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Oxide and Friends

Author: Oxide Computer Company

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Oxide hosts a weekly Discord show where we discuss a wide range of topics: computer history, startups, Oxide hardware bringup, and other topics du jour. These are the recordings in podcast form.
Join us live (usually Mondays at 5pm PT) https://discord.gg/gcQxNHAKCB
Subscribe to our calendar: https://sesh.fyi/api/calendar/v2/iMdFbuFRupMwuTiwvXswNU.ics
80 Episodes
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Open Source Governance

Open Source Governance

2023-05-3001:25:451

Bryan and Adam are joined by Ashley Williams to talk about open source governance... and the recently, and various stumblings of the Rust project leadership.
Bryan and Adam are joined by Jonathan and Jignesh from Samtec to discuss working together to build the Oxide Rack. We've all seen bad vendors--what does it mean to be a great partner? Also: silicon photonics are (still!) just 18 months away!
Bryan and Adam are joined by Oxide colleagues Arjen, Matt, John, and Nathaneal to talk about the management network--the brainstem of the Oxide Rack. Just as it ties together so many components, this episode ties together many many (many!) topics we've discussed in other episodes.We've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from May 8th 2023.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, we were joined by Oxide colleagues Arjen Roodselaar, Matt Keeter, John Gallagher, and Nathanael Huffman.This built on work described in many previous episodes: Cabling the Backplane Prior to going all-in on a cabled backplane with blind-mated server sleds (i.e. no plugging, unplugging, mis-plugging network cables). We (Bryan) espoused an "NC-SI or bust" mantra... at least in part to avoid doubling the cable count. With the cabled backplane, the reasons for NC-SI disappeared (which let the many reasons against truly shine). The Pragmatism of Hubris in which we talk about our embedded operating system, Hubris (and it's companion debugger, Humility). Hubris runs on the service processors that are the main endpoints on the management network. Matt's work controlling the management network switch (the VSC7448) is in the context of Hubris, as is John's work communicating with the sleds over the management network. The Power of Proto Boards showed and told about the many small boards we've used in development. Several of those were purpose built for controlling and simulating parts of the management network. The Oxide Supply Chain Kate Hicks joined us to talk about the challenges of navigating the supply chain. Mentioned here in the context of "supply-chain-driven design": we designed around the parts we could procure! Tip: stay away from "automotive-quality" parts when the auto industry is soaking them all up. Holistic Boot in which we talked about how (uniquely!) Oxide boots from nothing to its operating system and services. Over the management network, we can drive server recovery by piping in a RAMdisk over the network and then (slowly) through the UART to the CPU. Get You a State Machine for Great Good Andrew joined us to talk about his work on a state-machine driven text-UI and its companion replay debugger. We mentioned this in the context of John replaying the long upload process in seconds rather than hours to fix a UI bug. Major components of the management networkMatt's VSC7448 dev kitMatt's remote tuning setup via webcamManagement network debuggingManagement network debugging
Erin Kissane joins Bryan and Adam to talk the new social network "Bluesky" through the lens of her blog post "Blue Skies Over Mastodon". Long-time friends of Oxide and social-media aficionados Time Bray and Steve Klabnik also helped shed light on technical and social aspects of the net network.Blue Skies Over Mastodon (with Erin Kissane and Tim Bray)We've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from May 1st, 2023.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, we were joined by special guest Erin Kissane and long-time acquaintances of the show Tim Bray and Steve Klabnik.Some of the topics we hit on, in the order that we hit them: Erin's blog post Blue Skies Over Mastodon Mastodon blog (5/1) A new onboarding experience on Mastodon] Tim's blog post from November Bye Twitter "Buy the rumor, sell the news" Hellthread "Skeet" is to "Tweet" is to "Toot" (aka "Publish") skyline.gay Bluesky blog Composable Moderation Lobsters Phanpy So you've been publically shamed by Jon Ronson If we got something wrong or missed something, please file a PR! Our next show will likely be on Monday at 5p Pacific Time on our Discord server; stay tuned to our Mastodon feeds for details, or subscribe to this calendar. We'd love to have you join us, as we always love to hear from new speakers!
The Rust Foundation caused a fracas with their proposed new trademark rules. Bryan and Adam were lucky enough to be joined by Ashley Williams, Adam Jacob, and Steve Klabnik for an insightful discussion of open source governance and communities--in particular as applied to Rust.Rust Trademark: Argle-bargle or Foofaraw?We've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from April 17th, 2023.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, we were joined by Ashley Williams, Adam Jacob, and Steve Klabnik.Some of the topics we hit on, in the order that we hit them: Succession The Simpsons (explaining the title of this episode) The Wire The Wire at 20 Podcast The Register: Rust Foundation Apologizes for Trademark Policy Jomboy (our aspiration) Ice Weasel Pamela Chestek Bryan's talk from Node Summit 2017: Platform as a Reflection of Values Linux Foundation form 990 Rust Foundation Board Rust Foundation participation rules If we got something wrong or missed something, please file a PR! Our next show will likely be on Monday at 5p Pacific Time on our Discord server; stay tuned to our Mastodon feeds for details, or subscribe to this calendar. We'd love to have you join us, as we always love to hear from new speakers!
Cabling the Backplane

