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Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (ACAMH)

Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (ACAMH)

Author: The Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health

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We focus on bridging the gap between rigorous research and best practice relating to children's mental health. We hold a body of knowledge and act as information hub for sharing best practice to benefit all of those who work with children. Visit our website (https://www.acamh.org/) for a host of free evidence-based mental health resources.
279 Episodes
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DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26241 In this ‘RESHAPE Study’ series episode, Professor Tamsin Newlove-Delgado, Franki Mathews, and Dr. Kate Allen provide insight into the findings from the RESHAPE study with regards to how young people sought support for their mental health and accessed services during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. The ‘RESHAPE Study’ series is a new mini-in conversation series that will explore the RESHAPE study and the impact of its findings for parents, teachers, policymakers, and mental health professionals. Discussion points include: Patterns of service contact during COVID and how these findings can inform service provision. Insight into the qualitive interviews with parents and young people about their experiences with help-seeking and service access during COVID. The experiences of commissioners of child mental health services with regards to commissioning services and the challenges they faced. Main implications from the study for meeting children and young people’s needs. RESHAPE or ‘REflecting on the impactS of covid-19 on cHildren And young People in England: exploring experiences of lockdown, service access and education’ is a large study looking at how life changed for children, young people, and parents during the lockdown and how this may have affected them. This is a follow-on study from the National Study of Health and Wellbeing: Children and Young people and is a joint effort between the University of Exeter, the University of Cambridge, King’s College London and the NHS.
In this In Conversation podcast, Dr. Seonaid Anderson is joined by Dr. Maddie Groom to discuss a current research project focusing on Tics and Tourette Syndrome called INTEND. INTEND stands for ImproviNg Tic Services in EnglaND. Discussion points include: The ideas behind the project and how the project is funded. Insight into what Tics are, and their impact. How health care professionals are involved with the INTEND project and how they can get involved. The importance of a recommended service model and the impact of there being no NICE guidelines in the UK for Tic Disorders and Tourette Syndrome. This episode is part of The Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health’s series on Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders. The series explores the evidence-based research on Tourette Syndrome, and other Tic Disorders, as well as the education, treatments, and the influences of the pandemic and social media. #ListenLearnLike DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26823
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26814 In this Papers Podcast, Professor Jonathan Green discusses his CAMH journal Debate paper ‘Debate: Neurodiversity, autism and healthcare’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/camh.12663). This podcast coincides with World Autism Acceptance Week. Discussion points include: The current experience of CAMH professionals working in the field of neurodiversity. The evolution of the autism concept and where we are currently in our understanding. The different realities of autism (as a clinical concept, an administrative term, and as a self-identification) and whether these different realities can co-exist. The risk of fragmentation and loss of a common language and why it matters to have a common language. Insight into an evidence-based framework for Autism. Autism as emergent and transactional and the impact for CAMH professionals. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26383 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. Jiedi Lei discusses her JCPP paper ‘Understanding the relationship between social camouflaging in autism and safety behaviours in social anxiety in autistic and non-autistic adolescents’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13884). Jiedi is the first author of the paper. There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: The definition of ‘social camouflaging’ and ‘masking’, how it typically manifests, and how it relates to social anxiety in autistic adolescents. Safety behaviours in social anxiety in autistic and non-autistic adolescents. How participants were recruited and engaged using cartoon-like stop-motion videos. Gender differences that emerged. Implications of the findings for CAMH professionals and how the findings could inform assessment and treatment of social anxiety disorder for autistic adolescents. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26760 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. Susanne Schweizer discusses her JCPP Advances paper ‘The relationship between cognitive and affective control and adolescent mental health’ (https://doi.org/10.1002/jcv2.12204). Susanne is the lead author of the paper. There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: Definition of cognitive and affective control and the importance of cognitive and affective control. The association between depressive symptoms and cognitive and affective control. The implications of the study for interventions for adolescent mental health. The implications for future research and for parents, carers and teachers. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26254 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. Karen Mansfield discusses her JCPP Advances Editorial Perspective ‘Missing the context: The challenge of social inequalities to school‐based mental health interventions’ (https://doi.org/10.1002/jcv2.12165). Karen’s work aims to apply solid research to understand, promote, and protect the health and wellbeing of children and adolescents, with a particular interest in the promotion of equity, inclusion, engagement, and agency. Discussion points include: The link between social economic adversity and children’s mental health. Scepticism around the impact and effectiveness of school-based intervention programmes. Potential issues of a ‘one size fits all’ approach and a ‘selective approach’. What to consider when designing interventions that both improve wellbeing and reduce inequalities. The challenges around measuring effectiveness. Potential policy shifts to consider and practical ways to improve children’s wellbeing in schools. