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A Gift For Grief

Author: Louise Bates

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Join Louise Bates as she speaks with individuals who have experienced the pain of losing a loved one.

Through this podcast, Louise shares the stories of those who have found ways to cope with their loss and offers inspiration to those who are struggling to find their own path through grief.


Louise's own journey through the loss of her son Matthew, has given her a deep understanding of the pain and darkness that can come with grief. Her approach to this sensitive subject is both real and honest, creating a safe space for individuals to share their experiences and find comfort in the stories of others.


If you are currently experiencing grief or you feel stuck in your journey, please know that you are not alone. Welcome to this safe and compassionate community.


https://linktr.ee/louisebates



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21 Episodes
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Join me as I reflect on season 1 of my podcast. It's been an incredible journey filled with growth and learning, and I've cherished every minute of it. Throughout this season, I've had the privilege of hosting some truly inspiring guests who have not only shared their stories but also helped me navigate my own grief journey.I want to take a moment to express my gratitude to all of you who have been listening and supporting the podcast. Your feedback and encouragement have meant the world to me. Hearing how this podcast has resonated with you and aided you in your own healing process has been incredibly rewarding.As I prepare for season two, I'm excited about the possibilities that lie ahead. While the core theme of grief will remain at the heart of this podcast, I'm open to exploring different angles and perspectives in order to provide a more comprehensive understanding of this complex topic.This is where you come in. I value your input immensely, and I would love to hear your thoughts on what topics you would like me to focus on? What questions do you want me to ask? I appreciate any feedback. Thanks for listening.Remember to check out The Twins Parable by Pablo J.Luis Molinero as discussed in this episode.Louise xx Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Ep 19 - Endless Love