Cabling the Backplane

2023-04-0401:00:30

Bryan and Adam are joined by Doug Wibben and Robert Keith to talk about the mechanical design of the cabled backplane of the Oxide rack that allows for "blind-mated" server sleds--no network and power cables to plug, unplug, and mis-plug! Watch the chapter art for relevant pictures.We've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from April 3rd, 2023.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, we were joined by Oxide colleague, Robert Keith, and special guest, Doug Wibben.00:00 03:02 09:52 11:09 12:16 12:58 18:58 25:11 27:07 29:58 32:11 37:11 42:56 44:01 50:01 54:51 (00:00) - (03:02) - (09:52) - (11:09) - (12:16) - (12:58) - (18:58) - (25:11) - (27:07) - (29:58) - (32:11) - (37:11) - (42:56) - (44:01) - (50:01) - (54:51) - If we got something wrong or missed something, please file a PR! Our next show will likely be on Monday at 5p Pacific Time on our Discord server; stay tuned to our Mastodon feeds for details, or subscribe to this calendar. We'd love to have you join us, as we always love to hear from new speakers!
Andrew Stone of Oxide Engineering joined Bryan, Adam, and the Oxide Friends to talk about his purpose-built, replay debugger for the Oxide setup textual UI. Andrew borrowed a technique from his extensive work with distributed systems to built a UI that was well-structured... and highly amenable to debuggability. He built a custom debugger "in a weekend"!Some of the topics we hit on, in the order that we hit them: tui-rs Crossterm The reedline crate Episode about the "Sidecar" switch Elm time-travel debugging Replay.io Devtools.fm episode on Replay.io AADEBUG conference California horse meat law The (lightly) edited live chat from the show: MattCampbell: I'm gathering that this is more like the fancy pseudo-GUI style of TUI, which is possibly bad for accessibility ahl: we are also building with accessibility in mind, stripping away some of the non-textual elements optionally MattCampbell: oh, cool ahl: Episode about the "Sidecar" switch: https://github.com/oxidecomputer/oxide-and-friends/blob/master/2021_11_29.md MattCampbell: ooh! That kind of recording is definitely better for accessibility than a video. uwaces: Were you inspired by Elm? (The programming language for web browsers?) bcantrill: Here's Andrew's PR for this, FWIW: oxidecomputer/omicron#2682 uwaces: Elm has a very similar model. They have even had a debugger that let you run events in reverse: https://elm-lang.org/news/time-travel-made-easy bch: I’m joining late - 1) does this state-machine replay model have a name 2) expand on (describe ) the I/o logic separation distinction? ahl: http://dtrace.org/blogs/ahl/2015/06/22/first-rust-program-pain/ zk: RE: logic separation in consensus protocols: the benefit of seperating out the state machine into a side-effect free function allows you to write a formally verified implementation in a pure FP lang or theorem prover, and then extract a reference program from the proof. we're going to the zoo: lol i’m a web dev && we do UI tests via StorybookJS + snapshots of each story + snapshots of the end state of an interaction ig: At that point you could turn the recording into an “expect test”. https://blog.janestreet.com/the-joy-of-expect-tests/ we're going to the zoo: TOFU but for tests 🥰 uwaces: Are you at all worried that you are replicating the horror that is the IBM 3270 terminal? — I have personal history programming on z/OS where the only interface is a graphical EBCDIC 3027 interface — the horror is that people write programs to interact with graphical window (assuming a certain size). ahl: https://docs.rs/serde/latest/serde/#data-formats ahl: SHOW NOTES Bryan as "semi-elderly" engineer MattCampbell: didn't Bryan write a blog post on this? MattCampbell: http://dtrace.org/blogs/bmc/2008/11/16/on-modalities-and-misadventures/ uwaces: https://www.replay.io ahl: https://devtools.fm/episode/9 ahl: e.g. https://altsysrq.github.io/proptest-book/intro.html we're going to the zoo: https://github.com/AFLplusplus/LibAFL ig: Are you using proptest, quickcheck, or something else? nickik: This really started with Haskell https://hackage.haskell.org/package/QuickCheck Its also cool that it does 'narrowing' meaning it will try to find an error, and then try to generate a simpler error case. endigma: how different is something like this from what go calls "fuzzing" Riking: Fuzzing does also have a minimization step we're going to the zoo: https://github.com/dubzzz/fast-check Riking: Property-based testing tends to be structured differently in philosophy, while fuzzers are more aligned to "give you a bag of bytes" nickik: http://www.quviq.com/products/erlang-quickcheck/ endigma: yeah I can tell its a different structure, but the overall goal seems similar we're going to the zoo: they are nonexclusive approaches to testing papertigers: I think Kelly was doing a bunch of tests at Joyent based on quick check and prop test. First time I encountered it we're going to the zoo: libafl provides a #[derive(Arbitrary)] macro that will provide the correct values for a struct uwaces: Lots of stuff in Rust existed first in Haskell (build.rs, quote!, Derive macros, Traits, ect….)… nixinator: https://tenor.com/view/%C3%B3culos-escuro-exterminador-terminator-arnold-schwarzenegger-gif-14440790 we're going to the zoo: “what do these means” depends on who you ask lol we're going to the zoo: fast-check is 🔥 for TypeScript endigma: if the tested function is deterministic and the test is testing arbitrary input and testing against the result to be derivative in some way of the input function by some f(x), don't you end up re-implementing the tested function to provide the expected result? how does the author choose what properties of a system to test without falling into a "testing the test" pit? we're going to the zoo: Rust: “Here comes the Haskell plane!” nixinator: Isn’t rust == oxidation endigma: yes endigma: in a scientific sense nixinator: Iron oxide 🙂 lol nixinator: Very good! GeneralShaw: Is prop test a way of formal verification? Is it same/different? ahl: https://dl.acm.org/conference/aadebug ig: I mean, Haskell is an academic research language at it’s core. It naturally is going to try new things and try and push the envelope, that’s what many of the core developers use the language for. uwaces: Not all of the Haskell ideas are good :). Rusts thesis when it started was “let’s take the good boring ideas that are >20 years old and leave the exciting new ones out”. Haskell is all about the exciting new ideas that might be bad (Lenes, lazy evaluation, ect…) ig: Rust had Servo as it’s driving force in the early stages as well, so was choosing features that made implementing Servo easier. endigma: the parallel between haskell and elixir is interesting, elixir being "the other functional language" that exists in the sort of limelight nickik: Not really, formal verification proves that it satisfied some condition, property based testing basically just throws a bunch of stuff against your code and tries to break it. ElFurbe: "score some horse" ElFurbe: Outstanding nickik: In Switzerland at least horse meat is totally normal, just buy it in a standard boring store. rolypoly: Ballmer curve, but with horse, and for debugging. uwaces: On that topic Rust has some exciting usability developments for Bounded model checking: https://github.com/model-checking/kani — proving correctness of property tests. ig: Okay I tuned out for a minute and now I’m wondering if I’m having a fever dream. GeneralShaw: Oh that sounds like Constrained random tests, but somehow takes the properties as the constraints endigma: debugging -> stroke -> horse meat nickik: Good horse: https://www.migros.ch/de/product/mo/3851110 Nahum: The word he was looking for was