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Audiogyan

Audiogyan

Author: Audiogyan

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A podcast for people interested in Art, Design and Philosophy.
Audiogyan is an attempt to audio document knowledge, ideas and thoughts of people who have devoted their life in the field of performing arts, design or philosophy. It is a genuine attempt document and create a pool of content which can be useful for future generations to come. The podcast is mainly for Indian audience and interviews are also of Indian people.
141 Episodes
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Audiogyan is DesignUp’s podcast partner. It’s one of a kind Design-in-Tech conference happening on 15th and 16th Nov 2019 in Bangalore. Visit https://designup.io/blr2019/ for more details. Today I have Sidharth Rao with us on Audiogyan. Other than being an agency CEO, he's an angel investor and serial entrepreneur. You can find a lot about how to be an entrepreneur and what mistakes big CEOs made and more in his recently launched a book called “How I almost blew it”. We will be speaking about that in the later part of the episode but more importantly we will also try and explore where do award winning ideas come from and how critical it is for the founder to be creatively minded than just a business man?QuestionsYou have been creating award winning campaigns ideas since 2003 with Chidiya Udi which you did for MakeMyTrip. What according to you is an “idea"? How has that definition evolved in last 20 years? Is it just a kick to do something out of the box or genuinely looking for a gap and mitigate with not-so-traditional fixes? It is said that ideas are cheap. We also find that lot of entrepreneurs say, idea is 1%, execution is 99%. What is your take on that? Winning Abbys, afaqs and other Indian advertising awards is one and winning Cannes is something else. What new got added or updated in your creative thinking to make it to the international level advertising awards? How have your ideas and ways to communicate changed due to digital penetration in India? From making Viral videos for MMT and Rediff to Swiggy's, Voice of Hunger? What is transpiring across through this evolution? When Webchutney was young and rebellious, I remember you carried a tag line “did it!” Where you openly declared that we just did it. What will this Sid say now? I am pointing to the young but relatively mature Webchutney? Is it always necessary to be young in the advertising world? Only young people get ideas? How critical is for a founder / CEO / entrepreneur to be creative than just being a business man and spotting growth opportunities? Is it an inherent quality or one has to keep him or herself re-inventing for growth? This stems from your chapter with Kunal Shah. Sometimes it’s best to get a CEO than force fitting the founder to be the CEO. You also often said that I am more of a founder than CEO. Has that opinion changed? Can you share any examples which you stumbled upon while doing research for your book, where the company stood out differently than just doing pure business or service, since the founders were creative and had more to offer? Of course in the Indian context What made you publish this book? I am sure it’s not sharing experience. There is something more to it like answering back few unanswered or stupid questions which were thrown at you or may be more… What say?
Each frame, each moment, we record the world around us through our senses. We experience the warmth of light through a window, the dashing of elevator doors in our hallway, the texture of a handrail, the aroma of something cooking in the kitchen. In P.L.Deshpande’s words, When we hear the word Thalipeeth, we not only just remember a peculiar maharashtrian dish made by Grandmom but we also remember her bangles clinging while Doughing the flour, freshly made white butter, the kitchen where we sat and ate it and countless other memories. These senses create the full experience of the spaces we inhabit. Rohan Shivkumar has been trying to capture these moments, cacophonies, their contradictions, paradoxes and more through his architectural films. Today I have Rohan Shivkumar with us on Audiogyan. Rohan is an architect, urban designer and filmmaker practicing in Mumbai. He is the Dean of Research and Academic Development at the Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute for Architecture and Environmental Studies. His work ranges from architecture, urban research and consultancy projects to works in film and visual art. He is interested in issues concerning housing, public space and in exploring the many ways of reading and representing the city. Today, we will try and document, what does it take to create space or a moments in time on a film You have made 2 films so far, “Nostalgia of the Future” & “Lovely Villa”. I recently watched both of them at Frame Conclave in Goa. Very nice indeed. In both of your films you are trying to show connections and also dissociation between the matter (which is architecture) and soul (which are memories and intangible feelings associated). Can you start by briefly telling us what are these films and what made you do these films?   Something within you (as an architect) is not able to manifest in the form of architecture. Probably that could be the reason you made these films? Is there a common or individual subtext you are trying to communicate through these 2 films? What is that subtext? Filmmaking is a much younger art form than architecture. We daily walk pass the same building but hardly pay attention to the details or art deco of it. But when a film captures that and presents it, it feels great. Is it failure of the architect to show us those beauty spots or victory of film making as an art form? Is invisible architecture great architecture? What is the biggest challenge to encapsulate the micro and and macro of architecture on the film? This is in context of Correa’s vision for "a mirror of the nation, in miniature” - If you at all tried to portray that in you film, what was the process like? Both of your films have long takes with steady shots. Without much camera panning and moving. Is this standard for more or less architecture films? You have intentionally taken this route? What are your thoughts and learning? Lastly, I would like to conclude by asking, what is Project Cinema City? Can you tell us more about it? What we do as regular citizens?
