DiscoverLiving Proof: the Isaac Newton Institute podcast
Living Proof: the Isaac Newton Institute podcast
Claim Ownership

Living Proof: the Isaac Newton Institute podcast

Author: Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences

Subscribed: 0Played: 1
Share

Description

The Isaac Newton Institute is the world's foremost mathematical research centre. Living Proof aims to highlight the diverse people and interconnected topics linked to its many activities. Interviewees range from visiting academics and lecturers to mathematicians, other scientists, musicians, artists, students, and prominent figures within the University of Cambridge and beyond. The podcast typically involves mathematical themes, but is specifically aimed at a general audience. The focus is on the subjects being interviewed and the social stories they have to tell, not just on the significance and details of the research they may be undertaking. We hope there is interest and inspiration here for everyone.- The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (UK) is an international research centre based in Cambridge, UK. A part of the University of Cambridge, it has been hosting research programmes on mathematical themes since July 1992.Visit > www.newton.ac.uk/news/ini-podcast
58 Episodes
Reverse
Thanks to the generous support of the Simons Foundation, the INI-Simons Postdoctoral Fellowships in Mathematics is now in its second year of enabling “exceptional early career researchers in the mathematical sciences” to gain “experience, independence and new connections on their way to a successful academic career”. In this episode of Living Proof, Dan Aspel speak to Dr Nicolas Boulle to learn about his journey through mathematics so far, and to find out what being awarded this Fellowship – which involves spending six months on an INI research programme and six months working at Cambridge University’s Faculty of Maths – means to him personally.
Thanks to the generous support of the Simons Foundation, the INI-Simons Postdoctoral Fellowships in Mathematics are enabling “exceptional early career researchers in the mathematical sciences” to gain “experience, independence and new connections on their way to a successful academic career”. In this episode of Living Proof, Dan Aspel speak to Dr Patrick Sprenger to learn about his journey through mathematics so far, and to find out what being awarded this Fellowship – which involves spending six months on an INI research programme and six months working at Cambridge University’s Faculty of Maths – means to him personally.
Forced to leave Ukraine, and his work at the Institute of Hydromechanics at the National Academy of Sciences, due to the Russian invasion of February 2022, Yuriy Semenov found sanctuary in Britain at the University of East Anglia. This was in part thanks to support from INI's "Solidarity for mathematicians" programme.This episode of the podcast tells Yuriy's story in his own words.00:00 - Introduction00:43 - Welcome01:20 - Discovering the Solidarity for mathematicians programme, career history05:20 - Leaving Ukraine following the Russian invasion: "Life changed in one day... each day started with reading the news and tracking down the front line... war reminders were frequent"07:30 - "From time to time rockets struck the town and killed people."08:30 - "The work of a mathematician is always possible."09:20 - Joining INI activities, maintaining links with Ukraine15:00 - Words for others applying to "Solidary for mathematicians": "I strongly suggest to apply for this programme."
Professor Nataliya Vaisfel’d was until recently Head of the Chair of methods of mathematical physics at Odesa I. I. Mechnykov National University. She is currently a Senior Lecturer at King’s College London. Forced to flee Ukraine after the Russian invasion of her home country in February of this year, Nataliya has since travelled across Europe with her wheelchair-bound mother and their dogs, eventually finding sanctuary in Britain in part thanks to INI’s "Solidarity for mathematicians" programme.This podcast tells Nataliya’s story in her own words.00:00 - Introduction01:00 - Travelling across Europe, finding a place to live and work13:30 - Fleeing Ukraine as a refugee ("our generation... we only saw this in some films, movies about the second World War")18:20 - "If now it is terrible, and it seems to you absolutely dark around you, and you can't see something ahead... believe. You should trust. It will return and you will see some light. Sure. Absolutely. Never, never, never surrender."
Episode published 20/09/22In episode #45 of Living Proof, Dan Aspel and Christie Marr are thrilled to meet Ben Sparks and Katie Steckles. Ben is a mathematician, musician and speaker based at the University of Bath who works with groups as diverse as the Advanced Mathematics Support Programme and the hugely popular Numberphile YouTube channel. Katie, meanwhile, is a mathematician and communicator who lectures at Sheffield Hallam University and is regularly found presenting entertaining and insightful talks everywhere from science festivals to schools and theatres to BBC radio and TV. As they often work together, these two experienced explainers and explorers of mathematics have much advice and insight to offer to the listener.00:00 - Introduction00:47 - Welcome01:23 - About Katie02:48 - About Ben04:40 - Their work together09:44 - Working remotely as a speaker and communicator, the pros and cons14:20 - Specific advice on kit and equipment for communicating maths22:40 - Is there something unique about communicating maths?36:10 - Personal highlights of current work46:00 - What to do when things go wrong: a mathematician's "emergency toolkit"53:00 - What does the future hold? Find out more about Ben Sparks and Katie Steckles via...> www.bensparks.co.uk> katiesteckles.co.uk