Ep 19 - Endless Love

2023-12-1301:17:15

My guest today is Sharon Luca-Chatha. She is an Author, Public Speaker, and Podcaster. Sharon’s life was turned upside down in 2012 when she lost her precious son Luca to stillbirth at 36 weeks. Sharon has a sad story - but since then she has gone on to give the ‘gift of time’ to thousands of grieving families through her award-winning Luca Foundation. Sharon is driven by her vision to fund enough cuddle cots to service every maternity unit throughout the UK, so no one else has to go through what she went through.I actually cried during this episode as sharon talked about her experience. Her story is heart breaking, from the moment she found out her son’s heartbeat had stopped, to the way the hospital cared for her during and after the labour. Sharon could hear the cries of other babies being born, knowing her baby had died. After the birth, her son Luca was taken away and she didn’t get to see her son for nine hours. This is my longest episode to date and it’s a real tearjerker. Grab a cuppa and a box of tissues and find out how Sharon’s son Luca was born sleeping. Discover how she went from having a breakdown, to starting an award-winning charity in Luca’s name. This lady is incredible. If you would like to get in touch with Sharon or support her charity in any way, check out her website: (https://thelucafoundation.org.uk)Sharon's podcast is called - Live the life you loveOther links and books we talked about today: Mo Gawdat - Solve For HappyAngel Warrior - Sharon Luca-ChathaWhy Did Grandad Die - Sharon Luca-Hatha Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
How do you come to terms with sudden child loss? From being perfectly healthy to dead in twelve hours and only seven years old. Emily Graham is that bereaved parent. Her son Cameron died at Christmas 2015. Child loss is one of the most excruciating experiences a parent can endure. However, within the midst of the overwhelming pain and confusion, lies an opportunity to transform this darkness into a beacon of light by offering support to others who are also grieving. Eight years on and Emily is now a Certified Grief Coach and author of her published book called ‘Confessions of Child Loss’. She holds regular online workshops and webinars supporting others navigating the grief journey and she also has a beautiful blog called ‘Just Playing House’. Links & books discussed in this episode include: Grief Recovery Institute Emily’s website - www.afterchildloss.comMegan Devine - www.refugeingrief.com Dr. Mary Neal - To Heaven and Back (near-death experiences)Jeff Olsen - Knowing (near-death experiences) Dr Joanne Cacciatore, Grief From Darkness To Light Comforting Truths from Heaven by Jeff Jansen Bearing the Unbearable by Dr. Jo CacciatoreSigns by Laura Lynne JacksonGrief Recovery InstitutePsychic Medium - Laura Lynne Jackson     Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
My guest today is Becci Willets. Becci is a GP and she has a beautiful blog called, Bereavement and Beyond. She set up this blog to not only remember her dad who sadly died last July, but also to share practical advice about death, dying and funerals. Becci’s experience of grief helps her to support her patients because she can speak about death, dying and bereavement not only from a professional angle but also a personal one.  Becci describes herself as an over sharer and she loves to talk but she admits that when her dad died, she found it hard to talk about her grief. Becci started writing and this gave her a way of processing her grief. Her dad’s death has been extremely difficult, but Becci recognises the gifts that have come from her experience, and she appreciates that she can now truly connect with her patients going through grief.  Sharing our grief stories with others reminds us that we are not alone in this journey. When we open up and let others in, we give them permission to do the same. Suddenly, we find ourselves surrounded by people who have walked similar paths and faced similar heartaches. And it's in these shared experiences that healing begins to take place. We learn from each other's stories, gain insight into new coping strategies, and find solace knowing that someone truly understands. These connections become a form of solidarity, creating a sense of community amidst the chaos of grief. So let's continue to share our stories because together, hand in hand, we can navigate this difficult terrain and emerge stronger on the other side. Links: https://www.cruse.org.uk/ https://www.bluecross.org.uk/pet-bereavement-and-pet-loss https://www.bereavementandbeyond.co.uk/The End of the Line by The Traveling Wilburys https://youtu.be/UMVjToYOjbM?si=WCc8anKmi_XKAGqn Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
My guest Gabriella Mitchell started Scattered Blooms in April 2023 creating bespoke seed hearts, providing a unique way to say goodbye to a loved one or beloved pet.After experiencing loss herself, she became aware of what was available to those bereaved. Having had a tribute ring made from the ashes of her grandfather Pop’s to whom she was very close, she was also well aware of the financial implications of many of the options available.Being a lover of nature, she enjoys getting out into the garden with her boys and her oldest especially loves to see when new flowers bloom and is fascinated by the insects and creatures that they bring into the garden. In more recent times, Gabriella lost another grandfather and started looking for a way to also commemorate him, whilst being mindful of the environment, and trying to find something significant at a more modest cost, the idea of seed hearts came into being.www.scatteredblooms.co.uk Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
My guest today is Jane Duncan Rogers who helps people prepare well for a good end of life. Jane has been in the field of psychotherapy and personal growth for many years. She is the founder of, Before I Go Solutions, and she is dedicated to educating people about dying, death, and grief. She is also a published author, and she has an amazing TED talk which I highly recommend my listeners check out.After the death of her husband, Jane discovered just how complex, confusing and challenging things can be for those left behind. She has used the pain of her own experience to help guide others.Her book, Gifted By Grief, was published in 2015 followed by, Before I Go: The Essential Guide to Creating a Good End of Life Plan. It, along with the accompanying Workbook, is the basis for all her programmes.For more information about Jane and her products, check out her website. https://beforeigosolutions.com/References:The Grief Recovery MethodLouise Hay – You Can Heal Your Life  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Grief is one of the most excruciating experiences a person can endure. However, within the midst of this overwhelming pain and confusion, lies an opportunity to transform this darkness into a beacon of light by offering support to others who are also grieving. My guest today Kelly Higgs is one of those people. She is a special needs teacher and the founder of Time To Heal Together.Within her business, Time To Heal Together, Kelly uses her skills as a qualified Advanced Drawing and Talking Practitioner to support children, young people and adults to process their painful memories and emotions in a safe way. It can be particularly helpful for people who are experiencing anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, isolation, bereavement, trauma, family separation, the impact of special educational needs.As a child Kelly witnessed her mum's mental health difficulties and then at the age of 15 her mum died from a brain tumour. These experiences created a passion in Kelly for supporting others with their emotional well-being.Kelly has kindly offered half price sessions to anyone who has listened to this episode. Email Kelly – kelly.higss84@gmail.comJoin her Facebook group Time to Heal Together https://www.facebook.com/search/top?q=time%20to%20heal%20togetherhttps://www.acorns.org.uk/https://linktr.ee/louisebates Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Today I am talking to my husband Bill about his experience of grief after the death of our son Matthew. Bill admits that he doesn’t like to talk about grief