DiscoverHistoric Voices Podcast: Global History and Culture(S01-E16) HV Alexandr Solzhenitsyn - "A World Split Apart" - 1978
(S01-E16) HV Alexandr Solzhenitsyn - "A World Split Apart" - 1978

(S01-E16) HV Alexandr Solzhenitsyn - "A World Split Apart" - 1978

Update: 2017-04-11
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In this podcast episode, we feature Alexandr Solzhenitsyn delivering a speech named by others as A World Split Apart at Harvard University in 1978. He is considered the Soviet Union’s greatest author, historian, and resilient critic of the government. In 1970 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. This speech was delivered during tensions of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. The Cuban Missile Crisis occurred less than 15 years earlier. The Vietnam Conflict and ongoing violence in the Middle East were supported on opposite sides by both countries. Both nations were rapidly developing new weapons with even more destructive force than during World War Two. In his speech at Harvard, Mr. Solzhenitsyn shares about the crisis that faces the world and possible solutions to end the violence and threat to humankind. You will hear the voice of him and that of the translator.

In addition to an available download transcript of this speech, I also included another PDF from Wikipedia with the life story of Mr. Solzhenitsyn. Rather than offering a commentary after this speech, I recommend reading the Wikipedia entry about him and his struggle to share the struggle within the Soviet Union and those throughout the world.

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(Bonus) Good News Club v. Milford Central School - Oral Argument - February 28, 2001
An important U.S. Supreme Court case affected religious practice and speech in public schools. It was the Good News Club versus Milford Central School case from 2001. This audio file provides the actual argument before the Supreme Court. The voices include the attorney representing the Good News Club and voices of the Supreme Court justices as they ask questions. Under New York law, Milford Central School policy authorizes district residents to use its building after school for certain activities. Two parents were district residents who were eligible to use the school's facilities. They sought approval of their proposed use and sponsorship of the Good News Club, a private Christian organization for children. The parents submitted a request to hold the Club's weekly afterschool meetings at the school. Milford denied the request reasoning that the proposed use, including singing songs, hearing Bible lessons, memorizing scripture, and praying, was the equivalent of religious worship prohibited by the community use policy. The Club filed suit alleging that the denial violated its free speech rights under the First and Fourteenth Amendments. Ultimately, the District Court granted Milford summary judgment to not grant permission. The parents then appealed the decision. After hearing the case, the Court of Appeals agreed with the District Court that because the subject matter of the Club's was "quintessentially religious", and the activities "fall outside the bounds of pure 'moral and character development,'" According to them, Milford's policy of excluding the Club's meetings was constitutional subject discrimination, not unconstitutional viewpoint discrimination. The parents appealed the decision to the Supreme Court of the United States. The question for the court was, “Did Milford Central School violate the First Amendment free speech rights of the Good News Club when it excluded the Club from meeting after hours at the school? If a violation occurred, was it justified by Milford's concern that permitting the Club's activities would violate the Establishment Clause?” The court reversed the previous court decisions by ruling six justices to three in favor of the parents and the Good News Club.
