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News and news on the news. Slants, compromises, biases, praise, brickbats and 'news-views' mix ups, but crediting the devil where due. Here nothing is off limits. We say it like it is and appreciate others who do.
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He was booked for sexual harassment on the basis of a Facebook post by a Delhi student. To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
इस सप्ताह एनएल चर्चा में जो विषय शामिल हुए उनमें महात्मा गांधी की 150वीं जयंती पर प्रमुखता से चर्चा हुई. इसके अलावा पूर्वी उत्तर प्रदेश और बिहार के कुछ इलाकों में जाते हुए मानसून के कहर, बाढ़ के अलावा सुप्रीम कोर्ट द्वारा एससी-एसटी एक्ट में बदलाव को खारिज करने संबंधी आदेश और प्रधानमंत्री नरेंद्र मोदी द्वारा देश को खुले में शौच से मुक्त होने संबंधी घोषणा प्रमुखता से छायी रही. इस हफ्ते की चर्चा में खास मेहमान के रूप में मौजूद रहे दिल्ली यूनिवर्सिटी के हिंदू कॉलेज के प्रोफेसर रतनलाल और वरिष्ठ पत्रकार हर्षवर्धन त्रिपाठी. कार्यक्रम का संचालन न्यूज़लॉन्ड्री के कार्यकारी संपादक अतुल चौरसिया ने किया है. To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
Sunil Ambekar is a pracharak of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh and the national organising secretary of its student affiliate, the Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad. He has just published a book, The RSS: Roadmap for the 21st Century, which details the thought and organisational setup of the Sangh. In this second part of a two-part conversation with Newslaundry editor-in-chief Madhu Trehan, Ambekar explains the Sangh’s conception of Hindu Rashtra: “A nation that is inclusive and that guarantees no faith-based discrimination.” The imagination of Hindu Rashtra, he adds, includes all those who are born in this country, whose forefathers were from this country, and who contributed to the development of this country. Is there a place for dissent in Hindutva’s idea of the nation. “There is full place for dissent everywhere. Even in JNU. Even after the February 9 incident, everyone has continued to register dissent,” he responds, referring to a 2016 student protest at the Jawaharlal Nehru University that led to a government crackdown. Ambekar claims that India is the most tolerant of dissent right now. “To disagree in our country is the beauty of our democracy,” he says. Watch Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8F_zX8Un7Y To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
In this episode, we look at the lovefest between Donald Trump and Narendra Modi, and how it was reported on TV. We also look at how some of our TV news anchors derive their inspiration from Master Bobby. In other news, Republic TV has found an international bigot to add some, umm, worldly flavour to its programming. Watch. To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
Sunil Ambekar is a pracharak of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh and the national organising secretary of its student affiliate, the Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad. He has just published a book, The RSS: Roadmap for the 21st Century, which details the thought and organisational setup of the Sangh. Ambekar sat down with Newslaundry editor-in-chief Madhu Trehan to talk about the ideology of Hindutva and how it seeks to shape India. In this first part of a two-part conversation, he also speaks about what he claims is the lack of flexibility in feminism to account for diverse experiences, the Supreme Court’s judgement enabling women devotees to enter Kerala’s Sabarimala temple, the philosophy behind the Sangh’s martial arts training of its members. He argues that Hindutva is “a way of life”. “Sometimes, a person thinks about themselves and then thinks others are different,” he adds. “Our relationship is formed by knowing others. So, Hindutva is what teaches us to realise affinity with others. Thus, in this way it respects diversities.” He is dismayed by increasing divorce rates in the country and believes a change in the mindset of men is needed to address this. “The subject of our concern should be why this is happening,” he argues. “If family’s mindset is causing women to file divorce, then somewhere in society, the role of family and its members needs to be discussed. So, the Sangh is working on to revisit this.” To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