usually, but he felt inspired to share on this occasion after listening to other guests on my podcast.Bill has not had any therapy and has decided to bury his grief in a box, in a big hole, covered in a thick layer of concrete. Bill’s advice for others though is to not do it like him! He uses dark humour to deal with most of life’s experiences and grief is no exception. Burying grief is not a strategy I would recommend but it’s important to remember that we do not judge how other people grieve.When it comes to grieving, men and women often exhibit different patterns of coping and expressing their emotions. While these differences are by no means universal, they do tend to reflect general societal expectations, conditioning and gender roles that have been ingrained over time. For example, men may feel pressured to adopt a stoic behaviour and suppress their feelings as a way of upholding traditional notions of masculinity. Consequently, they might be more inclined to isolate themselves or engage in activities that distract them from the pain. On the other hand, women are generally encouraged to be more openly emotional and seek support from others during times of grief. This can manifest in sharing their feelings with friends or family members, seeking therapy or counselling, or participating in support groups. It is important to remember, however, that these differences are not absolute, and individuals may vary greatly in their grieving styles regardless of gender.Bottling up your feelings or burying emotions can lead to all sorts of anxiety, depression, and even physical health issues. Allow yourself the space and time to feel what you need to feel - cry if you want, punch a pillow if it helps! Find healthy outlets like talking to a friend or therapist. Feeling is healing.Acknowledging your emotions is the first step towards healing and finding true emotional well-being.Recommended reading:Letters to Matthew by Louise Bates, which include the poems as discussed in this episode: Shipwreck by G. Snow & The Twins Parable by Pablo Molinero.Matthew's albums:Fightback by Matt BatesKaleidoscope by Matt BatesLouise Bates Links Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Discover how the funeral industry is evolving and why traditional practices may no longer suit everyone. Explore the latest trends, alternatives, and options available to honour your loved ones in a more personalized and meaningful way. My guest today is Kate Tym and I love her enthusiasm and humour when it comes to talking about funerals. This is a fascinating episode which has really made me think about how I want people to celebrate my life when I die. The traditional funeral, with its sombre atmosphere and black attire, is slowly evolving into a more personalized and casual experience. People are moving away from rigid religious ceremonies towards celebrations of life that truly reflect the individuality of the person who has died. Picture this - instead of mournful hymns a sing-a-long, the family dog in attendance and a toast raised to say goodbye. The celebration of life can be separated from the burial or cremation, freeing you up to hold your farewelling in any setting you like, with no time restrictions and atmospherically very different to a church or crematorium send-off. In short, these changing trends indicate a shift towards embracing life even when faced with death – because after all, it's about celebrating someone's journey rather than mourning their departure.  For more information about Kate and what she does, check out her website here: https://coffinclub.co.uk/https://linktr.ee/louisebates Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
In this episode I talk to Janice Thompson who works with clients going through grief. We are both practitioners in a technique called Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) and Matrix Reimprinting, commonly known as Tapping Therapy. In this episode we discuss how this technique also supported us in our own personal grief.Tapping Therapy is a therapeutic practice that combines elements of talk therapy with acupuncture and energy medicine. It involves tapping on certain acupressure points on the body while verbalizing specific statements related to the problem or issue at hand. This process helps to regulate the body's energy system and release blockages that can contribute to emotional distress or physical ailments. Tapping Therapy is a very gentle technique and ideal to support people going through grief.Janice has used the pain of her own grief to help others and I highly recommend her book, ‘Joy Beyond Grief’ to my clients because I appreciate how much it helped me in my journey.For more information about Janice and the topics we discussed in this episode, check out the links below.Janice's WebsiteJanice's Book - Joy Beyond GriefLouise Bates LinksEFT Tapping Therapy infoSue Ryder Grief Support Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Today my guest Ashley Griffiths talks about the grief he felt over the sudden death of his sister Abi. As the conversation opens up, he explains how he was estranged from Abi and how it complicated his grief.When it comes to grieving the loss of an estranged sibling or loved one, the pain can be uniquely complex. It's not only the grief over their physical departure but also the mourning of a relationship that never had a chance to fully mend. The emotions may range from deep sadness and regret to confusion and anger. We find ourselves questioning what could have been different, what we could have done to bridge the gap between us. In many ways, this type of loss is accompanied by waves of guilt and unresolved feelings that can take years, even decades, to process. While society often romanticizes about family bonds, it's important to acknowledge that sometimes relationships break down irreparably due to circumstances beyond our control. Grieving an estranged sibling or loved one involves embracing the complexity of these emotions and finding solace in cherishing the memories we did have instead of dwelling on what could have been.We also discuss generational conditioning and how men are told to be strong and not cry. Phrases like, big boys don't cry and don't be like a girl, do not help the cause. SUDEP (Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy)Connect with Ashley in LinkedInAshley's InstagramWe discussed the teaching of Brene Brown and Gabor Mate.Check out their books.They also have lots of free info on YouTube and various other social network sites.Louise Bates Links Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Grief is a universal experience that impacts individuals in diverse ways, and this holds true for individuals on the autistic spectrum as well. Autism presents unique challenges in how emotions are understood, expressed, and processed, which can significantly influence the experience of grief. The intersection of autism and grief requires careful attention and understanding to provide appropriate support and guidance for autistic individuals navigating loss. Sally is autistic and ADHD and works as a psychotherapist, counsellor, hypnotherapist and mentor for clients who are, or think they may be neurodivergent. She is a public speaker and advocate for neurodivergence and hosts a podcast on this topic. Sally is a radio presenter, with a show called, Love Your Mind on Frome fm. Her show is dedicated to mental health and neurodiversity. Sally is promoting neurodivergent psychotherapy, counselling and coaching by building awareness of the benefits of neurodivergent professionals within the mental health sector. She is a contributor, on a book project being written by autistic therapists, for neurodivergent therapists and the wider neurodiversity community.I resonate a lot with what Sally shares and it's making me question whether I flutter on the edges of being neurodivergent. Getting to understand myself at a deeper level is a good thing and helps me to be a better version of myself - and aren't we all always a work in progress anyway? This episode is fascinating and I love how Sally describes her thoughts and experience of grief. This will help so many people going through grief who's journeys may be similar.Sally's podcastLouise Bates Links Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Ep 8 - Finding Your Flow