Justice Thomas - "SCOTUS Decision Good News Club v. Mildord Central School" - 2001
SO2-E06 U.S. Supreme Court case affected religious practice and speech in public schools. It was the Good News Club versus Milford Central School case from 2001. We will hear the voice of Justice Clarence Thomas as he delivers the opinion for the U.S. Supreme Court justices. Under New York law, Milford Central School policy authorizes district residents to use its building after school for certain activities. Two parents were district residents who were eligible to use the school's facilities. They sought approval of their proposed use and sponsorship of the Good News Club, a private Christian organization for children. The parents submitted a request to hold the Club's weekly afterschool meetings at the school. Milford denied the request reasoning that the proposed use, including singing songs, hearing Bible lessons, memorizing scripture, and praying, was the equivalent of religious worship prohibited by the community use policy. The Club filed suit alleging that the denial violated its free speech rights under the First and Fourteenth Amendments. Ultimately, the District Court granted Milford summary judgment to not grant permission. The parents then appealed the decision. After hearing the case, the Court of Appeals agreed with the District Court that because the subject matter of the Club's was "quintessentially religious", and the activities "fall outside the bounds of pure 'moral and character development,'" According to them, Milford's policy of excluding the Club's meetings was constitutional subject discrimination, not unconstitutional viewpoint discrimination. The parents appealed the decision to the Supreme Court of the United States. The question for the court was, “Did Milford Central School violate the First Amendment free speech rights of the Good News Club when it excluded the Club from meeting after hours at the school? If a violation occurred, was it justified by Milford's concern that permitting the Club's activities would violate the Establishment Clause?” The court reversed the previous court decisions by ruling six justices to three in favor of the parents and the Good News Club. This podcast contains an oral summary of the SCOTUS decision by Justice Thomas who spoke on behalf of the majority of the justices. This is one about three minutes. Accompanying this audio podcast are three other items. First, an audio of the argument delivered by the attorneys representing the parents. This is about over sixty minutes in length. In addition to the voice of the attorney representing the Good News Club, you will also hear various Supreme Court justices asking questions. It is quite an interactive event with the justices often interrupting the attorney. Second item included is a formal document that contains information about the case, the formal written opinion by the majority of the justices, and comments by individual justices. Some of them join with the majority, some oppose the decision, and others support in part and oppose in other. The final document included is a two-page handout on how to read a Supreme Court decision. This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net Audio recordings for this podcast come from a variety of sources. This one comes from the Oyez SCOTUS database of audio recordings and written documents. Checkout the website https://www.oyez.org Oyez (pronounced oh-yay), a free law project from Cornell’s Legal Information Institute (LII), Chicago-Kent College of Law and Justia.com, is a multimedia archive devoted to making the Supreme Court of the United States accessible to everyone. It is a complete and authoritative source for all of the Court’s audio since the installation of a recording system in October 1955. Oyez offers transcript-synchronized and searchable audio, plain-English case summaries, illustrated decision information, and full text Supreme Court opinions. Oyez also provides detailed information on every justice throughout the Court’s history. This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, iHeartRadio, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org, and Historic Voices Facebook page. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S02-E05) HV Paul Harvey - "Historic Origins of Pilgrims Thanksgiving" - 1621
Paul Harvey shares a short speech named “Origins of the Pilgrim’s Thanksgiving”. Mr. Harvey helps us to understand the deeper meaning of a custom that dates to the Middle Ages in Europe. To provide more information about this holiday celebrated around the world, four PDF documents accompany this podcast episode: general history of Thanksgiving, history of Thanksgiving in the U.S., history of Thanksgiving in Canada, and history of Thanksgiving in the Netherlands which Mr. Harvey refers as influencing the Pilgrims with their celebration. The Historic Voices podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net The audio recording comes from the Internet Archive online database. It is a non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, audio recordings, software, music, and more. Its purpose is offering permanent access to historical digital collections. Checkout the website at http://archive.org This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, iHeartRadio, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org and Historic Voices Facebook page. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S02-E04) HV Docudrama - "The Pilgrims Sail for America" - 1620
We feature an episode from old time radio, the CBS News Radio Series, You Are There. The docudrama is “The Pilgrims Sail to America in 1620”. Several PDF documents accompany this podcast to provide more information: Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony, Mayflower Ship and Voyage to America, and Mayflower Compact. Created by CBS Radio, it blended history with modern technology, taking an entire network newsroom on a time warp each week reporting the great events of the past. The news reporters were the top national journalists from CBS. The series started in1947 and featured various key events in American and world history, portrayed in dramatic recreations. Additionally, CBS News reporters report on the action and interview the key people from each historical episode. An announcer would give the date and the event, followed by a loud and boldly spoken "You are there!" This radio show was an example of serious attempts during the early days of radio to be educational rather than only entertaining. The beauty of their show was they provided the voices and news commentary while your imagination created the visuals of the historic event and people. The Historic Voices podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net The audio recording comes from the Internet Archive online database. It is a non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, audio recordings, software, music, and more. Its purpose is offering permanent access to historical digital collections. Checkout the website at http://archive.org This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, iHeartRadio, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org and Historic Voices Facebook page. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S02-E03) HV Secretary Robert Gates - "Final Address to West Point Cadets" - February 25, 2011
