Claim Ownership

Author:

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

 Episodes
Reverse
To celebrate the 100th birthday of the iconic Heritage Hall building, a dynamic and intriguing eight-episode audio series called, If These Halls Could Talk, was created. Listen as historians, your fellow alumni and friends of SAIT discuss the creation of the castle on the hill, its vital role in Canadian military history, and how careers were launched from within its walls.Listen to the series all at once or at your own pace starting Thursday, March 17, 2022. 
To celebrate the 100th birthday of the iconic Heritage Hall building, a dynamic and intriguing eight-episode audio series called, If These Halls Could Talk, was created. Listen as historians, your fellow alumni and friends of SAIT discuss the creation of the castle on the hill, its vital role in Canadian military history, and how careers were launched from within its walls.Listen to the series all at once or at your own pace starting Thursday, March 17, 2022. 
SAIT’s roots are as old as the famous Calgary/Edmonton rivalry. After Alberta became a province in 1905, its newly formed government gave Edmonton both the provincial legislature building and the province’s first university. After determined campaigning by Calgarians, the city was awarded the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art (PITA, as SAIT was formerly known) in 1916 . In this episode, Calgary historian and author David Finch and the CEO of Heritage Calgary, Josh Traptow (AIM ’11), illustrate the city’s physical and economic landscape in the early 1900s and trace how, in 1922, PITA moved from its original location in Inglewood to its permanent home — the stately brick building PITA shared with the Calgary Normal School. Explore how, together, the two institutes would sit regally at the crest of Calgary’s North Hill for decades, and investigate the opportunities the brand new “castle on the hill” symbolized for students, the city and the province.Writing, production, sound design, vocals and composition by Ron Tarrant.Research and writing by Astrid Gagnier, Alyssa Athanasopoulos and Kris Ferguson.
The future looked incredibly bright for Calgary in the early 1920s, and the construction of a majestic new home for the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art (PITA) was a testament to that. Taking shape high above the bustling city, and built in the Collegiate Gothic style, the school’s castle-like qualities were unlike anything anyone had seen in these parts before.A century later, Heritage Hall remains a crown jewel on the crest of the North Hill. Join Heritage Calgary CEO, Josh Traptow (AIM ’11), and Calgary historian and author David Finch as they sculpt out details of the structure, explore the inspiration behind its architectural origins and reflect on what it meant to Calgarians 100 years ago.Writing, production, sound design, vocals and composition by Ron Tarrant.Research and writing by Astrid Gagnier, Alyssa Athanasopoulos and Kris Ferguson.
In less than one week at the start of the Second World War, the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art (PITA, as SAIT was known then) moved all of its students to temporary classrooms throughout the city. Why? So that the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan could open its No. 2 Wireless School in PITA’s Main Building. Now known as Heritage Hall, the building welcomed thousands of air force pilots and crew members from Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Learn more about the Wireless School, discover what it takes to learn Morse code and experience the key role that skill played during battle. Meet the Wireless School’s celebrity mascot and discover how returning veterans shaped PITA after the war.  Writing, production, sound design, vocals and composition by Ron Tarrant.Research and writing by Astrid Gagnier, Alyssa Athanasopoulos and Kris Ferguson.Voice actors: Ron Tarrant Sr., Helena Gagnier and Kris Ferguson.
After the Second World War, the Calgary Normal School (a training school for primary and secondary school teachers) returned to the west wing of Heritage Hall as the Calgary Branch of the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Education University Demonstration School (UDS). Until 1955, youngsters from all around the area came to elementary school in the grand building, where they would not only learn lessons in mathematics, English and science, but also what happens when you stick your tongue on a freezing cold door handle.  Listen as three UDS alumni who have been friends for more than 70 years — Murray Cameron, Ruth Hindle (Ironside) and Brock Smith — recount childhood memories from their days at UDS. Writing, production, sound design, vocals and composition by Ron Tarrant.Research and writing by Astrid Gagnier, Alyssa Athanasopoulos and Kris Ferguson.
Calgary’s first public art project was by students from the Art Department of the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art (PITA, as SAIT was known at the time). Their murals can still be seen and admired on the walls of Heritage Hall today. The ambitious program was created by the head of the department, Illingworth “Buck” Kerr, in 1949 and included works by nearly a dozen students including Gertrude Hudson, Ron (Gyo-Zo) Spickett, Roy Kiyooka and Ted Godwin. Discover the vital role PITA’s Art Department played in developing the arts in Calgary, and hear how Heritage Hall became a canvas, a gallery and a platform for many artists in the early days of their careers. Listen as art historian Lisa Christensen sets the Heritage Hall murals in historical context, and as renowned Canadian sculptor Katie Ohe (Art ‘58) shares memories of the lifelong impact studying at PITA has had on her art. Writing, production, sound design, vocals and composition by Ron Tarrant.Research and writing by Astrid Gagnier, Alyssa Athanasopoulos and Kris Ferguson.
1922 marked not only the opening of Heritage Hall, but also the creation of the Students’ Association (today’s Saitsa) which was originally housed within that building. It began as an initiative to bring some levity to student life outside the workshops and classrooms by offering social, literary and athletic activities. Still going strong 100 years later, Saitsa has accomplished that and so much more for the many thousands of students it represents. From lobbying government to student support and campus events, former Saitsa presidents Brigitte Matheson (BA ‘15) and Andre Mamprin (BA ‘89) reflect on the frolics and achievements during their time in office. Writing, production, sound design, vocals and composition by Ron Tarrant.Research and writing by Astrid Gagnier, Alyssa Athanasopoulos and Kris Ferguson.
Heritage Hall has been at the heart of SAIT’s campus since 1922 — in fact, it was called the Main Building for six decades. It’s hard to imagine the void there would be without it — but in the 1980s, there was serious talk of tearing it down. In this episode, explore how this central gathering place for countless students, administrators and teachers became both a provincial and a national historic site — and living proof that some things are worth preserving.Join architect Alan Gardner, Power Engineering instructor Jim Ireland and former associate dean for the MacPhail School of Energy Dan Violini as they reminisce about modernizing Heritage Hall and trace its transformation over recent years.Writing, production, sound design, vocals and composition by Ron Tarrant.Research and writing by Astrid Gagnier, Alyssa Athanasopoulos and Kris Ferguson.
Heritage Hall is one of the most identifiable buildings in Calgary — and the embodiment of SAIT’s history as a global leader in applied education. This episode explores the vital role volunteering, generosity and giving back have played in establishing Calgary as a world-class city, and in elevating SAIT as an institution. From the excitement of the 1988 Winter Olympics to corporate gifts to serving on the SAIT Board of Governors, philanthropy has transformed SAIT in countless ways.Join Brian Bowman, Director of Alumni and Development at SAIT, and Larry Macdonald, a strong supporter who has served SAIT in many ways (including as Chair of the Board of Governors) and who received an honorary SAIT Bachelor of Technology degree in 2006, as they discuss the ways philanthropy nurtures great cities, the excitement of restoring Heritage Hall during the 1980s and how giving back enables students to succeed today and in the future.  Writing, production, sound design, vocals and composition by Ron Tarrant.Research and writing by Astrid Gagnier, Alyssa Athanasopoulos and Kris Ferguson.
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store