Today I have Sarover Zaidi with us on Audiogyan. She is a philosopher and social anthropologist. Sarovar has worked extensively on the religious architecture of the Jews, Muslims and Christians in the port cities of Bombay and Kochi. She has previously worked in rural public health, across India,  Has huge body of work in collecting Islamic & Hindu iconography across South East Asia. She currently teaches at School of Planning and Architecture, Delhi, and Jindal School of Art & Architecture, Sonipat. And today we are here to explore the world of colours and what do they mean in individual contexts. Thank you Sarovar for giving your time and it’s a real honour to have you on Audiogyan. Welcome to the show. How do colours become part of our culture? Can you share some examples from your study? How do communities establish their colour? How is it carried forward by generations? What is possibly Mumbai’s colour? How did you arrive at it? If you can share any case study? Why is Lal Qila, Lal? Is it just using local resources while it was built or has some reasons for it being Lal? How deep is the connection between modern take on "psychology of colours" with actual traditions in India?
I am so honoured and privilege to listen to great master without any microphones in his house in Panvel, Mumbai. I am keeping his introduction short for those who don’t know him. He is a Rudra Veena Player. A sangeet natak academy award winner in 2012 and a 20th generation of Dagar lineage, referring to Swami Haridas Dagaur of the 13th century I would like to start by asking the most fundamental question which you answered in one of your interview online - "A beenkar must never be in a hurry" - Can you please explain this thought. Is it possible in today’s time to play traditional Dhrupad and still make it appealing to attract more listeners? How do you ensure that the purity is maintained and yet it engages new age audience? In one of your interview you mentioned, "there are no elders left to criticise the nonsense we play” - How do you ensure the quality is maintained? In today’s noisy day and age, people really don’t have reference point to understand what is good and what is great. How do you maintain integrity? I would like to mention one quote from you interview published in Darbar.org - “Learning is not just the technique. It has to be a way of life” - Can you tell us what do you mean by this? In one more reference to you interviews online, you said, “We cannot compromise with the instrument’s rituals even if we die of hunger” - Where does this passion come from?
Today I have Meetu Akali with us on Audiogyan. She is the founder of Studio Momo, an environmentally conscious Architecture & Interior design firm, specialising in luxury villas and the restoration of Indo-Portuguese homes of Goa. Studio Momo is based in Goa. Meetu is an architects who lived and studied in Oxford before moving to Goa.Can you tell a bit about your experience at Oxford and how did your education helped in navigating you profession? What are the unique characteristics of Goan architecture and interior? Which all things have shaped it’s look, form and feel apart from Indo-Portuguese influence? What was the character to it’s architectural landscape before the colonial period? Studio Momo is inspired by Wabi Sabi Philosophy. Is it because Goa is a sea destination where time wears out things quickly? Was Wabi Sabi a conscious effort because you like it or was it a discovery as the destination demands it? You have few eco-products. Can you tell us more about it? Why these products and how do you use it in your sites? Your thoughts on going eco friendly especially in Goa. Can you share any particular case study and your learnings from any of your site. For eg: Villa Chorao. A simple but powerful learning which has changed your perspective towards interior design or architecture Studio Momo does both architecture and interior design (I understand, not necessarily for all the sites all the time). But if I can put is crudely as Apple - where you do both hardware and software. Apple certainly has advantage. What are your advantage areas of doing both?
Mohi Baha'ud-din Dagar is a Rudra Veena Player. A sangeet natak academy award winner in 2012 and a 20th generation of Dagar lineage, referring to Swami Haridas Dagur of the 13th century.Just to set context, there are almost 11 types of Veena. It is said that Rudra Veena is king of Instruments and all string instruments are shaped from it. Can you share any of it’s mythological and historical aspect? I was going through your website which mentions, stage and mic requirements for a small baithak to a large concert. Can you tell demands of this instrument and why? Asad Ali Khan once said, "Kalakar isse nahi bajata, ye kalakar se bajwata hai” - Can you tell us what is so rahasyamay about this Rudra Veena? Can you tell us challenges of making and playing a Veena. It takes 6 to 7 months to make a Veena. It has challenges since it’s made as per the size of there person. Also it’s tuning before playing is a big task in itself. In fact in one of your interviews, you have said, Veena is a like and elephant. What is so intense about it? What is that silence playing even after plucking of the strings have stopped? It is very peculiar to string instruments as oppose to percussion or wind instruments. Rudra Veena has been with us since Rigveda and Samaveda, or lets call it Satya-yuga. What is the long term future of Veena (Rudra) in Kali-yuga ?