In this podcast episode, we feature Robert Gates, Secretary of Defense and his speech “Final Address to the West Point Academy Cadets”. In addition to this audio episode, I also provide several PDF documents: first, a transcript of this speech and secondly an overview of his life of service to the nation through the CIA and the Department of Defense. Since this episode is being released on Veterans Day in 2017, I also included a trio of short articles about Veterans Day in the U.S., Armed Forces Day in the U.K., and Memorial Day. This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net These audio recordings provided through the American Rhetoric online database. This website provides more than 5,000 speech transcripts, audio recordings, and videos of public speeches, sermons, lectures, interviews, and more. Checkout the website at http://americanrhetoric.com This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, iHeartRadio, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org, and Historic Voices Facebook page. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S02-E01) HV Docudrama - "Columbus Sails to the Americas" - October 12, 1492
In a change of pace with this first podcast episode of the second season, we feature an episode from old time radio, the CBS News Radio Series, You Are There. The docudrama is “Columbus Sailing to the Americas on October 12, 1492”. Created by CBS Radio, it blended history with modern technology, taking an entire network newsroom on a time warp each week reporting the great events of the past. The news reporters were the top national journalists from CBS. The series started in1947 and featured various key events in American and world history, portrayed in dramatic recreations. Additionally, CBS News reporters report on the action and interview the key people from each historical episode. An announcer would give the date and the event, followed by a loud and boldly spoken "You are there!" This radio show was an example of serious attempts during the early days of radio to be educational rather than only entertaining. The beauty of their show was they provided the voices and news commentary while your imagination created the visuals of the historic event and people. Since the voyages of Columbus 500 years ago, the historical investigation has led to much different interpretation of those events. This radio show presents only one viewpoint. I provide more PDF documents than usual for this episode. Two of them involve background on multiple voyages of Columbus and more information about the man. Three PDF documents represent different ways that Columbus is celebrated or reviled around the world. One is about Columbus Day and two others – Indigenous People Day and Native American Day – provide an alternative perspective by focusing on the people living in the Americas. I leave it to you to draw your own conclusions about the impact of the voyages. The Historic Voices podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net The audio recording comes from the Internet Archive online database. It is a non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, audio recordings, software, music, and more. Its purpose is offering permanent access to historical digital collections. Checkout the website at http://archive.org This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, iHeartRadio, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org and Historic Voices Facebook page. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S01-E37) HV Walter Winchell Newscast - "News of Italy Surrender During WWII and Other News"
In this podcast episode, we feature Walter Winchell and his news broadcast that included information about Italy surrendering during World War Two. The imperial ambitions of the Italian Fascist regime aspired to restore the Roman Empire in North Africa and the Mediterranean were partially met with the annexation of Albania, occupation of British Somaliland, and other territories, but ultimately collapsed after defeats in the East and North African campaigns. In July 1943, following the Allied invasion of Sicily, In addition to this audio episode, I also provide two PDF documents. The first is an overview of the military history of Italy during World War II. The second is the armistice agreement of Italy surrendering to the Allies. Let us now tune our radio dial to September 8, 1943 and listen to Walter Winchell share the day’s news including the surrender of Italy during World War Two. This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net These audio recordings come from the Internet Archive online database. It is a non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, audio recordings, software, music, and more. Its purpose is offering permanent access to historical digital collections. Checkout the website at http://archive.org This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, iHeartRadio, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org, Historic Voices Facebook page, and the Historic Voices YouTube channel. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S01-E34) HV Elie Wiesel - "The Perils of Indifference" - April 12, 1999
In this podcast episode, we feature Elie Wiesel and his speech “The Perils of Indifference”. Mr. Wiesel was a Jewish writer, professor, and Holocaust survivor of the Auschwitz and Buchenwald concentration camps. He spent his life sharing the story of the concentration camps so people would not forget the Holocaust and advocated for ending of genocides occurring today. Much more information is available in the accompanying PDF document with his life story. The speech you are about to hear had been given many times around the world. This time it was given to President Clinton and other leaders and urged them to take action with today’s genocides. Indifference is not an option. This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net This audio recording comes the American Rhetoric online database. This website provides more than 5,000 speech transcripts, audio recordings, and videos of public speeches, sermons, lectures, interviews, and more. Checkout the website at http://americanrhetoric.com  This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, iHeartRadio, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org, Historic Voices Facebook page, and the Historic Voices YouTube channel. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S01-E33) HV President Lyndon Johnson - "The Great Society" - May 22, 1964