Episode published 31/08/22In episode #44 of Living Proof, Dan Aspel and Christie Marr speak to both Don Zagier and Silke Zagier. Don is a widely respected number theorist and currently and currently "Retired Scientific Member and Director" of the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in Bonn. This summer he has been involved in two INI programmes: K-theory, algebraic cycles and motivic homotopy theory and New connections in number theory and physics. Silke, meanwhile, is an experienced administrator and historian of mathematics. Topics covered include their individual life stories, as well as the realities of being a married, travelling couple within the world of academia.00:00 - Introduction00:48 - Welcome01:20 - Involvement in two consecutive INI programmes, travelling together as part of an academic career06:30 - Being the partner of an INI visitor, the potential for bringing young children12:20 - How to earn a significant academic reputation ("I just kept getting older and older... and people look up to you because you're still there!")14:20: Enthusiasm, and the motto "modular forms are everywhere"16:35: Adjusting to post-pandemic working, the challenges of delayed programmes at INI18:20: Highlight of an INI visit: to work with such a variety of people, and to visit other institutions (see Talks elsewhere)24:58: Silke's research into the history of Japanese mathematics during the country's "sakoku" period.
Episode published 06/07/22In episode #43 of Living Proof, Maha Kaouri and Christie Marr speak to Tom Whipple, Science Editor at The Times. Tom read Maths at Cambridge and has been covering science for the Times since 2011. He was recently involved in a Newton Gateway/V-KEMS/RAMP Virtual Study Group on The Public Perception of Science, where he presented a challenge on Communicating Mathematics. Tom was then invited to the Institute to learn more about all the mathematics programmes and activities INI hosts.00:20 – Welcome00:50 – The journey from a mathematics undergraduate to a scientific journalist03:36 – The challenge of communicating mathematics07:57 – The public perception of mathematics10:46 – Reflecting on the benefits of a mathematics degree13:59 – What makes a great maths story? How to persuade an editor?20:32 – The impact of COVID-19 on scientific journalism & the public understanding of mathematics26:01 – Maths-related topics & engaging the audience
In episode #42 of Living Proof, Dan Aspel and Christie Marr speak to Prof Parimala Raman of Emory University. Parimala, the Kirk Distinguished Visiting Fellow for K-theory, algebraic cycles and motivic homotopy theory programme, has extensive experience of research in her home country of India, where she represents a significant role model for younger women beginning their careers in mathematics. Not only this, but she also has some uplifting thoughts to share on the "two-body problem" often faced by couples simultaneously pursuing academic careers in a job market where geography is a significant factor.00:00 - Introduction00:49 - Welcome01:30 - First discovering mathematics, encouragement by Parimala's father03:20 - Gender and mathematics, pursuing a PHD as a woman05:20 - Choosing Emory University, being close to her son07:50 - Becoming a role model for younger women, "I feel very honoured to have this kind of impact"09:10 - Solving "the two-body problem" of following a partner's career around the globe, from Tanzania to Switzerland to India, "If he had not followed me, I would have given up mathematics at that point"13:10 - Reconnecting with peers at INI's "K-theory, algebraic cycles and motivic homotopy theory" programme, "it has been a very, very enjoyable and fruitful trip"17:30 - "Grab the opportunity!"
Dan Aspel speaks to Prof Herbert Gangl to learn about his unique mathematical jewellery the "Gems of Hypolytos".
Dan Aspel and Christie Marr speak to Prof Rama Govindarajan of the International Centre for Theoretical Sciences in Bengaluru.
Dan Aspel and Plus magazine’s Dr Marianne Freiberger are joined by the irrepressible Prof Anita Layton of the University of Waterloo.
Dan Aspel catches up with Antoine Gagnebin, an INI workshop participant who's made the exciting decision to travel from Amsterdam to Cambridge by bicycle. Find out the "how" and the "why" of his forthcoming adventure in this short episode.
Professor Hoffmann has spent much of the past decade working with the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, its Quantum Leap Africa initiative, and a host of other groups and NGOs across the African continent, all focused on the support and pursuit of higher mathematics. And yet, in her own words, she’s still “very junior” at her home institution herself. How is this possible?
In episode #36 of Living Proof, Dan Aspel and Christie Marr speak to Dr Nira Chamberlain, not only the “5th most influential black person in the UK”, but possibly “the world’s most interesting mathematician”.
Dan Aspel speaks to Dr Anagha Madhusudanan, one of the first three recipients of the new Simons Postdoctoral Fellowships in Mathematics.
Dan Aspel speaks to Dr Antoine Remond-Tiedrez, one of the first five recipients of the new Simons Postdoctoral Fellowships in Mathematics.
Dan Aspel speaks to the four organisers of the "Cluster algebras and representation theory" programme (September to December 2021) to hear their thoughts on its successes and progress so far.
Dan Aspel speaks to Dr Aluna Rizzoli, one of the first three recipients of the new Simons Postdoctoral Fellowships in Mathematics.
Dan Aspel speaks to Dr Avi Mayorcas, one of the first three recipients of the new Simons Postdoctoral Fellowships in Mathematics.
Dan Aspel speaks to Dr Emine Yildirim, one of the first three recipients of the new Simons Postdoctoral Fellowships in Mathematics.
loading
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store