DiscoverConsider This from NPRKids Born Today Could Face Up To 7 Times More Climate Disasters
Kids Born Today Could Face Up To 7 Times More Climate Disasters

Kids Born Today Could Face Up To 7 Times More Climate Disasters

Update: 2021-10-051
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Children being born now will experience extreme climate events at a rate that is two to seven times higher than people born in 1960, according to a new study in the journal Science.

The researchers compared a person born in 1960 with a child who was six years old in 2020. That six-year-old will experience twice as many cyclones and wildfires, three times as many river floods, four times as many crop failures and five times as many droughts. Read more about the study here.

These extreme changes not only endanger the environment, they take a toll on our mental health. KNAU reporter Melissa Sevigny spoke with residents in Flagstaff, Arizona who are reeling from a summer rife with fires and floods.

And NPR's Michel Martin spoke with two climate activists of different generations — Jasmine Butler and Denis Hayes — about their outlook on the planet's future amid new climate change reports.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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Kids Born Today Could Face Up To 7 Times More Climate Disasters

Kids Born Today Could Face Up To 7 Times More Climate Disasters

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