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Best of: Robert Sapolsky on the toxic intersection of poverty and stress

Best of: Robert Sapolsky on the toxic intersection of poverty and stress

Update: 2020-12-1016
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Robert Sapolsky is a Stanford neuroscientist and primatologist. He’s the author of a slew of important books on human biology and behavior, including most recently Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst. But it’s an older book he wrote that forms the basis for this conversation. In Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers, Sapolsky works through how a stress response that evolved for fast, fight-or-flight situations on the savannah continuously wears on our bodies and brains in modern life.

But stress isn’t just an individual phenomenon. It’s also a social force, applied brutally and unequally across our society. “If you want to see an example of chronic stress, study poverty,” Sapolsky says.

I often say on the show that politics and policy need to begin with a realistic model of human nature. This is a show about that level of the policy conversation: It’s about how poverty and stress exist in a doom loop together, each amplifying the other’s effects on the brain and body, deepening their harms.

And this is a conversation of intense relevance to how we make social policy. Much of the fight in Washington, and in the states, is about whether the best way to get people out of poverty is to make it harder to access help, to make sure the government doesn’t become, in Paul Ryan’s memorable phrase, “a hammock.” Understanding how the stress of poverty acts on people’s minds, how it saps their will and harms their cognitive function and hurts their children, exposes how cruel and wrongheaded that view really is.

Sapolsky and I also discuss whether free will is a myth, why he believes the prison system is incompatible with modern neuroscience, how studying monkeys in times of social change helps makes sense of the current moment in American politics, and much more. It’s worth your time.


Book Recommendations:

The 21 Balloons by William Pene Dubois

Chaos: Making a New Science by James Gleick

The Tangled Wing: Biological Constraints on the Human Spirit by Melvin Konner



Credits:

Producer/Audio engineer - Jeff Geld

Researcher - Roge Karma


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Comments (1)

Juned Shaikh

wonderful and enlightening conversation. "learned helplessness" is very easily identifiable in super destitutes around us.

Dec 12th
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Best of: Robert Sapolsky on the toxic intersection of poverty and stress

Best of: Robert Sapolsky on the toxic intersection of poverty and stress

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