DiscoverBSD Now363: Traditional Unix toolchains
363: Traditional Unix toolchains

363: Traditional Unix toolchains

Update: 2020-08-13
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FreeBSD Q2 Quarterly Status report of 2020, Traditional Unix Toolchains, BastilleBSD 0.7 released, Finding meltdown on DragonflyBSD, and more



NOTES

This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap



Headlines



FreeBSD Quarterly Report




This report will be covering FreeBSD related projects between April and June, and covers a diverse set of topics ranging from kernel updates over userland and ports, as well to third-party work.

Some highlights picked with the roll of a d100 include, but are not limited to, the ability to forcibly unmounting UFS when the underlying media becomes inaccessible, added preliminary support for Bluetooth Low Energy, a introduction to the FreeBSD Office Hours, and a repository of software collections called potluck to be installed with the pot utility, as well as many many more things.

As a little treat, readers can also get a rare report from the quarterly team.

Finally, on behalf of the quarterly team, I would like to extend my deepest appreciation and thank you to salvadore@, who decided to take down his shingle. His contributions not just the quarterly reports themselves, but also the surrounding tooling to many-fold ease the work, are immeasurable.







Traditional Unix Toolchains




Older Unix systems tend to be fairly uniform in how they handle the so-called 'toolchain' for creating binaries. This blog will give a quick overview of the toolchain pipeline for Unix systems that follow the V7 tradition (which evolved along with Unix, a topic for a separate blog maybe).

Unix is a pipeline based system, either physically or logically. One program takes input, process the data and produces output. The input and output have some interface they obey, usually text-based. The Unix toolchain is no different.







News Roundup



Bastille Day 2020 : v0.7 released




This release matures the project from 0.6.x -> 0.7.x. Continued testing and bug fixes are proving Bastille capable for a range of use-cases. New (experimental) features are examples of innovation from community contribution and feedback. Thank you.







Beastie Bits





Tarsnap




  • This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups.



Feedback/Questions









  • Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv
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363: Traditional Unix toolchains

363: Traditional Unix toolchains

Allan Jude