Ep 8 - Finding Your Flow

2023-09-2601:17:16

My guest today is Rachel Leigh Janney. Listen as she bravely shares her experience of stillbirth in 2019 with her daughter Narayan. Rachel explains that before Narayan was born, she had a fear and a lot of anxiety about what it would be like if someone close to her died. A month before she became pregnant, she heard someone say, "Who are we to choose how long a soul lives for?" This marked the beginning of her deep relationship with her daughter Narayan and her journey to supporting others through their grief.Rachel explains how Narayan was stillborn at nearly 7 months, and how no one asked her about the birth story. She believes that we are conditioned to avoid talking about grief, and she wants to change this. Today, this podcast provides Rachel with the opportunity to talk about her daughter and the beautiful water birth experience, where Narayan was born in her water sac.Rachels questions if we could find gratitude in the journey of grief and if we could recognize the magic moments scattered throughout this difficult journey? Events like this have the power to enrich our lives. Rachel believes that we have the ability to choose the meaning of this change in our lives. The stillbirth of her daughter grounded her, gave her confidence, conviction, and gratitude that were missing before. Could the experience of grief bring the deeper connection to life that we have been missing?We also talk about glimmer moments which are micro moments of happiness. None of us choose the journey of grief but we can choose to look for the glimmer moments.Recommended reading:On Grief and Grieving by Elizabeth kubler RossOn Death and Dying by Elizabeth kubler RossDying Into Life: The Yoga of Death, Loss and TransformationWe Were Gonna Have a Baby, But We Had an Angel Instead by Pat SchwiebertAsk Me His Name by Elle WrightThe AKAL Meditation (Akal is a mantra to help with the transition of a passing soul. Typically chanted 5 times or more to honour the departed soul and all who are connected to the soul. A beautiful mantra to aid with the grieving process)Louise Bates Links Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Ep 7 - Don't Look Down