In this podcast episode, we feature President Lyndon Johnson and his speech “The Great Society”. President Johnson designed the "Great Society" legislation by expanding civil rights, public broadcasting, Medicare, Medicaid, aid to education, the arts, urban and rural development, public services, and his "War on Poverty". Assisted in part by a growing economy, the War on Poverty helped millions of Americans rise above the poverty line during his administration. Civil rights bills he signed into law banned racial discrimination in public facilities, interstate commerce, the workplace, and housing; the Voting Rights Act prohibited certain requirements in southern states used to disenfranchise African Americans. With the passage of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, the country's immigration system was reformed, encouraging greater immigration from regions other than Europe. Johnson's presidency marked the peak of modern liberalism after the New Deal era. In addition to this audio episode, I also provide several PDF documents: first, a transcript of this speech, secondly a short overview of his life, and finally, a more detailed description of The Great Society envisioned by the president. Let us now tune our radio dial to May 22, 1964 and listen to President Johnson share his vision for The Great Society. This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net The audio recordings is through the American Rhetoric online database. This website provides more than 5,000 speech transcripts, audio recordings, and videos of public speeches, sermons, lectures, interviews, and more. Checkout the website at http://americanrhetoric.com This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, iHeartRadio, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org, Historic Voices Facebook page, and the Historic Voices YouTube channel. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S01-E32) HV Aviation Leader Series - Amelia Earhart - "Future of Women in Flying"
With this podcast episode, we complete a three-part series on aviation leaders. We will listen to Amelia Earhart as she talks about the future of women in aviation. In addition to this audio episode, I also provide two PDF documents: first, a short overview of her life, and finally, a history of women in aviation. This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net The source for this episode’s audio recording was the Internet Archive online database. It is a non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, audio recordings, software, music, and more. Its purpose is offering permanent access to historical digital collections. Checkout the website at http://archive.org This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, iHeartRadio, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org, Historic Voices Facebook page, and the Historic Voices YouTube channel. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S01-E31) HV Aviation Leader Series - Neil Armstrong - Speaking from the Moon - July 20, 1969
With this podcast episode, we are in the middle of a three-part series on aviation leaders. We will listen to the conversation between NASA and Neil Armstrong in the lunar lander as he prepares to be the first human to walk on the surface of the moon. In addition to this audio episode, I also provide two PDF documents: first, a short overview of his life, and finally, the story of Apollo 11 mission to place Armstrong on the moon’s surface. This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net The source for this episode’s audio recording was the Internet Archive online database. It is a non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, audio recordings, software, music, and more. Its purpose is offering permanent access to historical digital collections. Checkout the website at http://archive.org This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, iHeartRadio, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org, Historic Voices Facebook page, and the Historic Voices YouTube channel. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S01-E30) HV Aviation Leaders Series - Colonial John Glenn - First U.S. Astronaut in Space
With this podcast episode, we begin a three-part series on aviation leaders. John Glenn shares remarks as the first American to travel into space. They follow his ticker tape parade in New York City after his return. In addition to this audio episode, I also provide two PDF documents: first, a short overview of his life, and finally, the story of the Mercury Seven pioneer astronauts of which John Glenn was a member. This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net The source for this episode’s audio recording was the Internet Archive online database. It is a non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, audio recordings, software, music, and more. Its purpose is offering permanent access to historical digital collections. Checkout the website at http://archive.org This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org, Historic Voices Facebook page, and the Historic Voices YouTube channel. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S01-E29) HV President Jimmy Carter - "Crisis of Confidence" TV Speech  to the Nation- July 15, 1979
