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Indigenae Podcast

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Indigenae is a community-guided podcast that celebrates Indigenous womxn's health and wellbeing, brought to you by the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health. Join hosts Sarah Stern (Cherokee Nation), Olivia Trujillo (Navajo Nation), Dr. Sophie Neuner Weinstein (Karuk Tribe), and their guests on a journey through Indigenous womanhood.
25 Episodes
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On the final episode of Indigenae, cultural practitioners Kathy McCovey and Lisa Hillman teach us about Indigenous stewardship and the sacred connection between land and our physical, spiritual, and mental wellbeing. Kathy McCovey, is a fourth-generation forester, archeologist, and Cultural Resource Specialist. She has dedicated her life to revitalizing traditional land management practices in the Karuk homelands, what is now known as Northern California.Lisa Hillman is a renowned Karuk ...
Cari Herthel, Vice Chair of the Esselen Tribe, reckons with the complex and intergenerational trauma caused by human trafficking. As a survivor, Cari offers personal reflection, deep truths, and authenticity to connect with others and raise awareness for protecting our relatives; By experiencing and continuing ancestral practices —“I now know that it is a connection to my culture, it is a connection to my value, that allows me to regulate my unhealed trauma.”Cari is a member of the Esselen an...
On Episode 20 of Indigenae, hosts Olivia Trujillo (Navajo), Sarah Stern (Cherokee), and Dr. Sophie Neuner (Karuk) share how this collection of stories came into being, what inspired the project, and lessons learned along the way.About Indigenae: https://caih.jhu.edu/programs/indigenae-podcastCheck out some of the podcasts that inspire us:This Land: https://crooked.com/podcast-series/this-land/All My Relations: https://www.allmyrelationspodcast.com/Well For Culture: https://www.wellforculture....
Birdie Lyons, Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe, was seven years old when she was taken away from her family. Not long after, she escaped from boarding school to return to her community and grow up immersed in Ojibwe culture. During the ceremonies to mark her First and Final Moons, Birdie received assignments and teachings that have guided her on her path to becoming a cultural practitioner, a matriarch, and a community leader. In this episode of Indigenae, Birdie shares teachings she learned through...
In part two of our series on Two-Spirit wellbeing, we continue our conversation with Souksavanh T. Keovorabouth, who is a Diné and Laotian PhD student in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Oregon State University. We dive into a discussion about Two-Spirit Autonomy, and sex and pleasure outside hetero norms. Souksavanh shares how experiencing pleasure can be an expression of sovereignty.Souksavanh T. Keovorabouth, Diné/Laotian (they, them, theirs) is a Ph.D. student at Oregon State Univer...
On this of Indigenae, we move beyond gender binaries to explore the topics of Two Spirit identity, the sacredness of fluidity, and restoring balance. Joining us is Souksavanh T. Keovorabouth, a Diné and Laotian PhD student at Oregon State University, where they study Two-Spirit wellbeing, Native and Queer urbanization, BIPOC Masculinities, and MMIWG2S. “We can live in a limitless world”, believes Souksavanh - outside the confines of settler colonialism. Souksavanh T. Keovorabouth, Diné/L...
Navajo Elder Phyllis Smith is an educator, breast cancer survivor, and patient advocate. Phyllis explains how her medical team, family support, and healthy dose humor helped her heal from cancer. “To see me here tells you that cancer, you can beat it. There’s all different ways, it depends on yourself. You’ve got to be determined, you’ve got to set yourself forward, you’ve got to plan ahead. [...] there’s always somebody out there, nowadays, who can help you”. She is joined by her son Tyson K...
Dr. Jenny Richards, an Assistant Scientist at the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, shares how Indigenous strengths-based research counters harmful narratives around coming of age, menstruation, and toxic masculinity. “Reinforcing how much social support we have in our culture, in our ceremonies, in the way we raise our children [...] is protective in and of itself”. Jennifer Richards, PhD, MPH (Diné/Lakota/Taos) is an Assistant Scientist with the Johns Hopkins Center for Ameri...
Taos Pueblo Doula Aspen Mirabal joins us for a conversation about birth equity, decolonizing birthing spaces, and supporting our birthing relatives. She shares her journey in birth work and talks about the unique role of doulas in re-matriating cultural traditions and ancestral birthing practices.Aspen Mirabal is the eldest of three daughters from Taos Pueblo. Aspen currently resides in Taos, but spends most of her days on the Pueblo. Professionally, Aspen is a trained and certified birth kee...