Ep 7 - Don't Look Down

2023-09-1901:11:36

My guest today is Louise Bennett whose son Fred died aged 14 from leukaemia. Louise arrives with her dog Dustin who may be heard moving around in the background, but he brings a lot of love and licks into the studio.Losing a child is undoubtedly one of the most devastating experiences a parent can endure, no matter the child's age. However, when it comes to losing a young child, the dynamic of grief takes on a distinct set of challenges. The dreams and aspirations that were once filled with the promise of their future suddenly become shattered hopes, leaving parents grappling with an overwhelming sense of emptiness and incompleteness. Moreover, the loss feels unjust as these young lives are often seen as innocent and untainted by the complexities and hardships of the world. The absence of their laughter, hugs, and milestones creates an irreplaceable void that forever haunts parents' hearts. In this way, understanding this intricate aspect of child loss becomes paramount in providing support and empathy to grieving families navigating through unimaginable grief. Louise writes on her blog, www.blanketsandbiscuits.com and is currently writing her first book.Writing has always been her passion, and she has found it a vital way to come to terms with her grief and to find a way forward.  She set up Fred Bennett’s Don’t Look Down, a special named fund with the Children’s Cancer and Leukaemia Group, to raise funds for research into ALL, which is about to break the £100,000 fundraising mark.She has written articles on grief for the Huffington Post and the New Statesman, and appeared as a contributor on Newsnight, BBC Breakfast, Good Morning Britain, ITV News, Sky News and Global radio. By day, she runs Armadillo Social, a marketing and training agency. Louise’s cancer charity: www.dontlookdown.org.ukLouise’s Web: www.blanketsandbiscuits.com Recommended readingIt’s okay that you’re not okay by Megan DivineIt’s The Year Of Magical Thinking, by Joan DidionSeptember is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, so it is timely that we talk about child loss and cancer today.Louise Bates Links#ChildhoodCancerAwarenessMonth#CCAM#ChildhoodCancer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Trigger warning!In today’s episode we are talking about suicide and bereavement by suicide. This can be a very emotive subject so if you feel this may be too difficult for you to listen to, please feel free to tune into a different episode. There are links below to various organisations if you feel you need to talk to somebody afterwards. You will also find links to other topics we discuss.Today I am honoured to have Charlie Hart as my guest. Charlie has personally experienced the tragic loss of her son Iggy in April 2019 aged 15 to suicide. There is a vast difference between normal death and death by suicide, but Charlie has reassured me that she finds talking about her experience very cathartic.Iggy was obsessed with cars. He wanted to be a mechanical engineer when he grew up and was planning his work experience with a car mechanic.Talking about Iggy not only keeps his memory alive, but it hopefully reaches others out there who have been touched by the tragedy of suicide.Charlie Hart (she/they) is a qualified, experienced HR Analyst and Inclusion Consultant. Charlie identifies as a ‘Queer AuDHDer’, as she is bisexual, autistic and has ADHD. An enthusiastic and passionate public speaker, Charlie’s specialist subjects are ‘neurodiversity’ understanding and acceptance, fostering a culture of inclusion, belonging and psychological safety in the workplace, and ‘intersectionality’ - especially the ‘double rainbow’ intersection (people on both the autistic spectrum and the LGBTQIA+ spectrum). Charlie is a social media influencer and neurodiversity advocate under the persona Ausome Charlie.I hope this episode helps to break down the stigma surrounding suicide and the outdated language that is still used. We need to support those who are struggling with bereavement by suicide. Society needs to hear these conversations. We need to become more grief literate particularly in this very delicate area.Survivors of Bereavement by Suicide (SOBS) support grouphttps://uksobs.org/AIM for the Rainbow (the queer corner of Autistic Inclusive Meets)Introduction to Iggy’s Initiative:Introduction – AIM for the Rainbow (rainbowaim.com)Helplines If You Need Help – AIM for the Rainbow (rainbowaim.com)SHOUT Crisis Text Service:Shout - UK's 24/7 Crisis Text Service for Mental Health Support | Shout 85258 (giveusashout.org)Because many people, especially social anxious and autistic young people, do not like making phone calls. This is like the Samaritans but you can text them, too.Ausome Charlie blogs, some of which talk about grief and CPTSD:www.ausomecharlie.comhttps://charlieausomehart.wordpress.com/2021/01/25/iggys-initiative-introduction/Louise Bates Links Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Losing your husband who is also your best friend and soul mate is like having a piece of your heart ripped out. It's not just the daily companionship, but the deep connection you shared that can never be replicated or replaced. When they're gone, a void settles in that lingers indefinitely. Even the most mundane activities become reminders of what once was, laughing until your stomach hurt or finishing each other's sentences. Their absence leaves an emptiness that no amount of distractions can fill. Grief transforms from sharp pain to a dull ache, always lurking beneath the surface. Coping strategies may help you navigate the grieving process, but the indelible impact left by their departure means accepting that life will never be quite as colourful or cherished as when experienced with them by your side. Hazel Carter, from Solihull, was born in North Devon. Eldest of 5 children in a working class family she started employment at age 16. Over 40 years she worked her way up to director level in financial services. Hazel gave up here job in 2018 to care for her terminally ill husband. When he died just before Covid, Hazel took all her journals, and her husband’s laptop and began to write an inspirational, educational book of love and courage. Hazel’s book – Life’s Good, it’s the disease that the problem - is only available from https://lifesgoodbook.co.uk as she is donating 100% of all sales revenue to MND Association, Marie Curie and the Myton Hospices. In addition to being a self-published author Hazel regularly gives talks about staying positive when faced with lives worst challenges. Hazel is a volunteer at Marie Curie hospice and on the Board of Trustees for MND Association. In the summer of 2022, she donated a kidney to save the life of her brother. In March 2023 Hazel won Inspirational Author award, from Ladies First Professional Development network and was a finalist for the Inspirational Woman award. This episode is a captivating blend of tears and laughter, designed to inspire, support, and uplift the listener.Books recommended by Hazel in this podcast -  A Widow's Journey: Reflections on Walking Alone, by Gayle G. Roper - The Gift of Peace: Thoughts for a Peaceful World, by Brahma Kumari - A Gift For Grief; by Louise BatesLouise Bates Links Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Ep 4 - Sibling Loss