To preempt mass protests against its dismantling of Jammu and Kashmir’s autonomy, the Indian government put the Valley under a security lockdown and communications blackout. The lockdown, in place for over a month and a half now, has been so severe that even journalists have been finding it difficult to do their work. Not that it was easy to report from Kashmir before. Since the armed insurgency broke out in 1989, journalists covering the region have often had to negotiate tricky situations. In this series, “Reporting from Kashmir, 1989 to 1994”, Madhu Trehan and her former Newstrack colleagues Manoj Raghuvanshi and Alpana Kishore recount their time reporting from Kashmir, and what they learned from their experiences. Alpana recalls covering the Hazratbal Siege and the matter of what she describes as “feeding biryani to the terrorists”. The siege exemplified, she says, that “there is a place for deflating and calming down situations rather than going all guns blazing”. Manoj remembers interviewing K Doraiswamy, the Indian Oil official who had been abducted by Kashmiri militants and released in exchange for nine of their comrades. “Doraiswamy spoke a language that was shocking,” Manoj says, suggesting the official suffered from Stockholm Syndrome. “He said Azad Kashmir for PoK, etc.” At the time, Madhu recalls interviewing Sudhir Kakkar, a psychoanalyst at the University of Chicago, US, about Doraiswamy. Kakkar explained how captivity affects the psyche of a hostage. Madhu asks Alpana about interview of Mast Gul, the central figure in the Hazratbal Siege whom she describes as the “first Pakistani militant to be captured on camera in Kashmir”. Recalling her first encounter with Gul, Alpana says, “His chest was full of grenades. He was a flamboyant character, he thought he was a filmstar.” They talked about Gul’s “fight for Islam” and the militancy, she adds. Madhu, Alpana and Manoj share a laugh about how they were never honoured for their journalism by any government. “It’s honourable that none of us got any awards because we riled up every government that was in power and that’s our biggest award,” Madhu says. Reporting from Kashmir, 1989 to 1994 - Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vb34Ap2muJI Reporting from Kashmir, 1989 to 1994 - Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuBfzbD7lXE To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
NL Hafta has gone behind the paywall, but we love our listeners. So here's a little sneak peek into the complete episode. In this episode, Abhinandan, Raman, Manisha are joined by Joyjeet Das who is a Consulting Editor at Down to Earth magazine. The podcast begins with a discussion on the climate crisis and eventually comes to Swedish climate activist, Greta Thunberg. Joyjeet thinks her contribution has been a major contribution towards drawing public attention towards the cause. The panel also talks about the tragic incident where two Dalit children were beaten to death for open defecation. Apart from this, the panel also discusses media’s continued coverage of Howdy Modi. For more, listen up to the complete episode here: https://www.newslaundry.com/2019/09/28/hafta-243-climatestrike-howdymodi-and-more To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
