DiscoverBlood & CancerCAR T-cell therapy: Development to access
CAR T-cell therapy: Development to access

CAR T-cell therapy: Development to access

Update: 2019-05-02
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Howard “Skip” Burris, MD, the chief medical officer at Sarah Cannon Cancer Institute in Nashville, Tenn., joins the podcast as a guest host for a discussion on chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy with Helen Heslop, MD, of Baylor College of Medicine, Houston. Dr. Heslop, who has been a leader in CAR T-cell therapy research, recently received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

 

Contact the show: podcasts@mdedge.com or follow us on Twitter at @MDedgeHemOnc.

 

EP 14 Show Notes:

By Emily Bryer, DO, is a resident in the department of internal medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

  • Checkpoint inhibition is the main immunotherapy used in oncology; this allows endogenous T cells to react against targeted antigens on tumor cells.
  • CAR T-cell therapy: Autologous product (T cells collected from recipient) are expanded ex vivo, genetically modified with chimeric antigen receptor, and then are reinfused into the patient.
  • While antibody treatment can be used for multiple patients, CAR T-cell therapy is currently patient specific and autologous.
  • Current candidates for CAR-T therapy:
    • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and young adults.
    • CD19 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • There is a 40% response rate plateau at 2 years with CAR-T therapy, with lymphoma response rates lower than those of pediatric ALL.
  • CAR T-cell therapies likely will continue to be done on an inpatient basis because of significant side effects:
    • Cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity.
  • Future directions for CAR-T therapy:
    • Continue ongoing studies in mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    • Investigate the potential to replace autologous transplant with CAR T-cell therapy.
    • Maintain and enhance activity of CAR by promoting immune response with multiple antigens, such as CD19 + CD22.
    • Reduce complications associated with CAR-T therapy.
    • Study CAR-T therapy earlier in the disease process.

Credit: Caron A. Jacobson and Jerome Ritz/Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

Image credit: Caron A. Jacobson and Jerome Ritz/Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

References:

 

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CAR T-cell therapy: Development to access

CAR T-cell therapy: Development to access

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