Ep 4 - Sibling Loss

2023-08-2901:03:22

Siblings often have unique bonds and connections that nobody else can understand. They grow up together, share childhood memories, and navigate through life side by side. Losing a sibling means losing not just a family member but also a confidante and lifelong companion. So why does it seem like we don't give enough weight to this kind of loss? Maybe it's time we start recognizing the immense pain that comes with losing a brother or sister and offer more support to those grieving such a significant loss. In today’s episode I talk to my daughter, Piper Bates, about her experience of grief following the loss of her younger brother, Matthew. This episode is filled with both tears and laughter as we delve into his diagnosis and how Piper's relationship with Matthew evolved as his health deteriorated. We also touch upon the concept of anticipatory grief, which refers to the grief that begins before a person dies. During our conversation, we opened up about the overwhelming guilt we experienced after Matthew's death. It was hard to admit, but that night, we both had the best night's sleep we'd had in weeks, and a strange sense of relief washed over us. However, what came next was a tidal wave of conflicting emotions that completely engulfed us. It's interesting how nobody really talks about that initial relief or the guilt that follows. Piper opens up about the range of emotions she went through, the sense of isolation she felt, and how it affected her overall mental well-being. She even shares her profound thoughts on the afterlife, admitting that despite considering herself a bad atheist, the belief in something greater brings her comfort. Sibling loss is a topic that is often overlooked, which is why I am incredibly proud of this episode. Not only does it help keep Matthew's memory alive, but I'm confident it will also provide solace to others who have experienced the loss of a sibling.Books discussed in this episode - Grief is the thing with feathers by Max Porter / With death in mind by Kathryn MannixLouise Bates Links Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Ep 3- Our Light Inside