इस सप्ताह एनएल चर्चा में जो विषय शामिल हुए उनमें अमेरिका में प्रधानमंत्री नरेंद्र मोदी का कार्यक्रम 'हाउडी मोदी', कश्मीर और भारत-पाक के संबंधों के ऊपर अमेरिकी राष्ट्रपति ट्रम्प का बयान, 16 साल की युवा कार्यकर्ता ग्रेटा थनबर्ग का भाषण, टेलीग्राफ के एडिटर द्वारा बाबुल सुप्रियो पर गाली गलौज का आरोप, शरद पवार को ईडी का नोटिस और हमारे सदी के महानायक अमिताभ बच्चन को दिया गया दादा साहब फाल्के सम्मान आदि विषय शामिल रहे. मध्य प्रदेश में दो दलित बच्चों को खुले में शौच करने की वजह से की गई हत्या पर विशेष चर्चा हुई. चर्चा में लेखक और पत्रकार अनिल यादव में साथ ही टेलीविजन पत्रकार स्मिता शर्मा भी शामिल हुए. कार्यक्रम का संचालन न्यूज़लॉन्ड्री के कार्यकारी संपादक अतुल चौरसिया ने किया है. To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
To preempt mass protests against its dismantling of Jammu and Kashmir’s autonomy, the Indian government put the Valley under a security lockdown and communications blackout. The lockdown, in place for over a month and a half now, has been so severe that even journalists have been finding it difficult to do their work. Not that it was easy to report from Kashmir before. Since the armed insurgency broke out in 1989, journalists covering the region have often had to negotiate tricky situations. In this series, “Reporting from Kashmir, 1989 to 1994”, Madhu Trehan and her former Newstrack colleagues Manoj Raghuvanshi and Alpana Kishore recount their time reporting from Kashmir, and what they learned from their experiences. Alpana remembers covering the Bharatiya Janata Party’s Ekta Yatra, or Unity March, to Srinagar in 1992. It turned out to be a farce, dogged by contradictory statements from BJP leaders, including Murli Manohar Joshi, then the party’s president, and Narendra Modi, a key organiser of the yatra. They claimed theirs would be a massive march, that they would not ask for security cover, that they would conclude the march by unfurling the Indian flag in Srinagar “in a celebratory manner with Kashmiris”. None of this came to pass. The flag was unfurled amidst a massive security cover and strict curfew. There was, of course, no celebration as the BJP leaders hurried back as soon as the flag was up. “In 13 minutes it was all over,” Alpana recalls. She remembers asking in her report, “What advice does the BJP president have to give to enthusiastic party workers and loyal supporters who were unceremoniously ditched at the last minute?” Alpana also recalls reporting on the abduction of some Kashmiri Pandits by the militants. She talks about the vulnerability of such hostages and the practice of exchange and negotiation between the militants and security officials. Stay tuned for the third part. Reporting from Kashmir, 1989 to 1994 - Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vb34Ap2muJI To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
This week, Prime Minister Narendra Modi turned 69 and TV news anchors couldn’t contain their excitement. A look at all the celebrations across channels. Special mention for India Today Group. To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
To preempt mass protests against its dismantling of Jammu and Kashmir’s autonomy, the Indian government put the Valley under a security lockdown and communications blackout. The lockdown, nearing a month and a half, has been so severe that even journalists have been finding it difficult to do their work. Not that it was easy to report from Kashmir before. Since the armed insurgency broke out in 1989, journalists covering the region have often had to negotiate tricky situations. In this series, “Reporting from Kashmir, 1989 to 1994”, Madhu Trehan and her former Newstrack colleagues Manoj Raghuvanshi and Alpana Kishore recount their time reporting from Kashmir, and what they learned from their experiences. “These two I would say are the ones in India and perhaps in the world who have done the most remarkable stories on Kashmir,” Madhu remarks, introducing her former colleagues. Manoj recalls that, on occasion, he had to risk his safety