DiscoverBlame it on the Fame: Milli VanilliI Can Still Make Something Out of That | 6
I Can Still Make Something Out of That  | 6

I Can Still Make Something Out of That | 6

Update: 2024-06-032
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The episode begins with Rob Pilatus's arrest for attempting to steal a car, highlighting his struggles with addiction and the public downfall of Millie Vanille. Ingrid, Rob's former girlfriend, bails him out of jail at the request of Frank Farian, who then brings Rob back to Germany and offers him a chance to revive his career. However, Rob's addiction continues to plague him, and he relapses multiple times. Despite his struggles, Frank offers him a chance to work on a solo project or a Millie Vanille reboot, but only if he stays clean. Rob agrees, but his addiction ultimately proves too strong. The episode culminates in Rob's death by suicide, leaving Ingrid devastated and Frank seemingly unmoved. The episode explores the complex dynamics of the music industry, the exploitation of Black artists, and the devastating consequences of addiction. It also raises questions about Frank Farian's role in Rob's life and whether he truly cared about the singer's well-being.

Outlines

00:00:00
Rob's Downfall and Ingrid's Intervention

This Chapter begins with Rob Pilatus's arrest for attempting to steal a car, highlighting his struggles with addiction and the public downfall of Millie Vanille. Ingrid, Rob's former girlfriend, bails him out of jail at the request of Frank Farian, who then brings Rob back to Germany and offers him a chance to revive his career.

00:04:03
Rob's Return to Germany and Frank's Offer

This Chapter details Rob's return to Germany for a gala celebrating Frank Farian's 30 years in music. Frank offers Rob a chance to work on a solo project or a Millie Vanille reboot, but only if he stays clean. Rob agrees, but his addiction ultimately proves too strong.

00:11:50
Rob's Interview and His Struggles with Addiction

This Chapter focuses on Rob's interview with a local policeman writing a book about addiction. Rob reveals his struggles with addiction and his hope for a return to fame. He also expresses his fear of relapsing and the consequences that would follow.

00:19:08
Rob's Funeral and Frank's Absence

This Chapter details Rob's funeral, where Ingrid is overwhelmed with grief while Frank is noticeably absent. The episode explores the complex dynamics of the music industry, the exploitation of Black artists, and the devastating consequences of addiction.

00:23:47
The Legacy of Millie Vanille and the Exploitation of Black Artists

This Chapter reflects on the legacy of Millie Vanille and the exploitation of Black artists in the music industry. The episode highlights the power dynamics at play and the lasting impact of Frank Farian's actions on Rob Pilatus's life.

Keywords

Rob Pilatus
Rob Pilatus was one half of the pop duo Millie Vanille, known for their hit songs "Girl You Know It's True" and "Blame It on the Rain." He was born in Munich, Germany, and began his career as a breakdancer before being discovered by Frank Farian. Pilatus struggled with addiction throughout his life, which ultimately led to his death by suicide in 1998.

Frank Farian
Frank Farian is a German record producer and songwriter known for creating the pop group Boney M. and the lip-syncing duo Millie Vanille. He is a controversial figure in the music industry, known for his use of ghost singers and his control over the artists he worked with. Farian's relationship with Rob Pilatus was particularly complex, marked by both support and exploitation.

Millie Vanille
Millie Vanille was a pop duo consisting of Rob Pilatus and Fab Morvan. They were known for their hit songs "Girl You Know It's True" and "Blame It on the Rain." The group was created by Frank Farian, who used Pilatus and Morvan as lip-syncers while he provided the vocals. The truth about Millie Vanille's lip-syncing was revealed in 1990, leading to a scandal that tarnished their reputation.

Addiction
Addiction is a chronic disease characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences. It is a complex condition that can affect individuals of all ages, races, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Addiction can have devastating effects on individuals, families, and communities.

Exploitation
Exploitation is the act of using someone or something unfairly for one's own advantage. In the context of the music industry, exploitation can take many forms, including the use of ghost singers, the withholding of royalties, and the control of artists' careers. Exploitation can have a devastating impact on artists, both financially and emotionally.

Music Industry
The music industry is a global industry that encompasses the creation, production, distribution, and marketing of music. It is a complex and competitive industry, with a long history of exploitation and power imbalances. The music industry has been the subject of much debate and scrutiny, particularly in relation to the treatment of artists and the impact of technology on the industry.

Q&A

  • What were Rob Pilatus's struggles with addiction and how did they impact his life?

    Rob Pilatus struggled with addiction throughout his life, which ultimately led to his death by suicide. His addiction caused him to lose his career, his relationships, and his sense of self. He was in and out of rehab and prison, and his addiction had a devastating impact on his health.

  • What was Frank Farian's role in Rob Pilatus's life and how did he influence his career?

    Frank Farian created Millie Vanille and used Rob Pilatus as a lip-syncer. He controlled Pilatus's career and ultimately exploited him for his own gain. While Farian offered Pilatus a chance to revive his career after his arrest, his actions were ultimately driven by self-interest and a desire to maintain control.

  • What are the ethical implications of Frank Farian's actions and the exploitation of Black artists in the music industry?

    Frank Farian's actions raise ethical questions about the exploitation of Black artists in the music industry. His use of ghost singers and his control over Millie Vanille's career highlight the power imbalances that exist in the industry. The episode suggests that Black artists are often exploited for their talent and that their voices are often silenced.

  • What is the lasting impact of the Millie Vanille scandal and how does it reflect on the music industry?

    The Millie Vanille scandal had a lasting impact on the music industry, exposing the use of ghost singers and the exploitation of artists. It also raised questions about the authenticity of pop music and the role of race in the industry. The scandal serves as a reminder of the power dynamics at play in the music industry and the need for greater transparency and accountability.

  • What lessons can be learned from Rob Pilatus's story and the complex relationship he had with Frank Farian?

    Rob Pilatus's story is a cautionary tale about the dangers of fame, addiction, and the exploitation of artists. It highlights the importance of mental health and the need for support systems in the music industry. It also raises questions about the responsibility of those in positions of power to protect and support the artists they work with.

Show Notes

As Rob’s life spirals out of control, he gets a surprising offer…but is it another deal with the devil or is it for real?


If you or someone you know is struggling with substance abuse disorder, reach out for help. In the U.S. you can contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration by calling 1-800-662-HELP.


Special thanks to Wiedemann & Berg Film, creators of the Milli Vanilli biopic “Girl You Know It’s True.”

See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

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I Can Still Make Something Out of That  | 6

I Can Still Make Something Out of That | 6