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26268 In this Papers Podcast, Professor Sooyeon (Aly) Suh discusses her co-authored JCPP paper ‘Validation of the Parental Understanding and Misperceptions about BAby’s Sleep Questionnaire using auto-videosomnography’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13797). There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include. How prevalent paediatric sleep disorders are and how these sleep problems impact children. The association between parental cognition and children’s sleep. How the questionnaire was developed and the cultural differences in sleep patterns. The importance of re-examining parental beliefs and attitudes about their child’s sleep. Implications of the findings for researchers & how the findings might be translated into practice to support CAMH professionals and clinicians. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26603 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. Si-Jing Chen discusses her JCPP paper ‘Subtyping at-risk adolescents for predicting response toward insomnia prevention program’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13904). Si-Jing is the first author of the paper. There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: Insomnia prevalence and impact in adolescences. Insight into the brief cognitive-behavioural prevention insomnia programme. Why the cognitive-behavioural sleep intervention was predominantly more effective for anxiety than depression. Implications of findings for CAMH professionals, and how the findings can be translated into practice. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26601 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. Christina Stadler discuss her co-authored JCPP paper ‘START NOW: a cognitive behavioral skills training for adolescent girls with conduct or oppositional defiant disorder – a randomized clinical trial’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13896). There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: Why the researchers decided to undertake the intervention (START NOW) in youth welfare institutions. Insight into START NOW, a cognitive-behavioural, dialectical behaviour therapy-oriented skills training program. The methodological challenges in undertaking this randomized control trial. Implications for practitioners, and messages for parents and carers. Potential areas of further investigation with regards to the START NOW intervention. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26554 ‘Colouring the Mind: Racism and Mental Health’ is a new In Conversation mini-series that will explore how racism affects mental health, with a particular focus on racism in the mental health system and racism in the mental health concept. In this episode, Malaika Okundi and Jessica O’Logbon focus on racism in the mental health system and discuss what the mental health system is, how people of colour are treated in the mental health system, and where we can go from here. Discussion points include: Definition of the mental health system with a focus on the UK mental health system. Formal and informal mental health systems. How people of colour are treated differently by the mental health system. The biases that exist for people of colour within the mental health system. Distrust in the mental health system and how history impacts people’ s perspectives of the system. The importance of cultural competency training and lived experience advising. Please note that what Malaika and Jess share in this series is derived from their work, as well as from research and literature surrounding these topics. Whilst they are not experts on racism or mental health, personal experience does play a role in their discussions.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26537 TRIGGER WARNING: Please be aware that this podcast explores themes around the topic of self-harm.  If you or a person you know is struggling with their mental health, please seek support by accessing the helplines and resources provided by the NHS website. For those outside the UK please use an internet search to find an organisation that can offer direct support. In this ‘Insights from the OxWell Student Survey’ episode, Dr. Galit Geulayov and Dr. Rohan Borschmann comment on the findings from the OxWell survey regarding self-harm behaviours as well as informal and formal support for adolescents who self-harm. The ‘Insights from the OxWell Student Survey‘ series is a new mini-in conversation series that will explore the OxWell study and the impact of its findings for parents, teachers, policymakers and mental health professionals. Discussion points include: What was measured in relation to self-harm in the OxWell student survey. Self-harm and loneliness. Gender and age differences in self-harm behaviours. Types of support accessed by adolescents following self-harm. Informal and formal support for adolescents who self-harm. Potential implications of the findings and plans for the next OxWell waves regarding self-harm behaviours in adolescents. OxWell is a large-scale student survey designed to measure the wellbeing of children and young people. It looks at mental wellbeing, anxiety, indicators of vulnerability such as bullying and loneliness, school experience, access to services, safety online and many more areas. It is a joint effort between schools, young people, the NHS, local authorities and the OxWell research team at the University of Oxford’s Department of Psychiatry.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26496 In this In Conversation podcast, we are joined by Dr. Emma Willmott and Dr. Tom Jewell, from the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust and King’s College London, to discuss their recently published scoping review on psychological interventions for Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID). Discussion points include: The main aims of the review into psychological interventions for ARFID. How many studies were identified and the main findings. Different intervention modalities for ARFID. The lack of consistency when measuring change in patients with ARFID and how best to measure recovery for patients with ARFID. Recommendations on next steps to advance knowledge of ARFID and effective treatments. Advice and resources for non-specialist eating disorder clinicians. This is the second episode of a two-part series on ARFID with Dr. Emma Willmott and Dr. Tom Jewell. Episode one can be found here: ‘Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID): Prevalence and Implications’.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26498 In this In Conversation podcast, we are joined by Dr. Emma Willmott and Dr. Tom Jewell, from the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust and King’s College London, to discuss Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID). Discussion points include: An overview of ARFID and what underlies the dietary restriction in ARFID. Similarities and differences in how ARFID may present and people’s experiences of ARFID. Prevalence of ARFID and how it differs from Anorexia Nervosa. Difference between ARFID and picky or fussy eating. The co-morbidity between Autism and ARFID. This is the first episode of a two-part series on ARFID with Dr. Emma Willmott and Dr. Tom Jewell. Episode two can be found here: ‘Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID): Psychological Interventions and Outcomes’.