Claim Ownership

Author:

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

 Episodes
Reverse
As TikTok’s voice of what she calls Gay Geology, Denali (@dykanite) talks with us about why representation and inclusivity is important for queer folks in the geosciences. Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
When you look at pottery, have you thought much about the clay used to make it? The indigenous Shoshone people of the Greater Yellowstone area sure did! The different clays used in their wares consist of minerals that can be traced back to rock types in the region and where those pieces were found tells us how far the people travelled within a region. Geo-archeological searcher Chloe Geddes tells us of her findings and explains how geology overlaps with archeology in many interesting ways. Source Material (PDF Poster): https://drive.google.com/file/d/1JxNvT6ctsbHg_7qNEz-cX9o5TcSTRDxf/view?usp=drivesdk Follow Chloe on Instagram: https://instagram.com/geologywithchloe Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
Researcher Savannah Devine gives us the scoop on the effect that aftershocks of the 2019 Ridgecrest earthquakes had on these precariously perched pinnacles. Savannah’s Poster: https://www.scec.org/meetings/2020/am/poster/134 Another poster for more context: https://www.scec.org/meetings/2021/am/poster/044 Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
Let’s go over the history of this big hole in the middle of Arizona and put together the evidence gathered by researchers throughout the decades that ultimately led us to confirm the cause to be a terrestrial impact. Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
How a geology PhD student landed a spot as a NASA astronaut and it wasn’t even the coolest thing she ever did. Kathy’s thesis: https://dalspace.library.dal.ca/handle/10222/75117 Used copies of Handprints on Hubble: https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/handprints-on-hubble-an-astronauts-story-of-invention_kathryn-d-sullivan/20914627/ Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
Learn the story of Rachel Carson, author of the book that changed how the world thinks of about our environment: Silent Spring. Referenced in the episode: Silent Spring (free to read if you’re in Canada) https://www.fadedpage.com/showbook.php?pid=20151002 Use of DDT in WW2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l02B6RyQWCQ Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
I sat down in the lobby of a geology conference with my mic and had conversations with people about why these are important and what students and professionals can gain from them. Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
Wendy Bohon is an earthquake geologist, science communicator, published researcher, acclaimed presenter, and outspoken advocate for women in STEM. In this episode, we talk about the many aspects of her work, representation in geoscience, and how to break into science communication yourself. Learn more about Wendy: http://drwendybohon.com Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
When learning about Earth history, many of us learn about the Alfred Wegener, the Father of Plate Tectonics, but do you know about the *woman* whose discovery influenced the theory of plate tectonics? Let’s talk about Marie Tharp, the geologist and cartographer who discovered the mid-Atlantic ridge and thrust forth a new understanding of one of our planet’s most ancient processes. The story behind her discovery mirrors that of many woman scientists; her ideas dismissed by male colleagues who ultimately wound up taking credit for her work once they realized she was right all along. I for one propose we call her the Mother of Plate Tectonics and Proving Men Wrong. Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
Each grain of sand on the planet came from a rock that weathered down to almost nothing. Studying these remains helps us to piece together what the earth was like when that rock was formed, millions even billions of years ago. Now, thanks to a new technique developed by researchers in Australia, home of oldest known grain of sand, we can look back in time at the ancient settings in which these sediments were dispersed to uncover clues about Earth’s earliest tectonic processes. Source Material: ‘Understanding ancient tectonic settings through detrital zircon analysis’ https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012821X22000619 Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
Florence Bascom is known as America’s first woman geologist. To celebrate Women’s History Month, let’s talk about her accomplishments: not just her advancements she contributed not just the field of geology, but the impact she had on all the women who have studied it after her. FOR WOMEN IN GEOSCIENCE: Sign up to be part of the mini-doc project here https://docs.google.com/forms/d/19gVrUHrSU1qIG-P_qrCvI0rh3ssP3r8oUs79OLI0k84/edit Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
There are more than 5,000 active submarine volcanoes on Earth, all varying in size and eruption style. Studying the rocks formed at these underwater vents is necessary to understanding the explosiveness of future eruptions, some of which can even burst lava and ash out of the water’s surface. As it turns out, the most explosive ones are spewing pink pumice, and exactly how pink they are is a crucial detail. Source material: Knafelc et al, Havre 2012 pink pumice is evidence of a short-lived, deep-sea, magnetite nanolite-driven explosive eruption, February 2022 https://www.nature.com/articles/s43247-022-00355-3 Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