to record interviews and collect stories from Anantnag and Shopian in South Kashmir. “Shopian is a place where we almost got killed, twice,” he says. Among the stories he covered in the early years of the insurgency was the exodus of Kashmiri Pandits. He remembers interviewing Bitta Karate, a militant who was accused of killing Pandits and who told Manoj he could kill his own brother or mother if the situation so demanded. It became dangerous for Manoj to report from Kashmir, so his colleague, Alpana, took over. She tracked the rise of Hizbul Mujahideen, the strongest indigenous militant group in the Valley, and the shifting of the Kashmir movement’s focus “from Azadi to an Islamic jihad or radicalisation”. Stay tuned for the second part. To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
On August 22, Pawan Jaiswal, a journalist with Jansandesh Times in Uttar Pradesh, released a video showing schoolchildren at Siyur village in Mirzapur district being served a meagre meal of chapatti and salt for lunch. The political drama triggered by the expose has since subsided, the news cycle has moved on. But those caught in the storm are still living the consequences. Jaiswal is facing a case for “criminal conspiracy”. Rajkumar Pal, the village headman’s representative who had tipped off the journalist about the poor quality of midday meals at the Siyur school, remains under arrest, booked for “maligning the administration’s reputation”. While the Editors Guild of India has condemned the case against Jaiswal as a “classic case of shooting the messenger”, Pal’s arrest flies in the face of the state’s four-tier system for supervising the functioning of government schools, in accordance with the principle of decentralisation. The Village Education Committee, comprising panchayat representatives, sits at the bottom of this system and, among other functions, is meant to monitor the quality of midday meals. If the committee makes a complaint about the provision or quality of the meals, it is the responsibility of the state government to take action against the school authorities concerned. The Uttar Pradesh government’s response to the expose also calls into question the efficacy of its Interactive Voice Response system, which is supposedly designed to monitor midday meals in real time. In fact, government data shows Uttar Pradesh has logged the highest number of complaints of any state regarding the poor quality of midday meals from 2013 to 2016. Not surprisingly, the residents of Siyur are outraged. Pal’s wife Sushila complained that her husband was being punished for “performing his duty” as the representative of the village headman. Chameli Devi, a resident, claimed the quality of the meals had been poor for nearly a year. They complained about it to the headmaster, Murari Lal, but he didn’t pay any heed, saying the school could only provide whatever was available in the kitchen, she alleged. The school’s cook, Mamta, seemed to confirm this. “I can only make whatever is given to me,” she said. Nirmala Devi, another resident, said if the children continue to be served just chapatti and salt for lunch, there would be no reason for the villagers to send them to school. They might as well stay home, she added. Anurag Patel, Mirzapur’s district magistrate, rejected these claims, insisting that it was an isolated incident and that the children are otherwise provided “proper meals”. His initial response to the expose, though, had been to remove the headmaster as well as some block-level officials tasked with supervising the functioning of the school under the four-tier system. Chinta Devi, another resident, summed up the villagers’ sentiment thus: “Those at fault should be caught, those who have done no wrong should be let free.” It’s not just the quality of midday meals that Siyur’s residents are concerned about. At the school, Khabar