DiscoverNew Books in EducationJonathan Haidt, "The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure" (Penguin, 2018)
Jonathan Haidt, "The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure" (Penguin, 2018)

Jonathan Haidt, "The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure" (Penguin, 2018)

Update: 2019-10-28
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We say on this show all the time that democracy is hard work. But what does that really mean? What it is about our dispositions that makes it so hard to see eye to eye and come together for the greater good? And why, despite all that, do we feel compelled to do it anyway? Jonathan Haidt is the perfect person to help us unpack those questions.

We also explore what we can do now to educate the next generation of democratic citizens, based on the research Jonathan and co-author Greg Lukianoff did for their latest book The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure (Penguin, 2018).

Jonathan is social psychologist at New York University’s Stern School of Business. His research examines the intuitive foundations of morality, and how morality varies across cultures––including the cultures of American progressive, conservatives, and libertarians.

Democracy Works is created by the McCourtney Institute for Democracy at Penn State and recorded at WPSU Penn State, central Pennsylvania’s NPR station.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Jonathan Haidt, "The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure" (Penguin, 2018)

Jonathan Haidt, "The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure" (Penguin, 2018)

Marshall Poe