probably "elder" ig: Event sourcing is also in that same CQRS family. ig: In terms of google able terms endigma: isn't cqrs command query separation ig: Event sourcing becomes harder when you need to do GDPR right to amend and right to be forgotten. uwaces: Yay for struct opt! ig: Thanks Andrew! Great episode. nickik: Datomic style databases allows you to have traditional-ish database but you can also subscribe to the event log. To comply with GDPR you can use 'Excision'. That will delete the data but it remember the transaction that did the removal. endigma: Datomic looks really interesting, never heard of this style of db before, sort of like the git db ig: Yeah, and if you didn’t build that in from the start you might end up needing an O(n) processing of the event log to excise. ajs: Kani looks super interesting ajs: I've had it on the backlog to play with for a while ig: Most DBs have a commit log, most don’t expose it externally. Event sourcing reimplements a lot of what’s in the commit log. nickik: Maybe more practical then full datomic, datascript (https://github.com/tonsky/datascript) is datomic in a browser. Good store for React applications to build on. nickik: Eventsourcing can scale to much larger size then you can handle with one Datomic style DB. But unless you really need it, its kind of a pain. endigma: is there anything preventing implementing it as a data structure ontop of a more conventional db? nickik: Datomic allows you to add arbitrary data to your transactional log, so for example you can attach to a transaction that it was done by user-x, threw api versions 2.2 and so on. That quite neat. nickik: That's exactly what datomic does, its designed to be read-scalable on big key value stores, but it works fine on SQL Databases! See: https://docs.datomic.com/on-prem/overview/storage.html endigma: oh thats pretty cool, i suppose the datom model would work well with hyperscale k/v endigma: from what i'm reading datoms are a sort of tuple though, k/v doesn't normally index by more than one k endigma: i wonder how batching lookups works to get the k/v of a particular entity endigma: or if they all just happen separately and its optimized for that endigma: Although I'm thinking like etcd uwaces: No. It just automates example creation. The same general framework can be used to do formal verification re:Kani and bounded model checking. Cyborus: ah, it seems i'm a bit late nickik: It does not use the K/V store directly. It puts large batches into one V. Then the have an external index that is a bunch of trees and the leafs are these batches of datoms. This has some information: https://tonsky.me/blog/unofficial-guide-to-datomic-internals/ or check out Rick Hickeys talks on YT. endigma: Sure, so more similar to the goal of fuzz tests than unit tests. we're going to the zoo: https://www.bjaress.com/posts/2021-07-03-fuzz-testing-vs-property-based-testing.html a reasonable approach will use both a naive and structured generative test we're going to the zoo: a fuzz test is just a property test that claims “for any possible input, the program should only output the types i expect / a known exception” end
Bryan and Adam and the Oxide Friends take on GPT and its implications for software engineering. Many aspiring programmers are concerned that the future of the profession is in jeopardy. Spoiler: the Oxide Friends see a bright future for human/GPT collaboration in software engineering.We've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from March 20th, 2023.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, speakers on MM DD included Josh Clulow, Keith Adams, Ashley Williams, and others. (Did we miss your name and/or get it wrong? Drop a PR!)Live chat from the show (lightly edited): ahl: John Carmack's tweet ahl: ...and the discussion Wizord: https://twitter.com/balajis/status/1636797265317867520 (the $1M bet on BTC, I take) dataphract: "prompt engineering" as in "social engineering" rather than "civil engineering" Grevian: I was surprised at how challenging getting good prompts could be, even if I wouldn't quite label it engineering TronDD: https://www.aiweirdness.com/search-or-fabrication/ MattCampbell: I tested ChatGPT in an area where I have domain expertise, and it got it very wrong. TronDD: Also interesting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPhJbKBuNnA Wizord: the question is, when will it be in competition with people? Wizord: copilot also can review code and find bugs if you ask it in a right way ag_dubs: i suspect that a new job will be building tools that help make training sets better and i strongly suspect that will be a programming job. ai will need tools and data and content and there's just a whole bunch of jobs to build tools for AI instead of people Wizord: re "reading manual and writing DTrace scripts" I think it's possible, if done with a large enough token window. Wizord: (there are already examples of GPT debugging code, although trivial ones) flaviusb: The chat here is really interesting to me, as it seems to miss the point of the thing. ChatGPT does not and can not ever 'actually work' - and whether it works is kind of irrelevant. Like, the Jaquard Looms and Numerical Control for machining did not 'work', but that didn't stop the roll out. Columbus: Maybe it has read the dtrace manual 😉 JustinAzoff: I work with a "long tail" language, and chatgpt sure is good at generating code that LOOKS like it might work, but is usually completely wrong clairegiordano: Some definite fans of DTrace on this show ag_dubs: a thing i want to chat about is how GPT can affect the "pace" of software development sudomateo: I also think it's a lot less than 100% of engineers that engage in code review. Wizord: yes, I've had some good experience with using copilot for code review ag_dubs: chatgpt is good at things that are already established... its not good at new things, or things that were just published Wizord: very few people I know use it for the purpose of comments/docs. just pure codegen/boilerplayes chadbrewbaker: "How would you write a process tree with dtrace?" (ChatGPT4) #!/usr/sbin/dtrace -s BEGIN { printf(""%5s %5s %5s %s\n"", ""PID"", ""PPID"", ""UID"", ""COMMAND""); } proc:::exec-success { printf(""%5d %5d %5d %s\n"", pid, ppid, uid, execname); } TronDD: That's interesting as expensive, specialized code analysis tools have been varying level of terrible for a long time JustinAzoff: I did an experiment before where I asked it to write me some php to insert a record into a database. so of course it generated code with sql injection chiefnoah: It's ability seems to scale with how many times someone has done the exact thing you're trying to do before JustinAzoff: but then I asked if sql injection was bad, which it explained that it was. then I asked if the code it wrote me was vulnerable to sql injection. it then explained it was Columbus: It misses empirical verification; forming a hypothesis, testing it, and learning from the result. There have been some attempts to implement this by feeding back e.g. command output into the prompt JustinAzoff: so then the crazy part, I asked if sql injection was bad, why did it give me code that was vulnerable to sql injection. It the went on to say that the first thing it gave me was just for example purposes JustinAzoff: so no wonder people get into "prompt engineering" since it's clear that you need to do things like ask for code that does something, and is secure, high performance, does not have buffer overflows or sql injection vulns MattCampbell: In my test case ("Write a Win32 UI Automation provider in C++"), all it did was produce plausible-sounding crap ag_dubs: pattern matching over very very large data sets clairegiordano: Bryan just said this and I wanted to write it down, re GPT-3: "the degree that it changes its answers when you tell GPT-3 to think like someone else" JustinAzoff: or even just, "do that, but better" ag_dubs: i think a lot of the awe of gpt is recognizing how simple our own strategies are instead of how complex the AI's strategy is chadbrewbaker: "How would Bryan Cantrill re-write this script?" (ChatGPT4) #!