Ravi Poovaiah, Professor, at IDC, IIT Mumbai. His current pedagogy as well as research and design interests are in fields related to Interaction Design, New Media Design, Visual Design and Product Design. Most of the things about him are documented on IIT IDC website. Ravi sir is one of the most loved professor at IDC and I got a chance to interact with him during a 3 day workshop at IIT. Product Expo. Many years ago. Although he has a huge body of work in almost all aspects of Visual and communication design, I was very impressed with one of his projects called Trinetra; a collection of Indian glyphs and icons. I call it a Indian Noun project. So this Audiogyan tries and document some aspects about Communication design but more importantly and a personal curiosity of how are signages designed? Especially in India.What is a signage system? What is the importance of a well designed Signage system? What is the state of Signages in India? Where do we stand if we compare with other countries? What are the challenges while designing a Signage system for India? Language, material, Population, position w.r.t space etc... What are peculiar things to be understood while designing signage system for India? Can you tell us what is Trinetra project / tool about? What your thoughts on the future of Signage system in India? How can corporates or independent designers contribute to Signages in India?
Kimya is a type designer from Mumbai with a passionate interest in Indic type design. Kimya interned with Linotype GmbH, Germany, in their font design department in 2010. Over the next several years she worked as a freelance designer for numerous type foundries catering to their multi-script requirements. Since 2015 she’s been a partner at Mota Italic focusing on Indic and Latin designs for retail and custom corporate projects.How has new technology and new software along with OpenType features, changing the face of Type design for Indian scripts? What has now become possible due to advancing technology? You engage yourself in educating about type design. What are your observations about it? You have been promoting and teaching importance of Indian typefaces, why? What value you see in it? How do you see things changing if type Design or taught in school and other primary educations institutes?We all know about the famous Oscar blunder due to bad typography. It’s not end of the world when it comes to Oscar, but its life and death when it comes to medicine and other important areas. Do you think better fonts can make a difference or it’s just better typography? What are your thoughts and long term vision w.r.t spreading awareness about Indian Typefaces? How you and Mota are working towards it? You have been working on 3D type faces recently. Can you tell us more about it?
Today I have Denzil Smith us on Audiogyan. Denzil is an Indian film and stage actor, producer and is known for his stage and screen roles as a character actor. He has a long-standing association with both Motley Productions and PrimeTime Theatre. He has a huge body of work from working in Bollywood films, to theatre, from television to being a voice artist and more. Today we are here to discover his a relatively less know side which is love for music, especially Jazz. He has been host for jazz festivals, concerts at NCPA, Bluefrog and more…I am a Hindustani classical listener and I see a lot of similarities between Jazz and Hindustani Classical - which has to do with concepts of solo expression and the links between composition and improvisation. So I want to ask how would you define Jazz? What all components constitute Jazz? What according to you could be the reason why Jazz was so quickly adapted by Indians? Did it have anything to do with social position of Indian in 1920’s or just because talented people like Leon Abbey, Chic Chocolate and others who influenced other people at that time?Can you tell us something about Bombay Jazz Club?Who are few of the all-time-top Jazz Indian artists whose music is available online to buy or stream? The era from the 1930s to the 1950s is often called as the golden age of jazz in India. Did Jazz play any role in freedom struggle of India?What is the future of Jazz in India?
Sameep Padora is a practicing architect and principal of the design studio sP+a in Mumbai. Sameep is in a pursuit and encouragement of sustainable, contextual and innovative practices that arise ‘from a site itself’. He received his diploma in architecture from Academy of Architecture went on to study at SCI-Arc in Los Angeles, and received his Masters from the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University in 2005.  He is a member of the Academic Councils of a number of schools and is a member of the National Technical Committee of Habitat for Humanity, India. And today we are here to discuss his approach towards context in the world of architectureCan you start by telling us your broad areas of work? How does your practise work in case of commissioned projects?Can you share any particular case study of yours where you dealt with latent local resources and built things?What are your observation w.r.t Human Resources / labour in urban India & then rural India?How do you practise "good amount of" research time for a particular site / project in this competitive world?What would be your top 3 suggestions to the upcoming world of designers and architects (Of India) to keep in mind the world of 2050 and then design?
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Comments (15)