In this podcast episode, we feature President Jimmy Carter and his “Energy and the National Goals” speech. It is often called the “Crisis of Confidence” speech. A major priority of President Carter was the U.S. policy of energy consumption. The nation was suffering from rising oil costs due to OPEC which resulted in gas rationing, long gas lines, and energy shortages just to name a few. Before the formal part of this energy policy speech, President Carter explored reasons for lack of action by Congress with energy issues. He saw the threat as a “crisis of confidence” in our ability to forge a national priority to work together to deal with this and other issues. That section of the speech is why some call this the “Crisis of Confidence” speech. In addition to this audio recording, I also provide three PDF documents: first, a transcript of this speech, second, a short overview of his personal and political life, and finally a summary of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act which was part of President’s Carter’s National Energy Act. This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net These audio recordings come from the American Rhetoric online database. This website provides more than 5,000 speech transcripts, audio recordings, and videos of public speeches, sermons, lectures, interviews, and more. Checkout the website at http://americanrhetoric.com This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org, Historic Voices Facebook page, and the Historic Voices YouTube channel. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S01-E28) HV Paul Harvey - Independence Day Special - "The Pledge of America's First Citizens"
In this podcast episode, we provide a speech by Paul Harvey which is called “The pledge of America’s first citizens.” Mr. Harvey gave this speech annually about the price paid by many of the Founding Fathers for their involvement in the American Revolutionary War. As Mr. Harvey states, some people go to war since they have nothing to lose, in this case, the Founding Fathers had everything to lose since they were already men of influence, power, and wealth. They risked it all for the rest of the soon-to-be Americans and us as their descendants. Some lost it all in the process. On Independence Day, it is good to remember their sacrifices for us. In addition to this audio episode, I also provide three PDF documents: first, a copy of the Declaration of Independence, second, an article about the Founding Fathers, and finally the backstory about composing the Declaration of Independence. This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net These audio recordings come from the Internet Archive online database. It is a non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, audio recordings, software, music, and more. Its purpose is offering permanent access to historical digital collections. Checkout the website at http://archive.org This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, iHeartRadio, Libsyn, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://Paulharveypodcast.org, Paulharveypodcast Facebook page, and the Paul Harvey Podcast YouTube channel. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://paulharveypodcast.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S01-E27) HV Jimmy Stewart - "The Capture of Stacy Gault" Episode - The Six Shooter Radio Show - 1953
In this podcast episode, we take a change of pace and feature a famous American movie actor performing on a 1950s weekly radio show named “The Six Shooter”. The main character is Jimmy Stewart as Britt Ponset, a drifting cowboy in the final years of the wild American west. In addition to this audio episode, I also provide two PDF documents: first, a short life story of Mr. Stewart, and finally, the backstory on this NBC radio show, The Six Shooter. Let us now tune our radio dial to November 8, 1953 for episode eight of the Six Shooter episode named “The Capture of Stacy Gault”. This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network which is a group of family-friendly podcasts bringing a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network at http://LifePodcast.net These audio recordings come from a variety of sources. Some may have been provided through the American Rhetoric online database. This website provides more than 5,000 speech transcripts, audio recordings, and videos of public speeches, sermons, lectures, interviews, and more. Checkout the website at http://americanrhetoric.com Another source for audio may have been the Internet Archive online database. It is a non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, audio recordings, software, music, and more. Its purpose is offering permanent access to historical digital collections. Checkout the website at http://archive.org This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Overcast, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: http://Arendale.org, http://historicvoices.org, Historic Voices Facebook page, and the Historic Voices YouTube channel. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu
(S01-E26) HV President Eisenhower - "Farewell to the Nation" TV Speech - January 17, 1961
The President’s speech is typical for many of the recent U.S. presidents. He began with a quick review of the past and especially the world wars the U.S. has been engaged and the role of the country as peacemaker to help build a better future. Then, he turns to the new challenges which are domestic rather than international. Eisenhower expresses his worry that the U.S. has embraced a permanent armaments industry with the export of weapons around the world. This was a radical change in the U.S. which previously only turned to building of weapons when the country faced immediate aggression. He introduces a new world to the U.S. vocabulary, “industrial-military complex”. Building weapons has become as important as building cars and appliances for the average American. Eisenhower worried that American universities seemed more interested in attracting huge government military contracts that engaged in scientific discovery. He also was concerned about Congress and how they were being influenced by the industrial-military complex through their campaign contributions. In recent years, industries that build weapon systems often distribute their production to as many states as possible. In some cases, 30 or more states producing components for a single system like an aircraft. By doing so, new jobs are created in the home districts of congressional leaders which encourages their votes for military appropriations and productions in the factories located in their states. Rather than building up weapon systems, Eisenhower as the former general and supreme-commander of allied forces encourages disarmament and seeking to resolve differences through negotiation rather than threat of war with even more ferocious weapons. I encourage you to read the PDF document on the backstory on his warning of the American people with the “industrial-military complex.” The article also provides insights into writing of the speech by a collection of speech writers who especially fought over the section of the speech talking about the industrial military complex and the changing research interests of universities. Speech writing is an enormously complicated and political process that involves many with the speaker as the final editor.
