DiscoverThe Next Picture Show#146: (Pt. 1) Fahrenheit 11/9 / Roger & Me
#146: (Pt. 1) Fahrenheit 11/9 / Roger & Me

#146: (Pt. 1) Fahrenheit 11/9 / Roger & Me

Update: 2018-10-025
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With Michael Moore’s latest provocation, FAHRENHEIT 11/9, in theaters, we’re returning to the liberal gadfly’s cinematic origins: 1989’s ROGER & ME, a first-person documentary about the declining fortunes of Moore’s hometown of Flint, Michigan, which makes a notable return appearance in his latest film. In this half of the pairing, we consider the impact of Michael Moore, for better and worse, on the culture and documentary form alike, and whether the criticisms leveled at the film upon its release have grown more or less relevant over time. Plus, we take a bite out of the feedback we received on our recent mega-shark double feature.
Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about ROGER & ME, FAHRENHEIT 11/9, or both by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  

Outro Music: The Beach Boys, “Wouldn’t It Be Nice”

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#146: (Pt. 1) Fahrenheit 11/9 / Roger & Me

#146: (Pt. 1) Fahrenheit 11/9 / Roger & Me

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