Lahariya found that there was no proper water supply, high-voltage power lines hung dangerously low above the premises, toilets and boundary walls lay in disrepair, although repairs have started in the wake of the controversy. The Siyur school symbolises the majority of Uttar Pradesh’s government schools. The latest Performance Grading Index, which is prepared by the central Department of School Education and Literacy and ranks states according to the quality of school education based on 70 parameters such as infrastructure, learning outcomes and midday meals, assigns Uttar Pradesh a poor Grade 5. Yet, the administration chose to brazen it out when Jaiswal exposed the poor quality of midday meals, much to the chagrin of Shanti Devi, a teaching assistant at the Siyur school. She is the only school official other than the cook who hasn’t been transferred after the expose. “Please don’t ask me any questions,” Devi responded when asked about the row. “My head is spinning from answering so many questions. There is nobody to take care of my children if something happens to me.” To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
NL Hafta has gone behind the paywall, but we love our listeners. So here's a little sneak peek into the complete episode. Apart from Manisha Pande and host Abhinandan Sekhri, this episode of NL Hafta features Jaskirat Singh Bawa, Senior Editor at The Quint and Vivek Kaul, author and a columnist for Newslaundry. The podcast begins with the stories that made it to the week's headlines, including Faye D’Souza stepping down as Mirror Now’s executive editor, recent arrests of journalists, and Tabrez Ansari’s case, amongst others. Abhinandan talks about Modi’s speech on the prevention of livestock diseases in Mathura and the follow up it received on primetime debates. Vivek Kaul thinks these are regular deviations from important issues while Manisha is of the view that these prime-time debates are completely ‘made-up’. The podcast includes conversations on a series of other issues including the rise in traffic fines, news coverage of Chandrayaan 2, Pallav Baghla and Ram Jethmalani’s death. For more, listen up to the complete episode To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
इस सप्ताह एनएल चर्चा में जो विषय शामिल हुए उनमें सबसे महत्वपूर्ण रहा हिंदी दिवस के बहाने भाषाओं की राजनीति पर चर्चा. मीडिया उद्योग में मंदी का दौर और लगातार नौकरियों से हाथ धो रहे पत्रकार भी इस बार चर्चा का विषय बने. वहीं उत्तर प्रदेश के शाहजहांपुर में एक लड़की ने बीजेपी नेता और पूर्व केंद्रीय मंत्री स्वामी चिन्मयानन्द पर बलात्कार का आरोप लगाया है. रेल मंत्री पीयूष गोयल और वित्त मंत्री निर्मला सीतारमन ने हाल में अर्थव्यवस्था को लेकर जो बयान दिए वह सवाल खड़ा करता है कि देश की अर्थव्यवस्था का बागड़ोर जिनके हाथों में हैं वे कितने गंभीर और योग्य लोग हैं. चरंचा के अंत में अनिल यादव ने मशहूर हिंदी लेखक मुक्तिबोध की कविता का पाठ किया. ''एनएल चर्चा’’ में इस बार के मेहमान थे पत्रकार-लेखक अनिल यादव और डोचे वैले के संपादक चारू कार्तिकेय. चर्चा का संचालन न्यूज़लॉन्ड्री के कार्यकारी संपादक अतुल चौरसिया ने किया. चर्चा की शुरुआत अतुल चौरसिया ने हिंदी दिवस से की. अतुल ने कहा कि उड़ीसा के पूर्व सांसद तथागत सत्पथी ने अपने ट्वीटर हैंडल पर हिंदी पखवाड़े की एक तस्वीर शेयर करते हुए भाषा की राजनीति पर सवाल किया. उन्होंने लिखा कि ये हिंदी पखवाड़ा क्या है? कायदे से इस तरह के काम या टेक्स पेयर का जो पैसा है इसका इस्तेमाल उन तमाम भाषाओं के विकास पर किया जाना चाहिए जो की वास्तव में संकट में हैं. वहीं एक दूसरा तबका है जिसका मानना है कि हिंदी देश की राजभाषा है. अभी भी उसको वो स्थान नहीं मिला है जिसकी वो हकदार है? भाषा की राजनीति को लेकर अनिल यादव ने कहा, “भाषा अपने आप में कोई खास चीज है, मैं ऐसा नहीं मानता. मेरा मानना है कि भाषा, कहने का माध्यम है. जो कुछ भी आप दुनिया से कहना चाहते हैं. तो सवाल ये की आपके भाषा की मूल्य और उसकी कीमत उतनी ही होती है जितनी कीमती बात आप दुनिया से कहते है. सवाल यही है कि दुनिया से हिंदी इन दिनों क्या कह रही है. वो फिक्शन के मामले