/usr/sbin/dtrace -s #pragma D option quiet dtrace:::BEGIN { printf(""%5s %5s %5s %s\n"", ""PID"", ""PPID"", ""UID"", ""COMMAND""); self->indent = 0; } sched:::off-cpu { self->indent = 0; } proc:::exec-success { this->curpid = pid; this->curppid = ppid; this->curuid = uid; this->indent = self->indent; } proc:::exec-success /execname != ""dtrace""/ { printf(""%*s"", this->indent * 2, """"); printf(""%5d %5d %5d %s\n"", this->curpid, this->curppid, this->curuid, execname); } proc:::exec-success, sched:::on-cpu /this->curpid == pid/ { self->indent++; } antranigv: that's pretty hit on! chiefnoah: Yup. Most people are not doing things that haven't been done before. A significant portion of software is just building blocks of libraries Wizord: intelligence is compression, in some sense. dataphract: "critique the epoll API as though you are Bryan Cantrill" ag_dubs: a brain would be much stranger!! Wizord: the ability to reduce a large dataset to a coherent set of rules antranigv: "Explain the issues of epoll, write as if it's a Bryan Cantrill talk" JustinAzoff: I was even thinking if there's any sort of parallel between the type of saying like "never write your own crypto" to "use well established libraries, don't reinvent the wheel" to "don't write any code at all, use the AI to help you" jbk: <@840382902163472385> futex syscall instead 🙂 Riking: the "attention heads" flaviusb: Like, it doesn't know anything, any more than a text file with googly eyes stuck to it 'knows' anything. Wizord: are you sure you want to make it self-aware as fast as possible? dataphract: I don't know that we as people are capable of recognizing the point in time at which ML models become capable of "knowing", if such a time comes Wizord: using AI to create more inequality is my #2 concern :\ flaviusb: There was a lot of hype when Rails was new and good code template generation tools were not commonly known around the lines of 'Rails is telepathic and a better programmer than you' - but it is a category error. Same with LLMs. chadbrewbaker: As you get larger contexts, the information theory becomes more and more interesting https://arxiv.org/abs/2303.09752 ag_dubs: this convo has taken a fanatic turn... flaviusb: And 'when will Rails become sentient' makes as much sense to ask as 'when will an LLM become sentient'. clairegiordano: Here is Simon Willison's blog post: https://simonwillison.net/2023/Feb/15/bing/ ahl: https://www.nytimes.com/2023/02/16/technology/bing-chatbot-microsoft-chatgpt.html dataphract: tsundere bing AI assistant ag_dubs: kevin roose also asked it for its shadow self... ag_dubs: it's not like it came outta nowhere 🤷 TronDD: https://www.smbc-comics.com/comic/algo ag_dubs: i am more worried about the people who believe chatgpt is "thinking" then whether it really is ag_dubs: like the worry is when people believe it is intelligent Riking: Feels like it's pulling from the grand synthesis of romance novels Wizord: the mere fact it gets this close is great. as limited as it is now. perplexes: Your prompts locate you in 50,000 dimensional probability space, so, like your “for you” page on TikTok, it tells you wayyy more about the prompter than the model Columbus: It’s a child prodigy that’s always on the verge of insanity. ag_dubs: think about it like a tool!!! ahl: https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/06/google-lamda-chatbot-sentient-ai/661322/ Columbus: I think about it like a grad student. perplexes: I’m curious about microsoft 365’s copilot ai grounding system and how well it works ag_dubs: i think the most important thing will be ownership of training data. i think people will be less mesmerized when we make it easier for folks to create specialized models for their own content ag_dubs: think about.. what is SEO in a chatgpt world- it's that training data dataphract: this already happened with Replika, right? flaviusb: Also when we make 'small ai' more possible so that you don't have as much centralisation and gatekeeping. Wizord: re: "how do we make it more of a tool?" this is an open question, and there's a tradeoff between how much of a "tool" AI is going to be and how autonomous it will be. also, at some point of "intelligence", a "mind" will "understand" that having more power will get you your goal faster. ag_dubs: we need to empower more folks to build specialized/authoritative training data sets that can be deployed in a more timely fashion perplexes: The alpaca.cpp direction is exciting, bringing models down to laptop size flaviusb: I think of it as 'how phenomenologically transparent' it will a) seem to be and b) actually be., antranigv: Me: What if I do `echo message | wall user` ? GPT: If you run the command echo message | wall user, it will write the message ""message"" to the standard input of the wall command, which will then broadcast the
Eric Vishria of Benchmark and Oxide CEO, Steve Tuck, join Bryan and Adam to talk about Silicon Valley Bank, its role in the startup ecosystem, and the short- and long-term effects of its collapse.We've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from March 17th, 2023.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, we were joined special guests Eric Vishria and Steve Tuck.(Did we miss your name and/or get it wrong? Drop a PR!)Curated chat log from the show: davidf: Sharing this here because I loved every bit of it: My Startup Banking Story by Mitchell Hashimoto ewen: 'The teller looks at the paper, then looks at me, then looks back at the paper, then asks ""Are you the HashiCorp guy?"" ' 😮 (Definitely agree that post looks relevant, and is worth reading; thanks for sharing. There's quite the impedance mismatch between ""traditional banking"" and ""startup"" approaches to things. Which I suspect in part explains how SVB was so widely used by startups.)" antranigv: Question: Are there any reasons why the US is behind in these banking things? all countries in the EU and developing countries have solved these problems decade(s) ago. statuscalamitous: my personal, barely informed take: we built this infra earlier, so we have more legacy a172: It sounds like what SVB was providing that was so rare was a kind of business as a service. statuscalamitous: my favorite "scare a developer" story: the way ACH payments work. that's right, SFTP! antranigv: I think you mean FTPS? did they move to SFTP? 😄 drkamoz: I think the opposite is also true, without the infra, Africa’s been very early to adopt mobile banking https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20131217-east-africa-a-mobile-banking-hub drkamoz: Can you explain sweep funds? Eric Likness - carpetbomberz.com: 6 months of runway some place else. Not what Peter Thiel was telling people. antranigv: What was his response? arjenroodselaar: Eject! Eject! ahl: this was a fun summary: https://svbhallofshame.wordpress.com/ ahl: https://www.fdic.gov/news/press-releases/2023/pr23016.html antranigv: This Venture Debt is intriguing, specially for startups who have a good background but are having a hard time... kinda? I guess? ahl: Acquired: Benchmark Part I ahl: Acquired: Benchmark Part II: The Dinner If we got something wrong or missed something, please file a PR! Our next show will likely be on Monday at 5p Pacific Time on our Discord server; stay tuned to our Mastodon feeds for details, or subscribe to this calendar. We'd love to have you join us, as we always love to hear from new speakers!
Rack-scale Networking