We’ve all seen those action-packed, albeit cheesy, natural disaster movies. MONSTER EARTHQUAKE! KILLER TSUNAMI! THE MOON IS CRASHING INTO THE EARTH!!!!!! With the theatrical release of Moonfall and all its scientific fallacies, it’s a perfect time to talk about Hollywood’s obsession with geological disasters. What they get wrong, what they get right, and why people love it regardless. Featuring guest speaker and movie buff Ryan Sippel, owner of the lengthiest and most detailed Letterboxd record known to man. Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
Mount Vesuvius decimated Pompeii nearly 2,000 years ago and has had dozens more eruptions since. Even though its most recent was way back in 1944, it’s still considered geologically active. This begs the question: when will it erupt again? By studying garnets found at volcanic deposits from eruptions dating back 10,000 years, predictions can be made about the fate of the magma currently residing 6-8km beneath the deadly volcano. Source material: Jörn-Frederik Wotzlaw et al, Garnet petrochronology reveals the lifetime and dynamics of phonolitic magma chambers at Somma-Vesuvius, January 2022 Read for free ➡️ https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.abk2184 Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
The internet is a highway lined with billboards promising enrichment, entertainment, and information. Picture a sign for shocking and exciting news on scientific discoveries… You’d want to learn more, too, right? However, following those signs too often leads down a dangerous path to misinformation and even straight up lies. How serious can this really be? Well, take it from scientists when we say: clickbait is destroying science journalism and dumbing down our population in the process. Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
The Earth has been cooling slowly since its creation ~4.5 billion years ago, but new research on the mantle-derived mineral, bridgmanite, suggests it’s actually a bit faster than previously expected. What does this mean for the future of our planet? Source Material: M. Murakami, A.F. Goncharov, N. Miyajima, D. Yamazaki, N. Holtgrewe, Radiative thermal conductivity of single-crystal bridgmanite at the core-mantle boundary with implications for thermal evolution of the Earth, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Volume 578. Read here for free: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012821X21005859 Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
The identification of several earthquakes along the San Andreas fault occurring between 700 to 7,000 years ago provides deeper insight into the region’s seismicity on a cyclical scale. Lead author Bryan Castillo joins us to answer questions about the research and explain the significance of such a discovery. Follow him on social media and learn more about his work at https://linktr.ee/earthquake_dude Source Material: https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/gsa/geosphere/article/17/3/685/596773/Prehistoric-earthquakes-on-the-Banning-strand-of Bryan A. Castillo, Sally F. McGill, Katherine M. Scharer, Doug Yule, Devin McPhillips, James McNeil, Sourav Saha, Nathan D. Brown, Seulgi Moon; Prehistoric earthquakes on the Banning strand of the San Andreas fault, North Palm Springs, California. Geosphere 2021;; 17 (3): 685–710. Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
Continuing my rundown of 2021’s coolest geoscience news, I get into publications from July-December and even share the inside scoop into what we can expect in 2022. To all the eager researchers excited about publishing their work next year, we can’t wait for it either! SOURCES: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1cjOJ8Bd25ge92MxOejqFDPzee-Ub7sLQEqJw4NNVlLc/edit Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
To wrap up 2021, I’m going over the coolest news in geoscience month by month. This episode covers January-June and the part 2 will have the rest. I’ll also be reflecting on the first full month of this podcast and sharing where I hope to take it in the new year. Links to the papers/articles discussed: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1cjOJ8Bd25ge92MxOejqFDPzee-Ub7sLQEqJw4NNVlLc/edit Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
Thanks to seismic waves, we can now see underneath the massive ice sheet that covers Greenland. Through imaging of these waves, the sub-glacial terrain was mapped to understand which areas are susceptible to more rapid flow and melting. This is a cool topic for me because it’s related to research I did on flow dynamics of the ice sheet! Back then, I used a less-accurate dataset of the ground elevation under the ice, so this is incredible because it could provide me with better results when I eventually finish the project! Source material: Jones, G.A., Ferreira, A.M.G., Kulessa, B. et al. Uppermost crustal structure regulates the flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Nat Commun 12, 7307 (2021). https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-27537-5 Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store