में, नॉन फिक्शन के मामले में, विज्ञान के मामले में, राजनीति के मामले में नया क्या कह रही है. जवाब है कि वो बहुत पिटी पिटाई बात कह रही है. यह हिंदी समाज का संकट है. चूंकि हमारे समाज में कुछ नया नहीं हो रहा है. और हमारे समाज में जो सबसे पुराना राजनीति का तरीका था, धर्म के आधार पर राजनीति करने का वो फिर लौट आया है. बहुत प्रभुता से लौट आया. तो आपकी इज्जत क्यों होगी जबकि आप कुछ नया नहीं कह रहे हैं.” चारू कार्तिकेय ने अपने हस्तक्षेप में कहा, ‘‘मुझे हिंदी के प्रचार प्रसार में बुराई तो नहीं लगती लेकिन दूसरी तरफ मुझे तथागत सत्पथी का सवाल तर्कसंगत भी लगता है. मुझे ये लगता कि भाषा हमारे समाज की वह शै है जिसपर तकरार होती रहती है. अलग-अलग दो भाषाएं बोलने वाले लोगों में एक टकराव होता है. अगर कोई राज्य भाषाओं को बचाने की जिम्मेदारी अपने ऊपर ले लेता है तो राज्य को चाहिए कि लगभग सभी भाषाओं को तवज्जो दी जाए. अगर टैक्स पेयर के पैसों को खर्च करने की बात है तो वो सभी भाषाएं जो लुप्त होती जा रही है. जिनका एक गौरवशाली इतिहास रहा है. जिनको बोलने वाले हाल-फ़िलहाल तक में बड़ी तादाद में लोग हुआ करते थे या अभी भी हैं, उनको बचाए जाने की कोशिश की जानी चाहिए. इस मामले में मैं देखता हूं कि हिंदी उतनी संकट में नहीं है जितनी अन्य भाषाएं हैं. क्योंकि हिंदी फिल्मों की वजह से भारत की अन्तरराष्ट्रीय छवि हिंदी से ही जुड़ी हुई है. लेकिन वहां और भाषाओं से भारत की पहचान नहीं होती. लेकिन हिंदुस्तान के अंदर तो हम जानते है कि भाषाएं हैं और लोगों का उनसे जुड़ाव है.” इसके अलावा भी चर्चा में बाकी विषयों पर विस्तार से दिलचस्प बहस-मुबाहिसा हुआ. पूरी चर्चा सुनने के लिए हमारा पॉडकास्ट सुनें. To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
We’re back! This week, we look at the TV coverage of Chandrayaan-2 and the celebrations on TV news channels on 100 days of Modi. To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
Was the Indian media responsible in its coverage of the #MeToo movement or did it sacrifice its credibility for sensationalism? Author and columnist Amit Varma discuss it with actress Padmapriya, CEO of Civil Foundation, Vivian Schiller, writer and editor, Supriya Nair, and filmmaker Paromita Vohra at #MediaRumble 2019. To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
With journalists facing serious physical threats while doing their job, how much risk is worth it? Author and journalist Deepanjana Pal discuss this with journalist Dhanya Rajendran, reporter Pushpa Rokade, and Sandhya Ravishankar, editor of The Lede at #MediaRumble 2019. To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
President of Observer Research Foundation, Dr. Samir Saran is in conversation with Nikhil Pahwa, Founder and Editor of MediaNama, Amba Kak, global policy advisor at Mozilla, and Dr Subho Ray, President, Internet and Mobile Association of India at #MediaRumble 2019. They discuss the legal, practical and tech challenges in regulating online speech. To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
Do advertisers care about the quality or messaging of the shows they sponsor? Catch journalist Sunetra Choudhury in conversation with Chief Executive Officer of Mullen Lintas, Vikas Mehta, Chief Operating Officer, South West Asia at Cheil WW, Atika Malik, columnist Santosh Desai, and Managing Director of Landor Mumbai, Lulu Raghavan at #MediaRumble 2019. To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
31 अगस्त को असम में एनआरसी की अंतिम सूची प्रकाशित हुई. इस लिस्ट में 19,06,657 लोगों को जगह नहीं मिली. जिन लोगों के नाम एनआरसी लिस्ट में नहीं हैं वे अगले 120 दिनों में विदेशी ट्रिब्यूनल में अर्ज़ी दे सकते हैं. विदेशी ट्रिब्यूनल से असंतुष्ट लोग अंतिम विकल्प के तौर पर सुप्रीम कोर्ट भी जा सकते हैं. क़ानूनन ऐसे लोगों को हिरासत में लेकर करके निर्वासित करने प्रावधान है. लेकिन भारत सरकार ने लोगों को बाहर करने की कोई आधिकारिक घोषणा अब तक नहीं की है. कोई भी देश (बांग्लादेश, पाकिस्तान) इन लोगों को अपने यहां जगह नहीं देगा. तो फिर इनका होगा क्या? To watch this and many more videos, click on http://www.newslaundry.com/
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