Rack-scale Networking

2023-02-2801:34:27

Bryan and Adam are joined by a number of members of the Oxide networking team to talk about the networking software that drives the Oxide rack. It turns out that rack-scale networking is hard... and has enormous benefits!We've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from February 27th, 2023.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, speakers included Ryan Goodfellow, Levon Tarver, Ben Naecker, and Arjen Roodselaar.Links Intel Tofino Series P4 (programming language) - Wikipedia p4lang/p4c: P4_16 reference compiler oxidecomputer/p4: A P4 compiler The quote crate: Rust quasi-quoting RIFT WG - Routing In Fat Trees | IETF Community Wiki Here's (much of) the live chat from the show: ahl https://github.com/oxidecomputer/oxide-and-friends/blob/master/2021_11_29.md ahl That's the Sidecar switch episode bcantrill https://p4.org/ admchl What does "at line rate" mean? Riking Line rate = As fast as the packets could possibly come. 1Gbit, 10Gbit, 100Gbit, etc admchl Do you need ASICs to hit that speed? I assume x86_64 is not going to be fast enough for these specialised operations? levon Yes, the Tofino 2 is the ASIC bcantrill You need ASICs bnaecker Yes, you really can't do these kinds of operations on a general purpose CPU. rng_drizzt Yeah, you need specialized silicon here. JustinAzoff Right, also often across all ports at the same time in both direction. a 48 port 10gbps switch will have a line rate of 960gbps (10 ** 48 ** 2) duckman So the advantage is being able to offload compute to the switch? bnaecker Yes, and specifically that you can separate the data plane (operations on the packets) from the control plane (decisions about what operations to allow or make). tahnok What's TCAM? levon Ternary Content Addressable Memory bnaecker https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content-addressable_memory#Ternary_CAMs ryaeng Sure beats logging into a number of Cisco switches and making changes at the console. admchl This is my favourite episode in a long time, this is all really fascinating. rng_drizzt the first Sidecar episode was nearly 1.5 years ago 🤯 , right after we cut the first rev levon That episode blew my mind duckman This sounds like a big deal on the scale of ebpf duckman Or bigger bnaecker It is extremely useful for understanding the processing pipelines. As long as you only run single-packet integration tests 🙂 od0 just want to go out and find things to write P4 code for JustinAzoff <@354365572554948608> yeah one way to think about that sort of thing is that xdp can be used to run little programs on a nic, where p4 is kind of like that, but running on effectively a nic with 48+ ports bcantrill https://github.com/oxidecomputer/p4 SyntheticGate sidecar is the "codename" of our switch box SyntheticGate "gimlet" is our server sled bcantrill https://github.com/oxidecomputer/propolis wmf So you have P4 and OPTE in the hypervisor at the same time? bnaecker OPTE is in the host kernel. arjenroodselaar The P4 runtime Ry described only exists in the test bed, where it high level simulates the switches. OPTE is part of the production environment. arjenroodselaar The rough difference between P4 and OPTE is that P4 works on individual packets without much concept of a session (so it can't reason about TCP streams, packet order etc, so no firewall like functionality), while OPTE aims to operate on streams of packets. JustinAzoff So you can run 100 VMs on a test system and wire them up to your virtual switch compiled by x4c? arjenroodselaar Correct. bcantrill OPTE == Oxide Packet Transformation Engine admchl Gimlet? rng_drizzt Compute server rng_drizzt The Sidecar switch is actually just a PCIe peripheral to a Gimlet. bnaecker The Gimlet managing the Sidecar is often called a "Scrimlet" for "Sidecar attached Gimlet" Riking and "how do i reconfigure this giant network without hosing my ability to reconfigure this giant network" ShaunO can identify with that - we seriously struggle to keep our own products inter-operating, let alone anyone else's levon It can feel like a Sisyphean task. a172 Setup a much smaller/simpler network in parallel that is accessible from "not your network" that gets you to the management interface. levon It's a whole new world when you can look at the actual table definitions in P4 rng_drizzt Owning all the layers here is immensely beneficial levon Those DTrace probes have been very helpful bnaecker Those probes turned out to be everywhere. They are are in: SQL queries, HTTP queries, log messages, Propolis hypervisor state, virtual storage system, networking protocol messages, the P4 emulator, and probably more that I'm forgetting about. levon For those unfamiliar with the DTrace tool, or the rationale behind leveraging DTrace over other tracing / debugging tools: https://www.cs.princeton.edu/courses/archive/fall05/cos518/papers/dtrace.pdf bcantrill https://github.com/oxidecomputer/progenitor ahl some notes on rust codegen: https://github.com/ahl/codegen-template arjenroodselaar DDM! Bring us home! a172 it astonishes me how many "cloud" type architectures are built on v4 only or v4 first. a172 IPv6 is older than Wi-Fi a172 It solves real problems. PLEASE use it. nyanotech yessss finally someone realizes broadcast domains are also failure domains JustinAzoff the worst part of v6 is trying to run dual stack v4+v6, v6 only networks are fairly simple levon And the bigger the broadcast domain, the more irritating it is to troubleshoot it bcantrill "Hash and pray" arjenroodselaar FWIW while DDM is a cool thing we're building, one of the "simple" tasks Tofino does for us is NAT between the networks of our customers and their VPC networks they implement on our platform. arjenroodselaar Simple NAT is still surprisingly expensive and being able to do that at line rate is pretty nice. Riking TCP retransmits in steady state seems like an obvious observation point? arjenroodselaar Yes, you see TCP retransmits. arjenroodselaar But if you're running say Memcache over UDP and you get a sudden burst of incoming data as a result of a large number of cache queries you drop those packets (because the buffers can't keep up) and you see cache request timeouts. arjenroodselaar FB did some work on this about 10 years ago to avoid this ingest and dropped packets which hurt your p99 latency. Riking yeah smartnic is pushing the intelligence to the machine levon I know someone who basically polled all of the switches for buffer drops in an attempt to divine which paths were dropping packets due to micro-congestion admchl I feel like I'm in a secret society meeting learning The Hidden Truth behind Reality of The Network wmf I would argue if the entire hypervisor is on the smart NIC then you're no worse off than the Oxide architecture a172 I once stumbled