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26371 In this Papers Podcast, Professor Kerstin von Plessen discusses her co-authored JCPP Advances paper ‘Performing well but not appreciating it – A trait feature of anorexia nervosa’ (https://doi.org/10.1002/jcv2.12194). There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: What is currently known about the relationship between perfectionism and anorexia nervosa. Insight into a novel behavioural method for measuring perfectionism and why it is important to look beyond self-evaluation reports. What makes self-evaluation reports limited in comparison to the novel behavioural method. The implications of participants, who have recovered from anorexia nervosa, having evaluated their performances significantly more negatively than their respective controls. Implications of findings from clinicians and child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) professionals. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26478 In this ‘RESHAPE Study’ series episode, Professor Tamsin Ford and Clara Faria explore the findings from the ‘National Study of Health and Wellbeing: Children and Young People’ as they relate to eating disorders, and why these findings are important. The ‘RESHAPE Study’ series is a new mini-in conversation series that will explore the RESHAPE study and the impact of its findings for parents, teachers, policymakers, and mental health professionals. Discussion points include: The National Survey Study design and the methods used to measure the number of children and young people with eating disorders. The correlation between an increase in population-level prevalence of eating disorders and help seeking. The increase in waiting times following the COVID-19 pandemic and the unmet needs of children and young people with eating disorders. Recommendations for commissioners and how we can ensure early identification of eating disorders. The importance of ensuring boys and men are not overlooked. Recommendations for future interventions and how to improve medical education around eating disorders. RESHAPE or ‘REflecting on the impactS of covid-19 on cHildren And young People in England: exploring experiences of lockdown, service access and education’ is a large study looking at how life changed for children, young people, and parents during the lockdown and how this may have affected them. This is a follow-on study from the National Study of Health and Wellbeing: Children and Young people and is a joint effort between the University of Exeter, the University of Cambridge, King’s College London and the NHS.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26249 In this Papers Podcast, Isaac Ahuvia discusses his JCPP paper ‘Evaluating a treatment selection approach for online single-session interventions for adolescent depression’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13822). Isaac is the lead author of the paper. There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: Definition of single-session interventions. How the treatment selection algorithms were created and tested. Implications for future research and front-line clinicians. Will these types of machine-learning algorithms be refined to be usable for the future? In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26252 In this Papers Podcast, Lottie Shipp discusses her JCPP Advances paper ‘The relationship between dissociation and panic symptoms in adolescence and the exploration of potential mediators’ (https://doi.org/10.1002/jcv2.12202). Lottie is the lead author of the paper. There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: Definition of ‘dissociation’ and insight into the subtype ‘felt sense of anomaly dissociation’. The difference between ‘cognitive reappraisal strategies’ and ‘cognitive appraisal of dissociation’. How common panic disorders are and the impact of panic symptoms in young people. Implications of the study for researchers, clinicians, and practitioners. The importance of the relevance and interpretation of dissociative experiences. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
In this ‘RESHAPE Study’ series episode, Professor Tamsin Ford and Lauren Cross explore the lockdown experiences of young people and parents, as well as discuss reintegration back into pre-pandemic routines. The ‘RESHAPE Study’ series is a new mini-in conversation series that will explore the RESHAPE study and the impact of its findings for parents, teachers, policymakers, and mental health professionals. Discussion points include: How the contradictory findings of existing literature on the experiences of young people’s mental health during COVID shaped the planning of the study. The RESHAPE study design, how participants were selected, and the unexpected challenges. The importance of structure and routine, as well as access to social and familial connections. Engagement versus efficiency with regards to learning during the pandemic and the role of schooling. Help-seeking and self-problem solving and the importance of matching what we provide to the needs of the individual person. Navigating reintegration and the importance of communication and compassion. RESHAPE or ‘REflecting on the impactS of covid-19 on cHildren And young People in England: exploring experiences of lockdown, service access and education’ is a large study looking at how life changed for children, young people, and parents during the lockdown and how this may have affected them. This is a follow-on study from the National Study of Health and Wellbeing: Children and Young people and is a joint effort between the University of Exeter, the University of Cambridge, King’s College London and the NHS. DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26245
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26112 In this In Conversation podcast, we are joined by the President of PRUsAP, Sarah Johnson. Sarah also advises the Department for Education for Alternative Provision and is the Director of Pheonix Education Consultancy. Sarah published two books in Autumn 2023 focusing on social, emotional, and mental health (SEMH) which are part of the series ‘All about SEMH’. Discussion points include: The definition of SEMH and what Alternative Provisions are like in the UK. The challenges children with SEMH needs may face in the classroom environment. How equipped is mainstream education to support SEMH needs of children. Current message to policymakers on the provision of education for SEMH children. An overview of Sarah’s upcoming books and how might teachers use them.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26219 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. Stefanos Mastrotheodoros and Dr. Marco Boks discuss their co-authored JCPP paper ‘Negative parenting, epigenetic age, and psychological problems: prospective associations from adolescence to young adulthood’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13821). There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: Definition of the term ‘epigenetic age’ and what is known about its association with stress. Insight into ‘softer negative parenting indicators’ in the context of the study. Should ‘epigenetic clocks’ be used as a diagnostic or assessment tool in mental health services? The implications of the findings for child and adolescent mental health professionals. The scientific importance of the paper as having being pre-registered. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
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