mukunda raju

nice pod cast

Aug 20th
Reply

surendhar svs

more architecture talks would be nice

May 27th
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Shiva Lakshmanan

This is my first time in audiogyan. As an architect, I love the topics covered. Also, this is the first podcast where the anchor is an "active" listener. Keep up the good work.

May 21st
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Apoorv

I think you should record the intro again if you mess up so much.

May 3rd
Reply

Rajiv Bv

Apoorv completely agree..

May 21st
Reply

Vinay Mantri

I really appreciate your episodes. Good job!

Feb 4th
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dhananjai pande

can't wait for the next episode. really insightful conversation and I am really looking forward for the books.

Jan 23rd
Reply

Siddharth Sawant

Great effort. Some suggestions - Let the guests speak freely. avoid interrupting them - Ask open ended questions i.e. less of yes/no questions - Do not lead. let the guests speak their mind. it may or may not align with your previously held beliefs. - Do not try and corroborate ideas across different interviews. difference of opinions between guests is what let's us see the world from multiple viewpoints. - Have a strategy for the conversation. what do you want the listeners to get out of the podcast? e.g. are you introducing them to the guest or are you introducing the field that they work in? - Please invest in better recording equipment, also some investment in sound processing software. I greatly appreciate the hardwork that went into creating this unique podcast. keep it up. best wishes :)

Nov 15th
Reply

Audiogyan

Siddharth Sawant Thanks a lot. Appreciate your feedback.

Nov 19th
Reply

Pratik keni

khup sundar 😊 fakt madhe madhe english bolaycha kami kela tr bara hoil

Oct 29th
Reply

Audiogyan

Pratik keni Sure. Noted. Thanks for the feedback.

Nov 6th
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suhrid sukumar

Just try to interrupt the speakers a little less.. With your umms.. And aahh.. And okss..

Oct 24th
Reply

Audiogyan

suhrid sukumar Sure. Noted. Thanks for the feedback.

Nov 6th
Reply

Dhruva Rathod

Was waiting for Podcasts in Indian context and Indian design community.Good to see that

Jul 28th
Reply

Deepak Teji

nice

Sep 18th
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