on a bug where the vendor's custom protocol for monitoring (because snmp/syslog just cant keep up) had a trace log on the process, that could not be turned off. Some sort of race condition enabled it, and it happened on 1/3 of system boots. It was ~20k logs/s, iirc. a172 (im going to look up those numbers) levon I haven't worked with a SmartNIC fast enough to do this well JustinAzoff We use a FPGA Nic in our products for fast packet capturing. the service that bootstraps it had an issue that caused it to log an error... for every single packet... JustinAzoff that managed to log the same error something like 250,000 times a second arjenroodselaar The problem with SmartNICs is that their power features are way less advanced than the power scaling that x86 CPUs do. So you either run them or you don't, and they come with a 50-75W penalty. Unless you can really get useful work done for that 50W budget, a x86 CPU is much more flexible. arjenroodselaar What we really want is an AMD Epyc SoC with some amount of FPGA fabric That would let you build whatever makes sense there while still having much of the flexibility with respect to how/where you consume power. a172 It was enough to mess us up. 250k would have killed us even faster. JustinAzoff Yeah, it happily wrote that error message until the multi TB data array filled up. We reworked how log rate limiting and log rotation worked after that a172 I was mostly amused that the process that the process that existed because snmp/syslog couldn't keep up was getting a syslog for every iteration of a loop in the process a172 of course, if you are sending a packet for every packet you send, that sounds like it quickly becomes an exponential problem. JustinAzoff and to circle back around, this was code inside of the vendor SDK, that is not open source, that we couldn't fix ourselves. it's one of the only components of our system that we don't control. i wish we had our own NIC (that would probably run something like p4) levon And thus, this is how we become the way we are (at Oxide) a172 ours was on production network hardware (wireless controller). There is no hope of having source or any insight true observability into it. (edit: saying there was no insight is a little harsh) JustinAzoff one thing that came up before was if p4 was like ebpf.. there's actually a ebpf backend for p4 that supports some of the features: https://github.com/p4lang/p4c/blob/main/backends/ebpf/README.md bcantrill Thanks, all! If we got something wrong or missed something, please file a PR! Our next show will likely be on Monday at 5p Pacific Time on our Discord server; stay tuned to our Mastodon feeds for details, or subscribe to this calendar. We'd love to have you join us, as we always love to hear from new speakers!
Yael Grauer joined Bryan, Adam, Steve Klabnik, and the Oxide Friends to talk about her recent Consumer Reports article on memory safety and memory safe languages. How do we inform the general public? How do we persuade practitioners and companies? Thanks for joining us, Yael!In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, we were joined by special guest Yael Grauer, and Steve Klabnik.Some of the topics we hit on, in the order that we hit them (experiment in turning the show live-chat into notes): Nahum: https://www.backblaze.com/blog/the-3-2-1-backup-strategy/ if anyone wants to read up on the 3-2-1 Backup strategy. 👅 Cyborus: can we get a link to the talk? Nahum: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9s2NxILBK8 Nahum: https://digital-lab-wp.consumerreports.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/Memory-Safety-Convening-Report-.pdf via https://digital-lab-wp.consumerreports.org/2023/01/23/new-report-future-of-memory-safety/ Nahum: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pegasus_(spyware) Cyborus: "can we talk" => "hey. you. have a panic attack. anyways i got a cool sandwich" AaronW: "of course we should have seatbelts" 😄 MattCampbell: but then you've got the C die-hards who say that Rust itself is too complex AaronW: https://twitter.com/markrussinovich/status/1571995117233504257?s=46 DanCrossNYC: People used to say the same thing about PL/I and recently the COBOL people have been saying the same thing. Nothing new under the sun. statuscalamitous: https://blog.yossarian.net/2023/02/11/The-unsafe-language-doom-principle DanCrossNYC: People who still want to treat C as a high-level assembler are saying the same stuff the PL/I people were saying when I was young. Eric Likness - carpetbomberz.com: In support of Yael, Ralph Nader wasn't/isn't an automotive engineer and he could still argue for lowering safety risks to car buyers. It's advocacy. cdaringe: As an ocaml user, i was hoping revery would take off https://github.com/revery-ui/revery statuscalamitous: https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691174952/the-tyranny-of-metrics Saethlin: Wake up babe, new 0xide reading assignment dropped AaronW: Labelled like a can of pringles -- "20% more malloc() free()!" Nahum: Relevant to rules based accounting: https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2023/02/hacking-the-tax-code.html drew: Rigorous definitions of “unsafe code” just wont cut it ig ig: 40% less direct pointer arithmetic than the leading brand of operating systems a172: How does principle based accounting even work? Like, how do you define if something violates the principle or not, without just turning it back into rules based? Eden: Checkboxes are meaningful for operational checklists. Aviation and medicine use them pretty heavily. Not so meaningful for systemic work like developing a new aircraft or a new surgery. Eden: So I guess a rules-based approach works for lines of code, but breaks down for project-level decisions such as which language to use. Saethlin: The S in IoT is for security benstoltz: ifixit repairability score for HW should have an analog for SW/FW. DanCrossNYC: That's precisely what the pl/i folks acted like 25 years ago. sam801: c++ will live on thru carbon, cppfront, and val. DanCrossNYC: Prediction: carbon is doa. Saethlin: I'll believe it once anyone uses those ig: I think the other part is there's some really important pieces of software that everyone uses daily which use memory unsafe languages. Our web browsers, and our operating systems. AaronW: I live in a condo and I still unplug expensive electronics during a thunderstorm. Maybe it's because I had many electronics fried when I was young, and my first language was C++. Eric Likness - carpetbomberz.com: Same with answering a landline during a thunderstorm. DanCrossNYC: Had to stop training during thunderstorms in the Marines. Eden: My day job is security. 