DiscoverSpeak English Now Podcast: Learn English | Speak English without grammar.#095 
American vs. British 
Vocabulary Differences (part 3)
#095 
American vs. British 
Vocabulary Differences (part 3)

#095 
American vs. British 
Vocabulary Differences (part 3)

Update: 2019-07-043
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Hello, everybody! I am Georgiana your English teacher and founder of SpeakEnglishPodcast.com. My mission is to help you to speak English fluently.

Two weeks ago, we started with a series of vocabulary differences between American and British English. Today we will continue this series, although we’ll focus on food vocabulary differences.

And with a point of view story, you’re gonna compare the different grammar points. It’s the perfect way to learn grammar and new vocabulary without memorizing.

 

Ok! Let’s start!

 

1)Zucchini

Maybe you aren’t familiar with this word.

It’s a long, thin vegetable with dark green skin. It looks similar to a cucumber, but it’s larger, and we don’t eat it in a salad.

 

Yes. I’m talking about a vegetable called zucchini. I love zucchini noodles and zucchini soup! You should try that out because it’s simply delicious!

 

In the United Kingdom, people use the word courgette, which comes from French.

 

American-zucchini

British- courgette

2)I’m sure you know the meaning of the following word.

I’m talking about the word cookie. Everybody loves chocolate cookies!

But do you know the meaning of the word biscuit?

That’s right. Biscuit has the same meaning as "cookie," though it’s used in the UK.

American-cookie

British- biscuit

3) There’s a purple vegetable, similar to an egg. Can you guess?

Exactly! An eggplant!

What do you think? Personally, I don't think eggplants look like an egg.

In British it’s called aubergine. It sounds funny because it’s also a word that comes from French.

American-eggplant

British- aubergine

4) Have you ever heard of jacket potatoes?

No. It’s not a potato that’s wearing a jacket.

In American English, we call them baked potatoes, but in British it’s called jacket potato.

Therefore, baked or jacket potatoes are usually well cooked, so they have a fluffy interior and a crisp skin.

American-baked potatoes

British- jacket potato.

 

READ the TRANSCRIPT here: speakenglishpod.com

Comments (1)

Pedix 2

Please make more episode such this session

Jul 9th
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#095 
American vs. British 
Vocabulary Differences (part 3)

#095 
American vs. British 
Vocabulary Differences (part 3)

Georgiana