Ep 3- Our Light Inside

2023-08-2241:52

Grief and loss can often become a driving force for some people to make a positive impact on others. Some people take the pain they've experienced themselves and channel it into something practical, with the hope of helping others who might be going through something similar. Deep grief is undoubtedly one of the most agonizing experiences anyone can endure. Yet, amidst the crushing pain and confusion, there lies an opportunity to transform this darkness into a source of light by helping others who are navigating through similar grief.After the suicide of a great friend, Dayle founded ‘Our Light Inside’. This service allows people to digitally document information, memories and messages which can then be passed to their loved ones when they die. The idea is for them to gift information to support their families through the loss and grief.Dayle’s Mum has Lewy Body Dementia which is very fast acting and watching her lose mental and physical abilities showed the need to plan for end of life in addition to post death. To support the expansion of Our Light Inside to cover dying, death, loss and grief, Dayle is also training in 'End Of Life Facilitation'. Dayle has directed the pain of her grief in a practical way by creating ‘Our Light Inside’. This service will help people positively plan their end of life, but you don’t need to wait for a diagnosis or old age – you can sign up now while you are fit and healthy!We also talk about anticipatory grief and mediumship. Buckle in and enjoy the ride. For more information about what we discussed please check out the following links:https://ourlightinside.com/Louise Bates Links Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Ep 2 - Hidden Strength

Ep 2 - Hidden Strength

2023-08-1550:44

Losing your husband suddenly is an unimaginable tragedy that can leave you feeling utterly devastated and lost. In these heart-wrenching moments, it's important to remember to take things one step at a time. Initially, you may find yourself dealing with overwhelming shock and disbelief, unable to fully comprehend the weight of the situation. Surrounding yourself with a support system of friends and family who can provide comfort and guidance during this difficult time is crucial. Task-oriented activities such as planning a memorial service or handling legal matters might demand your immediate attention, but don't forget to prioritize self-care too; give yourself permission to grieve, rest, and heal. Allow the grieving process to unfold naturally, honouring your husband's memory while gradually finding ways to navigate a new life.Nineteen years ago, Tracey’s husband Tony died suddenly while on a golfing holiday in Spain with his friends and colleagues. Tracey not only had her own grief and shock to contend with, but she also had to break the news to her two gorgeous boys. Today she bravely talks about that dark period in her life and how she navigated her way through.Tracey is now a certified grief recovery specialist and the founder of surviving bereavement – life after loss, organising pop up bereavement cafes to support people going through grief and loss.In 2019 Tracey became a published author with her book Hidden Strength. On top of all this, she is also the director of Ladies First Professional Development Ltd. This year she is the proud winner of - networker of the year.There are tears and laughter in today’s episode.For more information about what we discussed please check out these links:https://survivingbereavement.com/https://www.griefrecoverymethod.com/Louise Bates Links Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Ep 1 - My Story

Ep 1 - My Story

2023-08-0812:58

In this episode, I will be sharing a deeply personal and heart-wrenching story around the loss of my beloved son Matthew. The overwhelming grief that followed Matthew’s death completely altered the course of my life. However, through my own experiences and the valuable insights I gained, I have discovered a newfound passion for assisting others as they navigate their own grief journeys. This has led me to write two books about grief and now embark on this incredible podcast journey.By sharing my story, I hope to create an environment where others feel comfortable opening up about their own grief. I understand that grief is a complex and challenging topic, often making it difficult for individuals to openly discuss and express their emotions in a genuine and meaningful manner, but I have always been an over sharer! My goal is to establish a safe and supportive space where vulnerability and transparency are not only accepted but embraced.I am fully committed to my mission of helping society become more grief literate. I believe these conversations surrounding grief need to be heard in order for others to learn how to engage in them. By shedding light on this often overlooked aspect of life, I aim to educate and raise awareness, ultimately fostering a more compassionate and understanding society.Join me on this podcast journey as we delve into the depths of grief, sharing stories, insights, and lessons that will undoubtedly touch your heart, broaden your perspective and hopefully loosen your grief. Together, we can navigate the complexities of grief and find solace in the power of shared experiences.Louise Bates Links Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
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