😉 I rail against compliance checklists on a regular basis because a lot of auditors insist on the checkbox rather than proper security consideration. For example, PCI-DSS requires password rotation, which everyone has known for decades leads to users picking worse passwords. alilleybrinker: https://www.usenix.org/system/files/sec22summer_alexopoulos.pdf statuscalamitous: https://security.googleblog.com/2022/12/memory-safe-languages-in-android-13.html a172: Google and Mozilla are making pretty good strides in migrating their browser to Rust. Still a ton of work to go, but entire systems have been moved to Rust. JamesBrock: "Lindy" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindy_effect statuscalamitous: https://security.googleblog.com/2021/04/rust-in-android-platform.html DanCrossNYC: Another issue with C/C++ in particular is that UB causes latent bugs to surface years later. alilleybrinker: In the paper linked above, the average lifetime looks to have been about 3.5 years. Saethlin: I learned Rust faster than C++ alilleybrinker: Related, you might be interested in EPSS: https://www.first.org/epss/ DanCrossNYC: Rust requires a bit of humility. For veteran C programmers, that can be a gut punch. srockets: “Compiler says no” is something that Haskell was proud of, but Rust is the first language I’ve seen that managed to get popular despite of it alilleybrinker: Humility also requires a lot of Rust https://github.com/oxidecomputer/humility Eden: I do like the checklist item that every change must be accompanied by a ticket number. Then the company goes and changes the ticket system, and we lose all our history of why things are in place until it slowly builds up again. Eden: Seriously, checklists are great for operational tasks. Always include a ticket number. Always back up the config in this way ahead of time. Always notify these teams in this way when you're starting a change. AaronW: I have often wondered about learning multiple languages in parallel. JamesBrock: The easiest language to teach and learn will be Roc lang, too bad it's not ready yet. AaronW: A Python and Rust/Go, etc. srockets: As a first programming course? alilleybrinker: I've taught Rust to undergrads in a university Programming Languages course, which was it's own unique thing because it's about learning underlying concepts, not Rust per se. drew: We are getting dangerously close to the “teaches class in rust and then realizes it was a bad idea” prediction..!. ig: Under the "Government and Advocacy" part of the recommendations - there's probably an angle where FedRAMP Authorization could be used to drive increased usage of memory safe languages. srockets: As a first programming course I don’t think it’s going to work. As 2nd course, that would be great dedactically I think ahl: why not the SEC? statuscalamitous: everything is securities fraud alilleybrinker: Unsafe code? Securities fraud alilleybrinker: https://www.c-span.org/video/?c4808083/user-clip-rust-language-chosen alilleybrinker: Clip of that hearing. DanCrossNYC: At what point do we start putting in place Professional Engineer qualifications for software engineers, overseen by IEEE or something Eden: There are very few aircraft manufacturers and very few aircraft operators compared to software manufacturers and distributors/operators. Cyborus: "our product isn't hackable" is just seen as a challenge AaronW: Unbreakable Linux! Eden: So when there's an incident with an aircraft, the NTSB has very few people to talk to in the investigation. mxshift: "isn't hackable" usually is in the same list as "military-grade encryption" statuscalamitous: http://www.paulgraham.com/hijack.html Cyborus: oh that's awful alilleybrinker: Wow and it's still up Sevan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqgS4UT8Lp4 ig: https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2021/05/12/executive-order-on-improving-the-nations-cybersecurity/ Section 4 is all about the software supply chain, and in this case it was the Secretary of Commerce and NIST was involved. Don't think it mentions memory safety, though. ahl: Klabnik 2024! ig: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_Ring alilleybrinker: Hey, also fun to note that the OpenSSF has an in-progress workstream (starting this week) to advocate for / advance the use of memory safe languages in open source. Saethlin: The Silicon Ring Nahum: For me the Therac 25 paper in college was really chilling. benstoltz: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therac-25 Eden: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ritual_of_the_Calling_of_an_Engineer ahl: Oxide challenge coins! Dignissi: Perhaps a ring buffer? shandrew: Count me in for a challenge coin! DanCrossNYC: Challenge coins are a military thing. Nahum: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Challenge_coin DanCrossNYC: Oorah! AaronW: https://twitter.com/beaker/status/414894015926902785?s=46 DanCrossNYC: https://terminallance.com/2010/04/06/terminal-lance-27-challenge-coins-not-a-grunt-thing/ alilleybrinker: It would be fun to go through the CWE (Common Weakness Enumeration) view for "Weaknesses in Software Written in C" and then characterize exactly which ones Rust stops: https://cwe.mitre.org/data/definitions/658.html mxshift: Taps "CVEs are a communications and coordination tool, not a quality metric" sign Nahum: https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/coin-check/ was a great episode on challenge coins. shandrew: Our “moving Flickr out of yahoo” challenge coin https://flic.kr/p/2ogMSFg Sevan: https://twitter.com/MiodVallat/status/519065338898837505 meta: thank you yael!! "- a172: I pulled this up thinking it may be a good basis for a coin design. I don't think that's actually the case, but it is cool and people here might like it: https://www.redbubble.com/i/sticker/Rust-colored-by-ShoeBill99/38427192.EJUG5" AaronW: This has been fascinating, thank you <@568519940550688778>, Oxide, and friends. alilleybrinker: Great conversation! Thanks yael, and everyone else! od0: god bless AaronW: "Bless your heart" AaronDGoldman: Bless your heart Nahum: "Good on you" I've heard in the
Members of the Oxide team join Bryan and Adam to talk about our journey through compliance (spoiler: we passed!). Oxide and Friends: February 6th, 2023 We've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from February 6th, 2023.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, speakers on February 6th included Arjen Roodselaar, Nathanael Huffman, Robert Keith, Eric Aasen, and Josh Clulow,Some of the topics we hit on, in the order that we hit them:If we got something wrong or missed something, please file a PR! Our next show will likely be on Monday at 5p Pacific Time on our Discord server; stay tuned to our Mastodon feeds for details, or subscribe to this calendar. We'd love to have you join us, as we always love to hear from new speakers!
Revisiting Unikernels