Dr. Amanda Bruegl, a member of the Stockbridge and Oneida Nations, shares why cancer screening and cancer prevention are so important for our Native peoples, and how providers can be more sensitive to our unique cultural needs. She explains how to advocate for yourself and your body during visits with a health provider: “Bring a friend, bring your auntie, bring someone to a visit. If you need someone to hold your hand, that’s ok.”Amanda Bruegl, MD, MS, Oneida/Stockbridge-Munsee Nations, is th...
Karla Decker-Sorby, a Public Health Nurse and Dakota Elder, shares important lessons about living in a good way, paying respect to our Elders, and building reciprocal relations with our communities. “With menopause”, Karla explains, came “the best years of my life”; she learned to fully embrace who she is, and give her best with the gifts she was given. Karla Decker-Sorby is a member of the Sisseton Oyate Dakota Nation. Karla has worked in tribal health spaces since the age of 19. In 201...
Delilah Robb (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians) talks about her work as a community health educator. She explains why community-driven health promotion is at the center of healing, and how traditional stories teach us to honor our bodies and sexuality.Delilah Robb is pursuing her Masters of Public Health in the Maternal and Child Health program at the University of Minnesota. She is an enrolled member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians. In addition to her studies, she wor...
Mary Kathryn Nagle (Citizen of the Cherokee Nation) answers questions about the legal framework around the epidemic of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirit. She explains how a 1978 Supreme Court decision failed to protect Native people from violence perpetrated by non-Natives, and what has happened since to restore Tribes’ rights to prosecute crimes committed on tribal land. Mary Kathryn joined Pipestem & Nagle, P.C. in 2015 from Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & S...
Tara Maudrie ​(MSPH​), a Sault Ste. Marie Ojibwe PhD student at the Johns Hopkins ​​​​​​​Bloomberg School of Public Health, discusses food sovereignty in an Urban Native context. She points out that our relationship with food consists of more than the things we eat and encompasses our relationships to land, water, air, and all living beings. Tara reminds us that “traditional foods will always find you,” and that no matter where we are we can connect with our place-based eating values.Tara Mau...
Traditional healing methods and teachings are at the center of Indigenous wellbeing. They can support Indigenous people diagnosed with cancer. Linda shares her story of being both a traditional practitioner and overcoming a cancer diagnosis. She knows the manner in which difficult news such as a cancer diagnosis is delivered matters, and reminds us to use approaches congruent with Indigenous lifeways. Linda Ross (Diné) is a traditional healer living in Window Rock, AZ. Linda is a survivo...
Ashley Phelps-Garcia teaches us about the importance and joy of living in ceremony and community. During the boarding school era, many of our relatives were made to feel ashamed of who they were as Native people. Indigenous practices and ways of knowing were banned. Today, we are proud to be Indigenous. Our ceremonies allow us to heal and grow individually and collectively, for the seven generations ahead. Ashley reminds us of the importance of learning from our Elders, and of holding good th...
Dr. Jules Koostachin reminds us that stories about our bodies are alive and carry agency, especially during times of change. These transitions are individual experiences, and call us to be present in our bodies. Jules allows us to dig deeper into the question, “When signs of menopause begin, how do we find support from our communities?” Dr. Jules Arita Koostachin is Cree and a band member of Attawapiskat First Nation. She was raised by her Cree grandparents in Moosonee, as well as her mother,...
Sexual wellbeing is a holistic practice of bodily autonomy. Gabrielle Evans reminds us that pleasure, communication, and sex outside of a binary are all important parts of Indigenous health. She also emphasizes the vital role of sex educators to decrease stigma and further conversations about healthy relationships.Gabrielle S. Evans, MPH, CHES, Member of the Haliwa-Saponi Tribe, has taught comprehensive sexuality education for over four years. She is the Co-Founder of the Minority Sex Report....
Indigenous women, girls, and Two-Spirit have faced unfathomable violence since the arrival of settler colonialism. Dr. Blythe George, a Member of the Yurok Tribe, is here to unpack the ongoing epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women and talk about its causes while centering survivorship, resilience, and healing. Professor Blythe K. George is from McKinleyville, CA, and is a member of the Yurok Tribe. She previously served as a Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow in Sociology at UC...
Dr. Nicole Redvers creates a bridge between Indigenous and Western ways of thinking about health. Dr. Redvers reminds us that land-based practices are essential to our health wherever we are living: “By going on our healing journey, we’re automatically in healing with the land itself because we are in and of itself land.” Dr. Nicole Redvers, ND, MPH, (she/hers) is an enrolled member of the Deninu K’ue First Nation from sub-Arctic Canada. She is currently an assistant professor in the Departme...
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