(S01-E23) HV General Douglass MacArthur - "Farewell to Congress" Speech - April 19, 1951
In this podcast episode, we feature a speech by General Douglass MacArthur to Congress and the American people. The date was April 19, 1951. The dramatic timing of the speech was that President Harry Truman had relieved General MacArthur of military command of the United Nations forces during the Korean War the previous week. MacArthur explained in the speech his concerns about the Chinese and a retrospective of a lifetime of service to the nation as a member of the military. This seemed to me an appropriate speech to post of Memorial Day as we remember the sacrifices made by the U.S. military on behalf of the nation There are many comparisons and contrasts between two of America’s greatest generals: George Patton and Douglass MacArthur. Those were extraordinary military commanders who are credited with helping to end World War Two more quickly. Both were deeply devoted to the defense of America and its people. And both were frustrated with political leaders who they perceived as stopping a war prematurely before it should be ended. Patton was relieved of command at the end of World War Two since he disagreed with Washington politicians since he believed the Russians were the future enemy and should be engaged militarily and pushed out of Eastern Europe. During the Korean War, MacArthur wanted to continue the war in Korea by invading China and engaging them in war. He even wanted to use tactical, short-range nuclear missiles if necessary during the war against China. President Truman could no longer tolerate the public statements by MacArthur disagreeing with Washington policies and threat to invade China. As a result, President Truman met with General MacArthur and relieved him of command on April 11, 1951 The speech you are about to hear was given to a joint meeting of the U.S. Congress and broadcast to the American people. MacArthur explains his concerns for future Chinese aggression in the Pacific and why he felt that military confrontation was needed by the U.N. troops against them. The speech is also a defense of his lifetime of service to the nation and loyalty to the American people. Another version of this speech will be delivered at West Point. Separately, I provide follow-up podcast episodes which provide three PDF documents: first a transcript of this speech, next some historical background on General MacArthur, and the final PDF with additional information why President Truman relieved this beloved military commander of his command.
(S01-E20) HV Sir. Winston Churchill - "Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat Speech" - May 13, 1940
In this podcast episode, we feature a rebroadcast of a radio speech by Sir Winston Churchill on May 13, 1940. The dramatic timing of the speech was that it was Churchill’s first speech to the British people since being named Prime Minister during early World War II. This speech is part one of a two-part series featuring Mr. Churchill. The next episode will be his famous “Iron Curtain” speech that announced that the Cold War had already begun with the aggressions by the Soviet Union. Germany had been rampaging throughout Europe during early World War Two, conquering one nation another another. The United States would not enter the war for another 18 months and were not providing sufficient support for the British due to their isolationist feelings and wanting to avoid entanglement in European wars. The British morale was at a low-point at this moment as they felt it was their tiny nation was the only one that had not fallen to German occupation and that invasion from the Nazis was ready to begin. Prime Minister Churchill delivers a short speech of the grim reality and positive hope. He promises the British people through an honest assessment that the near future will be “Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat” as they fight against the Germans alone. Yet, he ends this short speech will hope for the British people to not give up, but fight. Accompanying this audio podcast is a written transcript of the speech along with the back story for this particular speech. Each are provided as separate PDF episodes for this podcast.
(S01-E19) HV Walter Winchell - "Radio News Broadcast by Walter Winchell" - Influential Journalist Who Specialized in Gossip News
In this final episode in this two-part series, we feature Mr. Walter Winchell, an American broadcast journalist who focused on often exploitive celebrity news and his interpretation of the day’s news. His rapid-fire delivery of the news was mesmerizing. He separated the short news stories from each other by pressing a telegraph key to create urgency and importance as if to communicate he was reading breaking news stories coming across the news wires. Winchell is recognized as the first successful gossip columnist that drew fifty million readers for his news stories and radio broadcasts each week. He enjoyed reporting exciting or embarrassing information about people and especially entertainers. He was highly feared in Hollywood where scandals could wreck an aspiring movie or theatre actor. In the 1950s, Winchell joined forces with Senator McCarthy’s quest to identify Communists in the entertainment field. When Senator McCarthy was exposed for having little or no information on supposed Communist infiltration, Winchell lost respect by the general public and his listenership plummeted. For those of you who have watched the old Untouchables TV show, Winchell was the narrator at the beginning and throughout the episodes.  I have included a PDF from Wikipedia on the career and life of Mr. Winchell. Let us now tune our radio dial to May 6, 1945 and listen to Mr. Winchell report on his mix of sensational celebrity news, odd collection of world news, and reports from World War Two.