Revisiting Unikernels

2023-01-2401:23:16

Oxide and Friends: January 23rd, 2023Revisiting UnikernelsWe've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from January 23rd, 2023.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, speakers on January 23rd included Steve Klabnik, Dan Cross, and others.Some of the topics we hit on, in the order that we hit them:Bryan's 2016 blog post Unikernels are unfit for production If we got something wrong or missed something, please file a PR! Our next show will likely be on Monday at 5p Pacific Time on our Discord server; stay tuned to our Mastodon feeds for details, or subscribe to this calendar. We'd love to have you join us, as we always love to hear from new speakers!Give feedback
The Power of Proto Boards!

The Power of Proto Boards!

2023-01-1701:41:32

We've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from January 16th, 2023.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, we were joined by Nathanael Huffman, Cliff Biffle, Rick Altherr, Matt Keeter, Eric Aasen, and Dan Cross.Check out the show notes on github to browse the images. (00:00) - Intro (11:42) - Gemini (18:33) - Root of Trust (RoT) carrier (20:53) - Power (23:41) - Trimmed Power (28:11) - SPI MUX (29:38) - SPI MUX rework (33:14) - Gimletlet (41:10) - Gimletlet NIC (46:28) - DIMMlet (56:39) - Gimletlet mk2 (58:27) - Adapters (59:54) - Adapters zoom (01:01:47) - Ignition (FPGA) (01:04:40) - Gimletlet peripherals (01:06:12) - Gimletlet with management switch (1/2) (01:07:22) - Gimletlet with management switch (2/2) (01:09:21) - Kludge.2 (K.2) (01:16:23) - Donglet (01:25:49) - RoT carrier carrier (01:26:17) - Tranceiver load tester (01:29:06) - Load slammer for Tofino 2 (01:31:30) - Power (improved) (01:32:08) - Part Toaster (01:33:28) - K.2r2 Images of each proto board: @11:42 Gemini @18:33 Root of Trust (RoT) carrier @20:53 Power @23:41 Trimmed Power @28:11 SPI MUX @29:38 SPI MUX rework @33:14 Gimletlet @41:10 Gimletlet NIC @46:28 DIMMlet @56:39 Gimletlet mk2 @58:27 Adapter zoom @59:54 Adapters zoom @1:01:47 Ignition (FPGA) @1:04:40 Gimletlet peripherals @1:06:12 Gimletlet with management switch (1/2) @1:07:22 Gimletlet with management switch (2/2) @1:09:21 Kludge.2 (K.2) @1:16:23 Donglet @1:25:49 RoT carrier carrier @1:26:17 Transceiver load tester @1:29:06 Load Slammer for Tofino 2 @1:31:30 Power (improved) @1:32:08 Part Toaster @1:33:28 K.2r2 If we got something wrong or missed something, please file a PR! Our next show will likely be on Monday at 5p Pacific Time on our Discord server; stay tuned to our Mastodon feeds for details, or subscribe to this calendar. We'd love to have you join us, as we always love to hear from new speakers!
Predictions 2023!

Predictions 2023!

2023-01-1001:37:13

See github for the list of predictions (and add your own!)
Break it down with Ian BrownWe've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from December 26th, 2022.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, our special guest was Ian Brown.
A Debugging Odyssey

A Debugging Odyssey

2022-12-1901:35:13

A Debugging OdysseyWe've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from December 19th, 2022.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, our special guest was Dave Pacheco. 
Podcasts for Podcast-Lovers

Podcasts for Podcast-Lovers

2022-12-1301:28:41

Oxide and Friends: December 12th, 2022Podcasts for Podcast-LoversWe've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from December 12th, 2022.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, speakers on MM DD included XXX, and YY. (Did we miss your name and/or get it wrong? Drop a PR!)Podcasts mentioned on the show Ziade&Ford Advisors Brady Heywood EconTalkLamorna Ash on Dark, Salt, Clear The Amp Hour Electronics Podcast Tools & Craft Resilient web design Software Defined Talk Kubernetes: The Documentary part 1 and part 2 devtools FM Science and Futurism with Isaac Arthur As the Ice Cream Churns Lost Terminal Let's Make A Sci-Fi Invest Like the Best: Shane BattierNew York Times: The No-Stats All-Star Mark and Carrie NerdOut@Spotify: Open Source Work Is Work The Flop House The Moth It Could Happen Here Playdate Podcast The Chernobyl Podcast Behind the Bastards Behind the Police Terrorism Bad Guys We F****d How Did This Get Made: Holy Matrimony Startup: How Not to Pitch a Billionaire Boom / Bust HQ Trivia Acquired: TSMC The Pitch Show Bad Bets Tools Embedded.fm Huff Duffer Other links from the audience BSD Now Hardcore History EMCrit Podcasthttps://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWNyaXQub3JnL2ZlZWQvcG9kY2FzdC8?sa=X&ved=0CAMQ4aUDahcKEwiIuNvvuPX7AhUAAAAAHQAAAAAQAQ&hl=en https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/if-books-could-kill/id1651876897 The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week https://99percentinvisible.org/about/the-show/ https://intel.com/aipodcast https://nextcloud.com/podcast/ https://gzmshows.com/shows/listing/the-big-fib/ http://wandb.com/podcast https://feeds.captivate.fm/gradient-dissent/ https://blart.libsyn.com/ https://darknetdiaries.com/ https://theretrohour.com/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPxHg4192hLDpTI2w7F9rPg https://reasonablysound.com https://www.youtube.com/@NoBoilerplate https://www.youtube.com/@Namtao https://signalsandthreads.com/ https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w13xtvg9/episodes/downloads https://darknetdiaries.com/ https://blog.mainframe.dev/ https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/revolutions/id703889772 https://gimletmedia.com/shows/mystery-show https://mast.hpc.social/@freemin7 https://feeds.megaphone.fm/uncivil https://open.spotify.com/episode/4cJ7NqRen0OSJ2a4Wg4uaO?si=XYNwryI0Sc6MeYRboeUcgA https://mango.pdf.zone/finding-former-australian-prime-minister-tony-abbotts-passport-number-on-instagram https://open.spotify.com/episode/5EUBBoQVZtQMkhTjfSIvzu?si=j9wcHSKGSfCiP2khHsWBug http://www.autonocast.com https://risky.biz https://share.transistor.fm/s/7809611e https://share.transistor.fm/s/375557ff https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/22/podcasts/rabbit-hole-prologue.html https://lavaforgood.com/bone-valley/ If we got something wrong or missed something, please file a PR! Our next show will likely be on Monday at 5p Pacific Time on our Discord server; stay tuned to our Mastodon feeds for details, or subscribe to this calendar. We'd love to have you join us, as we always love to hear from new speakers!
Oxide and Friends: November 28th, 2022Leaving Twitter with Tim BrayWe've been hosting a live show weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour, and recording them all; here is the recording from November 28th, 2022.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, our special guest was Tim Bray. Other speakers on November 28th included Adam Jacob, Toasterson, and raggi. (Did we miss your name and/or get it wrong? Drop a PR!)Some of the topics we hit on, in the order that we hit them: Bye, Twitter by Tim Bray jwz: PSA: Do Not Use Services That Hate The Internet jwz: Mastodon stampede "Federation" now apparently means "DDoS yourself." Tim Bray On Algorithms On terrible Twitter ads: @intelnews: "Moore’s Law only stops when innovation stops.” PRs needed! If we got something wrong or missed something, please file a PR! Our next show will likely be on Monday at 5p Pacific Time on our Discord server; stay tuned to our Mastodon feeds for details, or subscribe to this calendar. We'd love to have you join us, as we always love to hear from new speakers!
Mastodon with Kris Nova

Mastodon with Kris Nova

2022-11-1401:30:44

We've been holding a Twitter Space weekly on Mondays at 5p for about an hour. Even though it's not (yet?) a feature of Twitter Spaces, we have been recording them all; here is the recording for our Twitter Space for November 14th, 2022.In addition to Bryan Cantrill and Adam Leventhal, our special guest was Kris Nova. Other speakers on November 14th included XXX, and YY. (Did we miss your name and/or get it wrong? Drop a PR!)
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