 7:01 – Marlene Kendall, National Screen Institute board of directors7:04 - 7:16 – Lisa Ducharme, APTN7:19 - 7:37 – Monique Perro, IATSE Local 8567:40 - 8:07 – Erin Creasey, Ontario Creates8:10 - 9:18 – Dan Bekerman, Scythia Films9:21 - 10:15 – Camilla MacEachern, Northwest Territories Film Commission10:18 - 10:54 – Shane Smith, Hot Docs
This episode features:0:46 - 1:15 – Kerry Ryan, The Winnipeg Foundation1:17 - 2:41 – Chris Vajcner, National Screen Institute2:44 - 3:04 – Adam Smoluk, Film Training Manitoba3:06 - 3:36 – Dahlia Thompson, CBC3:39 - 4:06 – Ursula Lawson, National Screen Institute4:09 - 4:26 – Steven Foster, Directors Guild of Canada4:29 - 4:50 – Esther Viragh, National Film Board of Canada4:53 - 5:17 – Trish Dolman, Screen Siren Pictures5:20 - 5:49 – Liz Janzen5:51 - 6:15 – Jackie Wild, TELUS6:17 - 6:40 – Avi Federgreen6:42 - 8:33 – Annelise Larson, Storypreneurs Unite8:35 - 8:54 – Marileen Bartlett, Centre for Aboriginal Human Resource Development (CAHRD)8:56 - 9:29 – Maxine Quigley9:31 - 9:48 – Maureen Judge9:50 - 10:26 – Michael Levine, National Screen Institute board of directors10:28 - 11:52 – Jennifer Holness, Hungry Eyes Media
This episode features:1:54 - 2:23 – Nicole Matiation2:24 - 3:19 – Jeff Newman, Nüman Films3:22 - 3:48 – Nicole Ungurian and Bill Crossman, Guppy Design3:51 - 4:11 – Julie Hackett, National Screen Institute4:14 - 4:24 – Alexandra Zarowny4:26 - 5:16 – Brad Pelman, National Screen Institute board of directors5:18 - 5:50 – Naomi Johnson, imagineNATIVE5:52 - 6:09 – Adam Garnet Jones, APTN6:12 - 6:33 – Heather Daughtry, Final Draft Screenwriting6:35 - 8:10 – John Bertrand, CBC8:12 - 8:42 – John Nues, National Screen Institute8:44 - 9:22 – Joan Jenkinson, Black Screen Office9:24 - 9:41 – Jessica Gibson, National Screen Institute9:44 - 11:10 – Jennifer Podemski, The Shine Network11:12 - 11:55 – Iris Merritt, Yukon Media Development11:57 - 13:46 – Sarah Simpson Yellowquill, National Screen Institute13:59 - 14:41 – Dave Barber, Winnipeg Film Group
Nadine Arpin

Nadine Arpin

2021-12-0820:49

“It’s taken me a long time to feel really comfortable in my skin. I feel like I’ve finally come into my own.”Wiiya's current project, Eve Zaremba’s Dyke Detective, follows the origin story of the 1978 graphic novel character Helen Keremos, an Indigenous lesbian detective. Nadine reveals their personal connection to the character, as they describe their grief surrounding the loss of a friend - an Indigenous woman in Sioux Lookout whose death went unsolved.Nadine is a graduate of the NSI IndigiDocs program.Wiiya: Michef pronoun, they/them Trigger warning: This episode contains discussions surrounding trauma and violence against Indigenous women.
Joy Loewen

Joy Loewen

2021-11-3032:56

“I do have a belief that we can bring people together through story. And how we support those storytellers is critical - that’s the essence of what we do at the National Screen Institute.”Leader, advocate, mother and friend are just a few of the many hats worn by National Screen Institute CEO Joy Loewen.  In this episode, Joy discusses the path that led her to her current role as CEO. From growing up in Steinbach, Manitoba, to building her career in the media industry, to becoming a mother - Joy explains not only what she does but, more importantly, why she does it. Joy has worked with the National Screen Institute for 10 years, serving in many different roles until her appointment as CEO in January 2020. Since then, Joy has launched multiple new programs to address the needs of storytellers, created a strategic plan for the organization and navigated the challenges of working through a global pandemic.
Cheyenne Bruneau

Cheyenne Bruneau

2021-11-2322:12

“Art can impact people on such a soul level - and you’re complete strangers. It’s incredible that way.” Cheyenne Bruneau, also known as Miss Rae in the band Miss Rae & The Midnight Ramblers, wrote her first song Last Time when she was 19. She explains the meaning behind the song, and its power to transcend her own narrative and become something that her audiences can relate to.Cheyenne joined the National Screen Institute team in 2021 as program manager for NSI Art of Business Management - Indigenous Edition. Cheyenne is also co-program manager of the inaugural TikTok Accelerator for Indigenous Creators.Cheyenne is an alumna of the CBC New Indigenous Voices program. Trigger warning: This episode contains discussions around domestic violence.Music provided by Blue Dot Sessions and Miss Rae & The Midnight Ramblers.
Josh Epstein

Josh Epstein

2021-11-1620:32

“I think everyone has at least one story that they can tell better than anyone else.”Josh co-wrote and produced the feature, Adventures in Public School, in 2014 through the NSI Features First program along with fellow grad Kyle Rideout. Josh walks us through their process, from researching the characters to premiering the film at the Toronto International Film Festival.Josh will work with National Screen Institute participants as a producer facilitator in the new program, NSI Series Incubator.Josh is an alumnus of NSI Drama Prize, NSI Features First and NSI Totally Television.Music provided by Blue Dot Sessions.
Darcy Waite

Darcy Waite

2021-11-0923:55

“Find what drives you, once you find that – it doesn’t matter if it gets hard. It’s always fun.”Darcy's feature film, Ruthless Souls - produced through the Telefilm Talent to Watch program - premiered at imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in 2019 and was part of Telefilm’s Canadian Perspectives Program in Berlinale in 2020.Darcy is an alumnus of CBC New Indigenous Voices, NSI IndigiDocs and NSI Art of Business Management – Indigenous Edition. Music provided by Blue Dot Sessions.
Karen Lam

Karen Lam

2021-11-0222:17

“In writing, I think I’m a lot more conscious of my own responsibility.”For over two decades, Karen has written, produced and directed a multitude of acclaimed feature and short film projects, including: Stained (2010), Evangeline (2013) and a short film tribute to Sandra Oh entitled Sandra Oh: Inspiration (2019).Her recent feature, The Curse of Willow Song, won the Leo Award for best direction and the Best BC Film award at Vancouver International Film Festival.Karen shares her expertise with National Screen Institute participants as a mentor for TELUS STORYHIVE and director advisor for NSI Series Incubator.  Karen is a graduate of NSI Drama Prize and NSI Totally Television. Music provided by Blue Dot Sessions.
Ian Bawa

Ian Bawa

2021-10-2924:14

“There’s something very important about using art to be vulnerable”Ian's short film Strong Son - which stars his late father - gained attention at festivals across the country, including the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF). The short was optioned by Farpoint Films earlier this year and is set to begin production as a feature film in 2022.This year, Ian was selected for Reelworld’s Emerging 20 initiative and TIFF’s Talent Development Filmmaker Lab.Ian is a graduate of the NSI Totally Television and NSI Business for Producers programs. Trigger Warning: This episode contains discussions about grief and includes strong language.Music provided by Blue Dot Sessions.
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store