(S01-E18) HV Edward R. Murrow - "Orchestrated Hell Radio Report" - Eyewitness account of WWII bombing raid over Berlin - December 3, 1943
In the podcast episode in this two-part series, we feature Mr. Edward R. Murrow, a well-respected American broadcast journalist. He was a pioneer in radio and television news broadcasting. Murrow was recognized by the public and his peers for his honesty and setting the standard for integrity in delivering the news. During his career for CBS radio, Murrow was appointed as director of CBS’s European operations during the 1930s and 1940s. While he was based in London, he traveled throughout Europe and reported on the beginning of German and Italian aggression against neighboring countries. Through his broadcasts before the U.S. was attacked at Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Murrow brought World War Two to the American public who were still isolationist regarding their lack of interest in the aggression of Japan against China and that of Germany and Italy against our European allies. This episode provides a report by Murrow of him riding with an allied airplane crew that bombed Berlin. As the narrator points out, more than forty of the bombers would not return how. Three of the five news reporters that accompanied the bombers did not come back home as their bombers were shot down. Each word of Murrow’s report was carefully chosen and almost reached the level of poetry with his word choice and delivery. It is no wonder that his reports from London were a powerful influence on public opinion in the U.S. I have included a PDF from Wikipedia on the career and life of Mr. Murrow as well as a transcript of this radio broadcast.
(S01-E14) HV President Eisenhower - "Atoms for Peace" Speech to the U.N. - December 8, 1953
In this podcast episode, we feature President Eisenhower delivering a speech named by others as Atoms for Peace at the United Nations in 1953. This speech was delivered during high tensions of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union.  The Berlin Blockade had only been resolved a few years earlier in 1948.  That event nearly triggered a military confrontation between those who countries then.  Both nations were rapidly developing new weapons with even more destructive force than used at Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War Two.  President Eisenhower previously was General Eisenhower serving as the Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in Europe during World War Two.  After the war ended, he retired from the military and was elected President of the United States in 1953.  Eisenhower was now in a position to take nuclear energy as a weapon and help repurpose it for peaceful purposes.  This speech to the United Nations was part of an intentional campaign called “Operation Candor” to discuss the risks and hopes of a nuclear future for the American people.  In addition to an available download transcript of this speech, I also included another PDF that is a critical entry from Wikipedia providing more context for this speech and the U.S. intentions to influence the European allies and the Soviet Union.  I was impressed with the deep analysis of the article.  Rather than offering a commentary after this speech, I recommend reading the Wikipedia entry about the speech and the bigger issues.
(S01-E04) HV - "We Hold These Truths" Radio Show - Celebrating the 150th Anniversay of the Bill of Rights - December 15, 1941
In this podcast episode, we feature a rebroadcast of a radio show that celebrated the 150th anniversary of the original Bill of Rights approved by Congress and ratified by the states. The dramatic timing of the show was that it was aired live on December 15, 1941, just one week after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. At the end of the radio show, President Roosevelt addressed the nation and stated why war was needed against Japan to guarantee our constitutional rights as free people. That speech was shared during the previous episode of this podcast series. A special thanks to Dennis Humphreys of the Journey’s Into American History Podcast for granting permission to use this historic recording. His podcast can be subscribed through iTunes and other podcast services. In this portion of the radio show, you will hear the voices of famous Hollywood actors portraying average Americans in the late 1700s who debated reasons for passage of the Bill of Rights, its importance to average Americans, and why war might be needed to protect its freedoms. One of the voices you will hear will be Corporal Jimmy Stewart. After the Pearl Harbor bombing, Mr. Stewart immediately enlisted in the military like many other actors at that time. By the end of the war, Mr. Stewart was piloting bombing raids over Germany. He would eventually retire from the United States Air Force Reserves with the rank of Brigadier General, the highest-ranking actor in military history.
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(S01-E16) HV Alexandr Solzhenitsyn - "A World Split Apart" - 1978

(S01-E16) HV Alexandr Solzhenitsyn - "A World Split Apart" - 1978

David Arendale